Skip header and navigation

Refine By

49 records – page 1 of 5.

[Acute myocardial infarction after snow removal].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175912
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(2):181-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005

Association of aspirin dosage to clinical outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention: observations from the Ottawa Heart Institute PCI Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152283
Source
J Invasive Cardiol. 2009 Mar;21(3):121-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Derek So
E Francis Cook
Michel Le May
Chris Glover
William Williams
Andrew Ha
Richard Davies
Michael Froeschl
Jean-Fran Cois Marquis
Edward O'Brien
Marino Labinaz
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Cardiology, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. dso@ottawaheart.ca
Source
J Invasive Cardiol. 2009 Mar;21(3):121-7
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - methods
Aspirin - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - therapy
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control - therapy
Myocardial Ischemia - prevention & control - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Discharge
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Prospective Studies
Recurrence - prevention & control
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Dual antiplatelet therapy, with aspirin and a thienopyridine, is the accepted treatment after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). No clear evidence exists regarding the ideal dosage of aspirin. Recent guidelines recommend higher-dose aspirin because of the possible decrease in stent thrombosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that high-dose aspirin of 325 mg decreases death and myocardial infarction (MI) compared to a lower dose of 81 mg in patients undergoing PCI.
An observational cohort study of 1,840 consecutive patients who underwent PCI was conducted. Patients who did not survive to discharge were excluded. The primary endpoint was a composite of all-cause mortality and MI at 1 year.
Nine-hundred and thirty patients (50.5%) were discharged on 325 mg of aspirin and 910 (49.5%) were discharged of 81 mg. The risk of all-cause mortality or MI was not significantly different between patients: low-dose 5.49% (50/910) vs. high-dose 4.19% (39/930); adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73-1.85). In a multivariable analysis, the Charlson comorbidity score (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.18-1.58) and urgent PCI (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.03-3.00) were associated with increased death or MI. Among patients with drug-eluting stents, the use of low-dose aspirin did not predispose them to death or MI (adjusted OR, 1.12, 95% CI, 0.53-2.34).
In this large contemporary analysis of PCI patients, no differences in death or MI were observed at 1 year between patients discharged on low-dose aspirin 81 mg compared to patients on a higher dose.
PubMed ID
19258643 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Canadian study of the sirolimus-eluting stent in the treatment of patients with long de novo lesions in small native coronary arteries (C-SIRIUS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181039
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004 Mar 17;43(6):1110-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-17-2004
Author
Erick Schampaert
Eric A Cohen
Michael Schlüter
François Reeves
Mouhieddin Traboulsi
Lawrence M Title
Richard E Kuntz
Jeffrey J Popma
Author Affiliation
Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, 5400 Bl. Gouin O., Montréal, Québec, Canada H4J 1C5. erick.schaempaert.hsc@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004 Mar 17;43(6):1110-5
Date
Mar-17-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - methods
Canada
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - pathology - radiography - therapy
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Double-Blind Method
Drug Delivery Systems
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - administration & dosage
Male
Middle Aged
Sirolimus - administration & dosage
Stents
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We assessed the safety and effectiveness of the sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) in treating single de novo long lesions in small native coronary arteries compared to an identical bare metal stent (BMS).
The SES was previously demonstrated to reduce restenosis significantly. However, patients with long lesions in small vessels have not been well studied and may define a group at very high risk.
The Canadian Study of the Sirolimus-Eluting Stent in the Treatment of Patients With Long De Novo Lesions in Small Native Coronary Arteries (C-SIRIUS) was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial comparing SES versus identical BMS. The primary end point was in-stent minimal lumen diameter (MLD) at eight months. Secondary end points included angiographic restenosis at 8 months, target lesion revascularization (TLR), and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at 270 days.
A total of 100 patients were enrolled at eight Canadian sites. The in-stent MLD at eight months was 2.46 +/- 0.37 mm in the SES compared with 1.49 +/- 0.75 mm in the BMS (a 65% increase, p
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004 Mar 17;43(6):1116-715028376
PubMed ID
15028375 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can the optimal type of stent be predicted based on clinical risk factors? A subgroup analysis of the randomized BASKET-PROVE trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274371
Source
Am Heart J. 2016 Mar;173:1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Giuseppe Vassalli
Catherine Klersy
Stefano De Servi
Soeren Galatius
Paul Erne
Franz Eberli
Hans Rickli
Burkhard Hornig
Osmund Bertel
Piero Bonetti
Tiziano Moccetti
Christoph Kaiser
Matthias Pfisterer
Giovanni Pedrazzini
Source
Am Heart J. 2016 Mar;173:1-7
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - methods
Austria - epidemiology
Cause of Death - trends
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - surgery
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prognosis
Prosthesis Design
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Stents - standards
Survival Rate - trends
Switzerland - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The randomized BASKET-PROVE study showed no significant differences between sirolimus-eluting stents (SES), everolimus-eluting stents (EES), and bare-metal stents (BMS) with respect to the primary end point, rates of death from cardiac causes, or myocardial infarction (MI) at 2 years of follow-up, in patients requiring stenting of a large coronary artery. Clinical risk factors may affect clinical outcomes after percutaneous coronary interventions. We present a retrospective analysis of the BASKET-PROVE data addressing the question as to whether the optimal type of stent can be predicted based on a cumulative clinical risk score.
A total of 2,314 patients (mean age 66 years) who underwent coronary angioplasty and implantation of =1 stents that were =3.0 mm in diameter were randomly assigned to receive SES, EES, or BMS. A cumulative clinical risk score was derived using a Cox model that included age, gender, cardiovascular risk factors (hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, family history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, smoking), presence of =2 comorbidities (stroke, peripheral artery disease, chronic kidney disease, chronic rheumatic disease), a history of MI or coronary revascularization, and clinical presentation (stable angina, unstable angina, ST-segment elevation MI).
An aggregate drug-eluting stent (DES) group (n = 1,549) comprising 775 patients receiving SES and 774 patients receiving EES was compared to 765 patients receiving BMS. Rates of death from cardiac causes or nonfatal MI at 2 years of follow-up were significantly increased in patients who were in the high tertile of risk stratification for the clinical risk score compared to those who were in the aggregate low-mid tertiles. In patients with a high clinical risk score, rates of death from cardiac causes or nonfatal MI were lower in patients receiving DES (2.4 per 100 person-years, 95% CI 1.6-3.6) compared with BMS (5.5 per 100 person-years, 95% CI 3.7-8.2, hazard ratio 0.45, 95% CI 0.26-0.80, P = .007). However, they were not significantly different between receivers of DES and BMS in patients in the low-mid risk tertiles.
This exploratory analysis suggests that, in patients who require stenting of a large coronary artery, use of a clinical risk score may identify those patients for whom DES use may confer a clinical advantage over BMS, beyond lower restenosis rates.
PubMed ID
26920590 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can we improve length of hospitalization in ST elevation myocardial infarction patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148104
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Oct;25(10):585-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Mark A Kotowycz
Renu Pal Syal
Rizwan Afzal
Madhu K Natarajan
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Oct;25(10):585-8
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - methods
Electrocardiography
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality - trends
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Length of Stay - trends
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - physiopathology - therapy
Ontario - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
Patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction have traditionally been hospitalized for five to seven days to monitor for serious complications such as heart failure, arrhythmias, reinfarction and death. The Zwolle primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) index is an externally validated risk score that has been used to identify low-risk primary PCI patients who can safely be discharged from the hospital within 48 h to 72 h.
The Zwolle score was retrospectively applied to all ST elevation myocardial infarction patients treated with primary PCI between April 2004 and February 2006 at a large Canadian teaching hospital. The goal was to characterize length of stay (LOS) in low-risk patients and to identify variables that correlate with patients who were hospitalized longer than expected.
Data were collected on 255 patients. The mean LOS was 7.2+/-7.7 days (median 5.0 days [interquartile range 3.5 days]). A total of 179 patients (70%) had a Zwolle score of 3 or lower, identifying them as low risk. There was one death in the low-risk group (0.6% 30-day mortality) and 15 deaths in the higher-risk group (19.7% 30-day mortality), validating the Zwolle score in the population. A contraindication to early discharge was identified in 34 of the low-risk patients. Among the 144 remaining low-risk patients, the mean LOS was 5.1+/-3.3 days (median 4.0 days [interquartile range 3.0 days]). Only 8% were discharged within 48 h and only 28% within 72 h. It was determined that fewer patients were discharged on weekends and Wednesdays (when medical residents were away for teaching) than on other weekdays. LOS was longer among patients who were discharged on warfarin (7.6 days versus 4.6 days, P=0.006), and among patients who were transferred back to their presenting hospital rather than being discharged directly from the hospital where PCI was performed (5.6 days versus 4.0 days, P
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Mar 16;342(11):749-5510717009
Cites: Circulation. 2000 Oct 24;102(17):2031-711044416
Cites: Heart. 2002 Mar;87(3):216-911847156
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Jan;24(2):182-912573275
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2003 Oct 27;163(19):2345-5314581255
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Oct 18;357(16):1631-817942875
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Jun 8;109(22):2737-4315159293
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1988 Apr 28;318(17):1083-83281014
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 May 3;45(9):1397-40515862409
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Jun 6;47(11):2180-616750682
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2004 Mar 1;93(5):629-3214996596
PubMed ID
19812804 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Combined reperfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158907
Source
Kardiologiia. 2007;47(6):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
A V Shpektor
E Iu Vasil'eva
V G Artamonov
A G Bilich
R Iu Reztsov
Source
Kardiologiia. 2007;47(6):27-30
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Myocardial Reperfusion - methods
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Survival Rate
Thrombolytic Therapy - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Three schemes of treatment were used in the management of 230 patients with acute myocardial infarction: immediate thrombolysis (group 1, n=71), immediate thrombolysis followed by angioplasty in 12 hours-7 days depending of the clinical picture of the disease (group 2, n=65), primary angioplasty not later than 12 hours after onset of pain (group 3, n=94). Clopidogrel was given to all patients at least in 2 hours before primary angioplasty and no less than in 6 hours in combined reperfusion. Composite end point (total number of lethal outcomes and nonfatal reinfarctions) was significantly higher in group 1 (14.1%) compared with groups 2 (3.0%) and 3 (3.2%). Invasive intervention improved results of treatment after both effective and ineffective preceding thrombolytic therapy. Thus efficacy of combined reperfusion therapy is not inferior to primary angioplasty if interval between thrombolysis and invasive intervention varies between 12 hours and 7 days and angioplasty is carried out at the background of antiaggregant therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin.
PubMed ID
18260871 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparison of clinical outcomes between Canadian and American patients after nonurgent coronary stenting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177163
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Nov;20(13):1343-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Mina Madan
Marino Labinaz
Eric A Cohen
Christopher E Buller
Warren J Cantor
Peter Seidelin
John Ducas
Ronald G Carere
Madhu K Natarajan
Karen S Pieper
Gail E Hafley
J Conor O'Shea
Michael M Kitt
Robert M Califf
James E Tcheng
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mina.madan@sw.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Nov;20(13):1343-9
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - methods
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Disease - mortality - radiography - therapy
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex - administration & dosage
Probability
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics, nonparametric
Stents
Survival Analysis
Thrombolytic Therapy - methods
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Practice patterns for percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) may differ between Canada and the United States. Few data are available comparing PCI outcomes between the two countries in the era of coronary stenting and adjunctive glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibition.
In the Enhanced Suppression of the Platelet IIb/IIIa Receptor with Integrilin Therapy (ESPRIT) trial, 2064 patients were randomly assigned to receive eptifibatide or placebo during nonurgent PCI. The 30-day and one-year rates of death, myocardial infarction (MI) and target vessel revascularization (TVR) were compared between Canadian and American patients enrolled in the ESPRIT trial.
There were 1531 American patients and 533 Canadian patients enrolled. Americans were older and heavier, and had a higher incidence of cardiac risk factors than Canadians (P
PubMed ID
15570357 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of outcomes in patients with versus without diabetes mellitus after revascularization with everolimus- and sirolimus-eluting stents (from the SORT OUT IV trial).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120882
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2012 Dec 1;110(11):1585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2012
Author
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Per Thayssen
Anders Junker
Michael Maeng
Hans-Henrik Tilsted
Anne Kaltoft
Knud Nørregaard Hansen
Evald Høj Christiansen
Steen Dalby Kristensen
Jan Ravkilde
Morten Madsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Leif Thuesen
Jens Flensted Lassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. okkels@dadlnet.dk
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2012 Dec 1;110(11):1585-91
Date
Dec-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - methods
Coronary Artery Disease - complications - mortality - surgery
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - pharmacology
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Sirolimus - analogs & derivatives - pharmacology
Survival Rate - trends
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Diabetes is associated with increased risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) after percutaneous coronary intervention. The purpose of this substudy of the SORT OUT IV trial was to compare clinical outcomes in patients with and without diabetes mellitus treated with everolimus-eluting stents (EESs) or sirolimus-eluting stents (SESs). In total 2,774 patients (390 with diabetes, 14.1%) were randomized to stent implantation with EESs (n = 1,390, diabetes in 14.0%) or SESs (n = 1,384, diabetes in 14.2%). Randomization was stratified by presence/absence of diabetes. The primary end point was MACEs, a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, definite stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization within 18 months. MACEs were higher in diabetic than in nondiabetic patients (13.1% vs 6.4%, hazard ratio [HR] 2.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.51 to 2.86). In diabetic patients, MACEs were seen in 10.3% of those treated with EESs and in 15.8% of those treated with SESs (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.11). In nondiabetic patients, MACEs occurred in 6.6% of EES-treated and in 6.3% SES-treated patients (HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.46). In diabetics, cardiac death occurred in 3.1% of EES-treated and in 4.6% of SES-treated patients (HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.24 to 1.89), myocardial infarction occurred in 0.5% of EES-treated and in 3.6% of SES-treated patients (HR 0.14, 95% CI 0.02 to 1.16), and clinically driven target lesion revascularization was needed in 3.1% of EES-treated and in 7.7% of SES-treated patients (HR 0.40, 95% CI 0.15 to 1.02). No interaction between diabetes status and type of drug-eluting stent was found for the end points. In conclusion, patients with diabetes have higher MACE rates than nondiabetics. No significant differences in safety or efficacy outcomes after EES or SES implantation were present in nondiabetic or diabetic patients.
Notes
Comment In: Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther. 2013 Feb;11(2):151-423405836
PubMed ID
22959714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Detection by near-infrared spectroscopy of large lipid cores at culprit sites in patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275631
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Nov 15;86(6):1014-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2015
Author
Ryan D Madder
Mustafa Husaini
Alan T Davis
Stacie VanOosterhout
Jan Harnek
Matthias Götberg
David Erlinge
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Nov 15;86(6):1014-21
Date
Nov-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angina, Unstable - diagnosis - therapy
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - methods
Cohort Studies
Coronary Angiography - methods
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - therapy
Electrocardiography - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - therapy
Plaque, Atherosclerotic - diagnosis - therapy
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared - methods
Sweden
Abstract
This study was performed to assess the lipid burden of culprit lesions in non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (non-STEMI) and unstable angina (UA).
A recent intracoronary near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study showed 85% of STEMI culprit lesions have a maximum lipid core burden index in 4-mm (maxLCBI(4mm))?=?400. Whether culprit lesions in non-STEMI and UA are characterized by a similarly large lipid burden is unknown.
We studied 81 non-STEMI and UA patients undergoing culprit vessel NIRS imaging before stenting. Culprit segments were compared to all nonoverlapping 10-mm nonculprit segments for maxLCBI(4mm). Culprit segments in non-STEMI and UA were compared for the frequency of maxLCBI(4mm) =?400.
Among 81 patients (53.1% non-STEMI, 46.9% UA), non-STEMI culprit segments had a 3.4-fold greater maxLCBI(4mm) than nonculprits (448?±?229 vs 132?±?154, P?
Notes
Comment In: Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Nov 15;86(6):1022-326541802
PubMed ID
25418711 View in PubMed
Less detail

Developing a system of care for emergency revascularization in acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143442
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):266
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010

49 records – page 1 of 5.