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[8,500 patients in clinical trials. Experiences from a study in primary health care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54911
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Mar 23;91(12):1236-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-23-1994

[A comparative analysis of the results of using different methods of helium-neon laser therapy in patients with stable stenocardia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11296
Source
Lik Sprava. 1996 Jan-Feb;(1-2):73-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
V M Iurlov
I H Kul'baba
Source
Lik Sprava. 1996 Jan-Feb;(1-2):73-6
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - drug therapy - metabolism - radiotherapy
Antithrombin III - metabolism - radiation effects
Chronic Disease
Combined Modality Therapy
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Evaluation Studies
Humans
Lasers - therapeutic use
Liver - metabolism - radiation effects
Nitroglycerin - therapeutic use
Vasodilator Agents - therapeutic use
alpha 1-Antitrypsin - metabolism - radiation effects
alpha-Macroglobulins - metabolism - radiation effects
Abstract
Based on the findings from the examination of 133 patients with stable angina pectoris, it was shown that He-Ne laser therapy with the irradiation being applied to the liver projection area in combination with the prolonged-action nitrates is superior to similar application of irradiation to the precordial region and Head's zones or intravenous irradiation of blood. Revealed in the examination of the above patients was a reaction of antiproteolytic enzymes to He-Ne laser therapy, which appeared to be varying with methods of laser therapy. It is suggested that a reaction of the realization of the components of proteolysis might be involved in the realization of therapeutic effect of the He-Ne laser energy in patients with ischemic heart disease.
PubMed ID
9005112 View in PubMed
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Age and gender differences in left ventricular function among patients with stable angina and a matched control group. A report from the Angina Prognosis Study in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11210
Source
Cardiology. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):287-93
Publication Type
Article
Author
S V Eriksson
I. Björkander
C. Held
P. Hjemdahl
L. Forslund
N. Rehnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
Cardiology. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):287-93
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Age Factors
Aged
Angina Pectoris - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Blood Pressure - physiology
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Double-Blind Method
Echocardiography, Doppler
Electrocardiography
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Metoprolol - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Ventricular Function, Left - physiology
Verapamil - therapeutic use
Abstract
To assess left ventricular systolic and diastolic function, M-mode (n = 675) and transmitral Doppler echocardiography (n = 358) were performed in patients with stable angina pectoris and compared with 50 matched healthy controls. Left ventricular fractional shortening (FS) was significantly lower in male than in female patients (32 +/- 7 vs. 35 +/- 7%, p
PubMed ID
8793161 View in PubMed
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Ambient carbon monoxide may influence heart rate variability in subjects with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177018
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Dec;46(12):1217-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Robert Dales
Author Affiliation
HECSB/SEP/ECB/AHED/AQHER, Ottawa, Health Canada Air Quality-Health Effects Research Section, Health Canada, 275 Slater Street, 7th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0L2. rdales@ohri.ca
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Dec;46(12):1217-21
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - drug therapy - epidemiology
Carbon Monoxide - analysis - toxicity
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Abstract
Days of high ambient carbon dioxide (CO) have been associated with increased hospital admissions for cardiac disease. This study was conducted to determine if daily concentrations of CO and fine particulates (PM2.5) are associated with daily changes in heart rate variability.
Each of 36 adults with coronary artery disease had personal exposure to PM2.5 and CO measured along with heart rate variability for one 24-hour period each week for up to 10 weeks.
Among those not taking beta-receptor blockers, there was a positive association between the standard deviation of the R-to-R intervals and CO (P = 0.02). No effect was found for PM2.5.
Urban exposure to CO may exert a biologic effect on the heart, which may be modified by medications.
PubMed ID
15591973 View in PubMed
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[Are the recommendations of the drug committee followed? A comparison of the prescribing pattern of anti-angina drugs in general practice and hospitals in relation to the recommendations]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55231
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Aug 19;153(34):2333-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-1991
Author
H. Salomonsen
V. Beierholm
Author Affiliation
Centralsygehuset i Holbaek, medicinsk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Aug 19;153(34):2333-5
Date
Aug-19-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - drug therapy
Comparative Study
Denmark
Drug Utilization
English Abstract
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The object of this investigation was to describe the choice of recommended/non-recommended anti-anginal preparations in a group of patients in a hospital and prescribed by the general practitioner on discharge and during the subsequent three years. Eighty-nine patients participated in the investigation. Sixty-nine of these received medicinal treatment at the conclusion of the period. The investigation demonstrates that the recommendations by the Danish Drug Committee were followed in 90% of the cases during the last year of observation. It is concluded that the activities of the Danish Drug Committee may influence the choice of anti-anginal preparations on discharge from hospital and during the subsequent three years.
PubMed ID
1897041 View in PubMed
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Assessment of blindness in the Danish Verapamil Infarction Trial II (DAVIT II). Danish Study Group on Verapamil in Myocardial Infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55380
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1990;39(1):75-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C M Jespersen
Author Affiliation
Medical Department II, Kommunehospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1990;39(1):75-6
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Angina Pectoris - drug therapy
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - physiopathology
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research Design
Verapamil - therapeutic use
Abstract
In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study comparing verapamil and placebo in late secondary intervention after acute myocardial infarction, the physicians were asked to try to identify the treatment in 100 consecutive patients. The assessment of the presumed treatment was based upon the presence of effects and side effects. It was only possible correctly to group 36% (95%: 26.7-46.2) of the patients. 35 patients were grouped as indeterminable. In 65 a treatment was proposed, correctly in 55%, and thus ideal blindedness had been achieved.
PubMed ID
2276391 View in PubMed
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At the dawn of a new era in treating angina pectoris, or just another antianginal drug? Some considerations about ranolazine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101944
Source
Rom J Intern Med. 2010;48(4):361-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
H. Balan
Author Affiliation
"Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medical Clinic, Clinical Emergency Hospital Ilfov County, Bucharest, Romania. drhoriabalan@yahoo.com
Source
Rom J Intern Med. 2010;48(4):361-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetanilides - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Angina Pectoris - drug therapy
Enzyme Inhibitors - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Humans
Piperazines - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Recurrence - prevention & control
Abstract
Ranolazine is a new compound that has been approved by the FDA for use in patients who have chronic stable angina refractory to conventional antianginal medications. Ranolazine proved to be effective also as monotherapy in patients with stable angina and as part of a combination regimen. This review is inspired by the presentation that legendary figures in contemporary cardiology, such as Braunwald, Komajda and Camm made recently at the Congress of the European Society of Cardiology held in Stockholm, Sweden, last September.
PubMed ID
21528766 View in PubMed
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Buccal versus sublingual glyceryl trinitrate administration in the treatment of angina pectoris. A Swedish multicentre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12633
Source
Drugs. 1987;33 Suppl 4:96-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
L. Rydén
Source
Drugs. 1987;33 Suppl 4:96-9
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Administration, Oral
Angina Pectoris - drug therapy - prevention & control
Clinical Trials
Humans
Nitroglycerin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Random Allocation
Sweden
Abstract
126 patients with chronic exercise-induced angina, who were accustomed to the use of sublingual glyceryl trinitrate, were entered into a multicentre 2-week crossover comparison of sublingual (Nitromex) and buccal (Suscard) formulations of glyceryl trinitrate. Before randomisation the patients underwent a training period when doses of the buccal formulation were individualised. There were 31% fewer attacks with the buccal formulation, and more patients reported higher physical activity on the buccal compared with the sublingual formulation (30% vs 16%). The buccal formulation was also more effective when glyceryl trinitrate was used prophylactically to prevent expected attacks, being effective in 74% of attempts compared with 66% for the sublingual formulation (p less than 0.05). More patients preferred the buccal route of administration for prophylactic use (81% vs 4%, p less than 0.05). Similarly, when asked to select which they would use in future, 65% of patients preferred the buccal formulations (p less than 0.05), 19% preferred sublingual glyceryl trinitrate, and 16% did not express any preference.
PubMed ID
3113913 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical factors associated with initiation of and persistence with ADP receptor-inhibiting oral antiplatelet treatment after acute coronary syndrome: a nationwide cohort study from Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287522
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 Nov 22;6(11):e012604
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-22-2016
Author
Tuire Prami
Houssem Khanfir
Anna Deleskog
Pål Hasvold
Ville Kytö
Eeva Reissell
Juhani Airaksinen
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 Nov 22;6(11):e012604
Date
Nov-22-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - drug therapy
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - drug therapy
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Patient Selection
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists - therapeutic use
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To study patient selection for and persistence with ADP receptor-inhibiting oral antiplatelet (OAP) treatment after acute coronary syndrome (ACS).
Observational, retrospective, cohort study linking real-life patient-level register data.
Nationwide drug usage study using data of patients with ACS discharged from hospitals in Finland.
The study population consisted of 54 416 patients (aged =18 years) following hospital admission for unstable angina pectoris or myocardial infarction during 2009-2013. Patients were classified as either OAP or non-OAP users based on drug purchases within 7 days of discharge.
Initiation of and a 12-month persistence with OAP medication.
In total, 49% of patients with ACS received OAP treatment after hospital discharge. Women represented 40% of the population, but only 32% of them became OAP users (adjusted OR for initiation compared with men 0.8; p38% and p20 percentage points for each).
Only half of the patients with ACS received guideline-recommended ADP receptor-inhibiting OAP treatment after hospital discharge, suggesting suboptimal treatment practices. Non-PCI-treated patients and patients with increased age, unstable angina, dementia or atrial fibrillation appear to have the highest risk of deficient treatment with OAPs. OAP users, however, showed good compliance during drug usage.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27881527 View in PubMed
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62 records – page 1 of 7.