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The Adolescent Unresolved Attachment Questionnaire: the assessment of perceptions of parental abdication of caregiving behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196336
Source
J Genet Psychol. 2000 Dec;161(4):493-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
M. West
S. Rose
S. Spreng
K. Adam
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Genet Psychol. 2000 Dec;161(4):493-503
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Anger
Fear
Female
Humans
Male
Object Attachment
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Psychological Tests
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Abstract
This article reports on the Adolescent Unresolved Attachment Questionnaire (AUAQ), a brief questionnaire that assesses the caregiving experiences of unresolved adolescents (as recipients of caregiving). The AUAQ was developed and validated in a large normative sample (n = 691) and a sample of 133 adolescents in psychiatric treatment. It is a self-report questionnaire consisting of 3 scales with Likert-type responses ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree. The Aloneness/Failed Protection Scale assesses the adolescent's perception of the care provided by the attachment figure. The Fear Scale taps the fear generated by the adolescent's appraisal of failed attachment figure care. The Anger/Dysregulation Scale assesses negative affective responses to the perceived lack of care from the attachment figure. All scales demonstrated satisfactory internal reliability and agreement between scores for adolescents (n = 91) from the normative sample who completed the AUAQ twice. Adolescents in the clinical sample also completed the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; C. George, N. Kaplan, & M. Main, 1984/1985/1996); the AUAQ demonstrated high convergent validity with the AAI.
PubMed ID
11117104 View in PubMed
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Emotional distress and coping in the early stage of recovery following acute traumatic hand injury: a questionnaire survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83282
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Jul;43(5):557-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Gustafsson Margareta
Ahlström Gerd
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Orebro University, SE-701 82 Orebro, Sweden. margareta.gustafsson@ivo.oru.se
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Jul;43(5):557-65
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Anger
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Convalescence - psychology
Fear
Female
Hand Injuries - complications - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morale
Nursing Methodology Research
Problem Solving
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Risk factors
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Emotional distress is frequent in patients with acute traumatic hand injury during the first weeks after the accident. Knowledge of coping in relation to emotional distress could help to identify those who need support. OBJECTIVES: To describe the different kinds of coping used by patients in the early stage of recovery following an acute traumatic hand injury and to investigate differences in coping patterns in patients with and without symptoms of emotional distress. DESIGN: Questionnaire survey with a descriptive and comparative design. Setting/participants: A total of 112 patients with acute traumatic hand injury requiring inpatient treatment at the hand surgical clinic. Those with injuries caused by a suicide attempt or with known drug abuse were excluded. Method/main outcome measures: The patients answered a postal questionnaire at home 1-2 weeks after the accident. Emotional distress was assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale. Coping was measured with the Jalowiec Coping Scale-40. RESULTS: Coping by "trying to keep the situation under control" and "trying to look at the problems objectively and see all sides" were most frequent. These strategies are typical for the confrontive coping style, which dominated in the actual illness-situation. Symptoms of emotional distress occurred in 32% of the patients. These patients used significantly more kinds of coping strategies and used confrontive and emotive coping strategies more often than the others. Coping by "hoping for improvement", "working tension off with physical activity", "trying to put the problem out of one's mind", "worrying", "getting nervous or angry" and "taking off by one self" were associated with emotional distress. Coping by "accepting the situation as it is" and "thinking that it is nothing to worry about" were more frequent in patients without emotional distress. CONCLUSIONS: Observations of the coping strategies associated with emotional distress in this study could help to identify patients in clinical practice that need nursing support. Coping associated with less emotional distress should be encouraged.
PubMed ID
16150449 View in PubMed
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Emotional reactions of parents after the birth of an infant with extremely low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58158
Source
J Child Health Care. 2005 Jun;9(2):122-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Birgitta Sandén Eriksson
Gunnel Pehrsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
J Child Health Care. 2005 Jun;9(2):122-36
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anger
Anxiety - etiology
Attitude to Health
Confusion - etiology
Emotions
Fear
Female
Focus Groups
Gestational Age
Grief
Hospitals, Pediatric
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Negativism
Neonatal Nursing
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - education - psychology
Social Support
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Emotional reactions of parents after the birth of an extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infant were followed during the early period of hospital care. Ten pairs of parents participated. The process concerning feelings of sadness, anger, fear/anxiety and joy was measured by Single Systems Design (SSD). The infants were born in gestation weeks 23-27. The emotional reactions of the mothers and fathers did not differ significantly. There was emotional confusion during the first weeks of parenthood, then the negative feelings decreased and joy increased. But at the end of a long period of care, the negative feelings reappeared. It is important to be aware that the first weeks after birth can be marked by emotional confusion and that negative feelings can return when the infant's medical status has been brought under control. The latter might be explained emotionally as a delayed crisis reaction.
PubMed ID
15961367 View in PubMed
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Experience of being the spouse/cohabitant of a person with bipolar affective disorder: a cumulative process over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86957
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):5-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Tranvåg Oscar
Kristoffersen Kjell
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Department of Nursing, Bergen University College, Bergen, Norway. otr@hib.no
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):5-18
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Anger
Attitude to Health
Bipolar Disorder - prevention & control - psychology
Cost of Illness
Fear
Female
Grief
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Life Change Events
Loneliness
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Norway
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Stereotyping
Abstract
The aim of the study was to identify and describe spouses'/cohabitants' experiences of living with a partner with bipolar affective disorder over time. Qualitative research interviews were conducted with eight spouses/cohabitants. Transcribed interviews were analysed structurally based on Ricoeur's phenomenological hermeneutics as described by Lindseth and Norberg. The participants' shared lives ranged from 6 to 51 years, and the study found three major aspects that characterized their experience along this time-dimension; experience formed part of a cumulative process containing up to 14 experiences. Each experience created a preunderstanding that affected how subsequent experiences were perceived, and mastered. These three major aspects had a reciprocal influence on the following 14 experiences over time: Fear and the incomprehensible. Accusations. Self-doubt and doubt about own powers of judgement. Care and information vs. being overlooked or turned away by health personnel. Stigmatization and loss of social network. Uncertainty, powerlessness and hope. Loneliness. Anger and despair. The persistent threat. Own health problems. Grief over loss. Dawning acceptance. Reconciliation. New hope. A theoretical understanding using gestalt therapy theory suggests that burdensome experience can be seen as an inner imbalance in the spouse/cohabitant when she/he cannot find meaning in their experiences. When only parts of the whole are perceived, an incomplete gestalt is formed in the person's lived-experience that counteracts the equilibrium of the organism. Insight and meaning can protect them against burdensome experiences and nurses can empower them through care, health-promoting education and guidance. Nursing research should develop methods of education and guidance sensitive enough to help each spouse/cohabitant, regardless of where they are in their cumulative process.
PubMed ID
18269418 View in PubMed
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Feeling threatened about the future: Whites' emotional reactions to anticipated ethnic demographic changes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132151
Source
Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2012 Jan;38(1):14-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
H Robert Outten
Michael T Schmitt
Daniel A Miller
Amber L Garcia
Author Affiliation
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada. routten@sfu.ca
Source
Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2012 Jan;38(1):14-25
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anger
British Columbia
Continental Population Groups - psychology
Demography
Emotions
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Fear
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Minority Groups - psychology
Prejudice
Race Relations - psychology
Social Adjustment
Social Identification
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
In many Western countries, the proportion of the population that is White will drop below 50% within the next century. Two experiments examined how anticipation of these future ethnic demographics affects current intergroup processes. In Study 1, White Americans who viewed actual demographic projections for a time when Whites are no longer a numerical majority felt more angry toward and fearful of ethnic minorities than Whites who did not view future projections. Whites who viewed the future projections also felt more sympathy for their ingroup than Whites in the control condition. In Study 2, the authors replicated the effects for intergroup emotions with a sample of White Canadians. White Canadians who thought about a future in which Whites were a numerical minority appraised the ingroup as more threatened, which mediated the effect of condition on intergroup emotions. The authors discuss the implications of these findings for race relations in increasingly diverse societies.
PubMed ID
21844094 View in PubMed
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Nursing the social wound: public health nurses' experiences of screening for woman abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165231
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2006 Dec;38(4):136-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Fiona Webster
Michelle Sangster Bouck
Bonnie Lynn Wright
Pam Dietrich
Author Affiliation
London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2006 Dec;38(4):136-53
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Anger
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Fear
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Helping Behavior
Humans
Mass Screening - methods - nursing
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Assessment - methods
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Ontario
Public Health Nursing - education - methods
Qualitative Research
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of public health nurses (PHNs) who screen for woman abuse within their clinical practice. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 11 PHNs. There was a great deal of variability in participants' level of experience in working with abused women. The results reveal that nurse readiness is an important factor in screening for woman abuse. The authors describe a number of steps participants appeared to grapple with in order to become comfortable working with abused women, including coming to terms with abuse, asking the question, bearing witness, and "walking with" the client. As the PHN became increasingly comfortable working with abused women, she came to redefine success. Her client's personal growth over time, rather than the single act of leaving an abusive relationship, now defined a successful client interaction. The authors also discuss implications for practice that arise from these accounts.
PubMed ID
17290959 View in PubMed
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Patients' and relatives' thoughts and actions during and after symptom presentation for an acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87559
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2007 Dec;6(4):280-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Henriksson C.
Lindahl B.
Larsson M.
Author Affiliation
Uppsala Clinical Research Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, SE 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. catrin.henriksson@ucr.uu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2007 Dec;6(4):280-6
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Ambulances
Anger
Coronary Care Units
Decision Making
Family - psychology
Fear
Female
Focus Groups
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Care - methods - psychology
Social Support
Sweden
Time Factors
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Relatives play an important role in deciding to seek medical care after the onset of symptoms of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to gain deeper understanding of how AMI patients and their relatives think and act during and after onset of symptoms. METHODS: Six focus group interviews were conducted with AMI patients (N=13) and relatives (N=14). Manifest content analysis was used to analyse the transcribed data. RESULTS: The AMI patients experienced a variety of symptoms and both patients and relatives often felt uncertain about the origin of the symptoms, interpreted them as less serious conditions and tried to alleviate the discomfort in various ways. When symptoms continued the patients consulted a relative, who often decided to seek care. Many considered waiting for an ambulance was too long and the relative often drove the patients to the hospital. CONCLUSION: Patients as well as relatives were insecure about AMI symptoms and how to act. All patients contacted a relative, who was more eager than the patient to seek help. Many preferred to go in their own car to the hospital, believing it to be faster than an ambulance. Information about AMI symptoms and recommended action should be given to the public and to AMI patients and their relatives.
PubMed ID
17478122 View in PubMed
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Positive shifts in the perceived meaning of cardiac pain following a psychoeducation program for chronic stable angina.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162056
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2007 Jun;39(2):48-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Michael McGillion
Judy Watt-Watson
Sandra LeFort
Bonnie Stevens
Author Affiliation
Lawrence Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michael.mcgillion@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2007 Jun;39(2):48-65
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anger
Angina Pectoris - complications
Attitude to Health
Canada
Chest Pain - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Chronic Disease
Fear
Female
Frustration
Humans
Male
Negativism
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Relaxation Therapy
Self Care - methods - psychology
Self Efficacy
Abstract
This study examined the meaning of cardiac pain for chronic stable angina (CSA) patients who participated in a standardized angina psychoeducation program. The patients documented what angina meant to them at sessions 1 and 6 of a 6-week standardized psychoeducation program aimed at enhancing CSA self-management. At session 1, angina was described as a major negative life change characterized by fear, frustration, limitations, and anger. At session 6, angina signified a broad and ongoing pain problem requiring continual self-management in order to maximize quality of life. The findings suggest that the perceived meaning of angina as a burdensome and debilitating life change shifts, during psychoeducation, to one of angina as a broad pain problem requiring ongoing self-management in order to preserve life goals and functioning. How such perceptual shifts in the meaning of cardiac pain might contribute to the overall effectiveness of psychoedcuation warrants further investigation.
PubMed ID
17679585 View in PubMed
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Verbal abuse: a problem for pediatric nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172400
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Aug;31(4):271-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Annette R Pejic
Author Affiliation
School of Community and Liberal Studies, Sheridan College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning, Brampton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Aug;31(4):271-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Anger
Attitude of Health Personnel
Fear
Female
Humans
Incidence
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Morale
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Occupational Health
Ontario
Pediatric Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Social Behavior
Social Support
Statistics, nonparametric
Verbal Behavior
Abstract
This descriptive study investigated the experience of verbal abuse among a voluntary sample of registered pediatric nurses working in six hospitals in Eastern Ontario (N=35), over a six week period. Roy's Adaptation Model was used as the conceptual framework for this study. A questionnaire was used to ascertain the incidence, source, level of reporting, and personal and professional reactions of verbal abuse in this specific population. Analysis and treatment of data included descriptive statistics and Spearman Correlation tests. Pediatric nurses were the frequent victims of verbal abuse. Patients, parents/visitors, and physicians were equally ranked as the most common perpetrators. There was distinct lack of reporting of verbal abuse. Reasons reported included (a) the incident was not important enough, and (b) the situation was handled/resolved. An increase in stress level and decreased job morale were among the most frequently perceived personal and professional reactions of verbal abuse.
PubMed ID
16229123 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.