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Acute depressed mood as a trigger of acute coronary syndromes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81829
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2006 Oct 15;60(8):837-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2006
Author
Steptoe Andrew
Strike Philip C
Perkins-Porras Linda
McEwan Jean R
Whitehead Daisy L
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. a.steptoe@ucl.ac.uk
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2006 Oct 15;60(8):837-42
Date
Oct-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Affect - physiology
Aged
Anger - physiology
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Cross-Over Studies
Depression - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Income
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some cases of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) may be triggered by emotional states such as anger, but it is not known if acute depressed mood can act as a trigger. METHODS: 295 men and women with a verified ACS were studied. Depressed mood in the two hours before ACS symptom onset was compared with the same period 24 hours earlier (pair-matched analysis), and with usual levels of depressed mood, using case-crossover methods. RESULTS: 46 (18.2%) patients experienced depressed mood in the two hours before ACS onset. The odds of ACS following depressed mood were 2.50 (95% confidence intervals 1.05 to 6.56) in the pair-matched analysis, while the relative risk of ACS onset following depressed mood was 4.33 (95% confidence intervals 3.39 to 6.11) compared with usual levels of depressed mood. Depressed mood preceding ACS onset was more common in lower income patients (p = .032), and was associated with recent life stress, but was not related to psychiatric status. CONCLUSIONS: Acute depressed mood may elicit biological responses that contribute to ACS, including vascular endothelial dysfunction, inflammatory cytokine release and platelet activation. Acute depressed mood may trigger potentially life-threatening cardiac events.
PubMed ID
16780810 View in PubMed
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The Adolescent Unresolved Attachment Questionnaire: the assessment of perceptions of parental abdication of caregiving behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196336
Source
J Genet Psychol. 2000 Dec;161(4):493-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
M. West
S. Rose
S. Spreng
K. Adam
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Genet Psychol. 2000 Dec;161(4):493-503
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Anger
Fear
Female
Humans
Male
Object Attachment
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Psychological Tests
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Abstract
This article reports on the Adolescent Unresolved Attachment Questionnaire (AUAQ), a brief questionnaire that assesses the caregiving experiences of unresolved adolescents (as recipients of caregiving). The AUAQ was developed and validated in a large normative sample (n = 691) and a sample of 133 adolescents in psychiatric treatment. It is a self-report questionnaire consisting of 3 scales with Likert-type responses ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree. The Aloneness/Failed Protection Scale assesses the adolescent's perception of the care provided by the attachment figure. The Fear Scale taps the fear generated by the adolescent's appraisal of failed attachment figure care. The Anger/Dysregulation Scale assesses negative affective responses to the perceived lack of care from the attachment figure. All scales demonstrated satisfactory internal reliability and agreement between scores for adolescents (n = 91) from the normative sample who completed the AUAQ twice. Adolescents in the clinical sample also completed the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; C. George, N. Kaplan, & M. Main, 1984/1985/1996); the AUAQ demonstrated high convergent validity with the AAI.
PubMed ID
11117104 View in PubMed
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Age and vengeance as predictors of mild driver aggression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176072
Source
Violence Vict. 2004 Aug;19(4):469-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Dwight A Hennessy
David L Wiesenthal
Author Affiliation
Buffalo State College, NY, USA. hennesda@buffalostate.edu
Source
Violence Vict. 2004 Aug;19(4):469-77
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aggression - psychology
Anger
Automobile Driving - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Ontario
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Violence
Abstract
The present study examined the influence of driver age and vengeance on mild aggression among drivers with at least 5 years experience. Mild aggression decreased with age among low vengeance drivers and changed little across age groups among moderately vengeful drivers. However, mild driver aggression actually increased with age among highly vengeful drivers. Results are interpreted in terms of the aggressive nature of an enduring vengeful attitude.
PubMed ID
15726939 View in PubMed
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Anger and effortful control moderate aggressogenic thought-behaviour associations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282877
Source
Cogn Emot. 2016 08;30(5):1008-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
08-2016
Author
Sanna Roos
Ernest V E Hodges
Kätlin Peets
Christina Salmivalli
Source
Cogn Emot. 2016 08;30(5):1008-16
Date
08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression - psychology
Anger
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Self-Control - psychology
Thinking
Abstract
The effects of anger and effortful control on aggressogenic thought-behaviour associations were investigated among a total of 311 Finnish fifth and sixth graders (mean age = 11.9 years). Self-reported aggressive cognitions (i.e., normative- and self-efficacy beliefs about aggression) were expected to be associated with higher peer-reported aggressive behaviour. Teacher reported anger and effortful control were hypothesised, and found, to moderate the effects of aggressive cognitions on aggression, such that the effects were strongest for children who were high in anger and low in effortful control, as compared to other conditions. Furthermore, under the conditions of high anger and high effortful control, self-efficacy was negatively related to aggression. Thus, aggression is a result of a complex, hierarchically organised motivational system, being jointly influenced by aggressive cognitions, anger and effortful control. The findings support the importance of examining cognitive and emotional structures jointly when predicting children's aggressive behaviour.
PubMed ID
26042460 View in PubMed
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Anger expression and incident hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203695
Source
Psychosom Med. 1998 Nov-Dec;60(6):730-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
S A Everson
D E Goldberg
G A Kaplan
J. Julkunen
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. severson@umich.edu
Source
Psychosom Med. 1998 Nov-Dec;60(6):730-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anger
Coronary Disease - psychology
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
It has long been thought that anger is important in the development of essential hypertension. However, tests of this hypothesis have yielded conflicting findings. This study prospectively examined the relationship between anger expression style and incident hypertension in a population sample of middle-aged men.
Participants were 537 initially normotensive men from eastern Finland, who completed a medical examination and series of psychological questionnaires at baseline and at 4-year follow-up. Anger expression was assessed by Spielberger's Anger-out and Anger-in scales.
At follow-up, 104 men (19.4%) were hypertensive (blood pressure > or = 165 mm Hg systolic and/or 95 mm Hg diastolic). Age-adjusted logistic regression analyses revealed that each 1-point increase in Anger-out was associated with a 12% increase in risk of hypertension after 4 years of follow-up (p
PubMed ID
9847033 View in PubMed
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Anger is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in low SES but not in higher SES men and women. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160793
Source
J Behav Med. 2008 Feb;31(1):35-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Päivi Merjonen
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Sampsa Puttonen
Pertti Keskivaara
Markus Juonala
Risto Telama
Jorma Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 9, 00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Behav Med. 2008 Feb;31(1):35-44
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Anger
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hostility
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Psychological Tests
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated the associations of anger and cynicism with carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and whether these associations were moderated by childhood or adulthood socioeconomic status (SES). The participants were 647 men and 893 women derived from the population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Childhood SES was measured in 1980 when the participants were aged 3-18. In 2001, adulthood SES, anger, cynicism, and IMT were measured. There were no associations between anger or cynicism and IMT in the entire population, but anger was associated with thicker IMT in participants who had experienced low SES in childhood. This association persisted after adjustment for a host of cardiovascular risk factors. It is concluded that the ill health-effects of psychological factors such as anger may be more pronounced in individuals who have been exposed to adverse socioeconomic circumstances early in life.
PubMed ID
17940862 View in PubMed
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Anger over HIV questions cancels blood clinic at Ottawa university.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208681
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Apr 15;156(8):1181-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1997
Author
C. Gray
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Apr 15;156(8):1181-3
Date
Apr-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anger
Blood Donors
Canada
HIV Infections - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Homosexuality
Humans
Mass Screening - methods
Ontario
Questionnaires
Red Cross
Abstract
Ottawa's Carleton University cancelled a February blood-donor clinic after the Red Cross failed to hold sensitivity-training sessions for its volunteers. The sessions were requested after students complained that the organization's screening procedures are insensitive and offend gay students. The Red Cross maintains that rigorous screening, including questions about high-risk sexual behaviour, is essential if the blood supply is to be protected. In March a compromise was announced: the Red Cross will begin sensitivity training for its volunteer workers in April and blood-donor clinics will return to Carleton in the fall.
PubMed ID
9141993 View in PubMed
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Anger-provoking events and intention to turnover in hospital administrators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143917
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2010;24(1):45-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Karen Harlos
Author Affiliation
Department of Business and Administration, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Canada. ka.harlos@uwinnipeg.ca
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2010;24(1):45-56
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anger
Canada
Career Mobility
Data Collection
Hospital Administrators - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Personnel Loyalty
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to examine anger associated with types of negative work events experienced by health administrators and to examine the impact of anger on intent to leave.
Textual data analysis is used to measure anger in open-ended survey responses from administrative staff of a Canadian hospital. Multivariate regression is applied to predict anger from event type, on the one hand, and turnover intentions from anger, on the other.
Person-related negative events contributed to administrator anger more than policy-related events. Anger from events predicted turnover intentions after adjusting for numerous potential confounds.
Future studies using larger samples across multiple sites are needed to test the generalizability of results.
Results provide useful information for retention strategies through codifying respect and fairness in interactions and policies. Health organizations stand to gain efficiencies by helping administrators handle anger effectively, leading to more stable staffing levels and more pleasurable, productive work environments.
This paper addresses gaps in knowledge about determinants of turnover in this population by examining the impact of administrator anger on intent to leave and the work events which give rise to anger. Given the strategic importance of health administration work and the high costs to health organizations when administrators leave, results hold particular promise for health human resources.
PubMed ID
20429408 View in PubMed
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Annoyance and health symptoms and their influencing factors: a population-based air pollution intervention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89424
Source
Public Health. 2009 Apr;123(4):339-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Stenlund T.
Lidén E.
Andersson K.
Garvill J.
Nordin S.
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Public Health. 2009 Apr;123(4):339-45
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control
Anger
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Humans
Industry
Intervention Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Sweden
Urban health
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Interventions for reducing air pollution are important means for improving public health. The role of psychological factors in understanding annoyance and health symptoms due to air pollution is limited and further investigation is required. This study aimed to investigate the effects of an intervention to reduce air pollution (predominantly dust and soot) with respect to perceived pollution, risk perception, annoyance and health symptoms. Another objective was to test a model that describes inter-relations between air pollution, perceived pollution, health risk perception, annoyance and health symptoms. STUDY DESIGN: An interventional, population-based questionnaire study. METHODS: Surveys were performed before (pre-test) and after (post-test) closure of a sinter plant. Instead, pellets were shipped to the community's harbour for steel production. Individuals in the community aged 18-75 years were selected at random for participation in the pre-test (n=738; 74% of the sample participated) and post-test (n=684; 68% of the sample participated). The two samples were representative of the populations at the two points in time, and thus not identical. RESULTS: After the sinter plant was closed, the environment was perceived as being less dusty, the residents were more positive in their risk perception, and they reported less annoyance due to dust, soot and odorous substances. No difference was found for health symptoms between the pre-test and the post-test. Based on path analyses, a model is proposed of inter-relations between air pollution, perceived pollution, health risk perception, annoyance and health symptoms. CONCLUSION: The intervention was successful with respect to perceived dust and soot pollution; to annoyance attributed to dust, soot and odorous substances; and to risk perception. The path analyses suggest that perceived pollution and health risk perception play important roles in understanding and predicting environmentally induced annoyance and health symptoms.
PubMed ID
19344922 View in PubMed
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Annoyance, sleep and concentration problems due to combined traffic noise and the benefit of quiet side.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272613
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Feb;12(2):1612-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Theo Bodin
Jonas Björk
Jonas Ardö
Maria Albin
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Feb;12(2):1612-28
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anger
Attention
Female
Geographic Information Systems
Health Surveys
Housing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects - prevention & control
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sleep
Sweden
Abstract
Access to a quiet side in one's dwelling is thought to compensate for higher noise levels at the most exposed façade. It has also been indicated that noise from combined traffic sources causes more noise annoyance than equal average levels from either road traffic or railway noise separately.
2612 persons in Malmö, Sweden, answered to a residential environment survey including questions on outdoor environment, noise sensitivity, noise annoyance, sleep quality and concentration problems. Road traffic and railway noise was modeled using Geographic Information System.
Access to a quiet side, i.e., at least one window facing yard, water or green space, was associated with reduced risk of annoyance OR (95%CI) 0.47 (0.38-0.59), and concentration problems 0.76 (0.61-0.95). Bedroom window facing the same environment was associated to reduced risk of reporting of poor sleep quality 0.78 (0.64-1.00). Railway noise was associated with reduced risk of annoyance below 55 dB(A) but not at higher levels of exposure.
Having a window facing a yard, water or green space was associated to a substantially reduced risk of noise annoyance and concentration problems. If this window was the bedroom window, sleeping problems were less likely.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25642690 View in PubMed
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80 records – page 1 of 8.