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809 records – page 1 of 81.

[50-year experience with the surgical treatment of goiter in the Transcarpathian region]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39617
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1985 Feb;134(2):6-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985
Author
A V Fedinets
M N Polazhinets
A I Mikita
V M Bora
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1985 Feb;134(2):6-10
Date
Feb-1985
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anesthesia, Intratracheal
Child
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Goiter - surgery
Goiter, Endemic - surgery
Goiter, Nodular - surgery
Graves Disease - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuroleptanalgesia
Preoperative Care
Thyroidectomy - methods
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
The article generalizes experience with the surgical treatment of 1988 patients with different diseases of the thyroid gland. Indications for the surgical treatment, special preoperative management, choosing the anesthesia, methods and technique of the operation are discussed.
PubMed ID
3839100 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abstracts from the 14th Congress of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiologists. Uppsala, Sweden, June 28-July 2, 1977.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250477
Source
Ups J Med Sci Suppl. 1977;25:1-170
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1977

Abstracts from the 26th Congress of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. June 13-17, 2001. Tromso, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193791
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand Suppl. 2001 Jun;(115):1-79
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand Suppl. 2001 Jun;(115):1-79
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia
Anesthesiology
Humans
Intensive Care
PubMed ID
11491127 View in PubMed
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Academic performance in adolescence after inguinal hernia repair in infancy: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136563
Source
Anesthesiology. 2011 May;114(5):1076-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Tom G Hansen
Jacob K Pedersen
Steen W Henneberg
Dorthe A Pedersen
Jeffrey C Murray
Neil S Morton
Kaare Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. tomghansen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Anesthesiology. 2011 May;114(5):1076-85
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Anesthesia - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Causality
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Odds Ratio
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although animal studies have indicated that general anesthetics may result in widespread apoptotic neurodegeneration and neurocognitive impairment in the developing brain, results from human studies are scarce. We investigated the association between exposure to surgery and anesthesia for inguinal hernia repair in infancy and subsequent academic performance.
Using Danish birth cohorts from 1986-1990, we compared the academic performance of all children who had undergone inguinal hernia repair in infancy to a randomly selected, age-matched 5% population sample. Primary analysis compared average test scores at ninth grade adjusting for sex, birth weight, and paternal and maternal age and education. Secondary analysis compared the proportions of children not attaining test scores between the two groups.
From 1986-1990 in Denmark, 2,689 children underwent inguinal hernia repair in infancy. A randomly selected, age-matched 5% population sample consists of 14,575 individuals. Although the exposure group performed worse than the control group (average score 0.26 lower; 95% CI, 0.21-0.31), after adjusting for known confounders, no statistically significant difference (-0.04; 95% CI, -0.09 to 0.01) between the exposure and control groups could be demonstrated. However, the odds ratio for test score nonattainment associated with inguinal hernia repair was 1.18 (95% CI, 1.04-1.35). Excluding from analyses children with other congenital malformations, the difference in mean test scores remained nearly unchanged (0.05; 95% CI, 0.00-0.11). In addition, the increased proportion of test score nonattainment within the exposure group was attenuated (odds ratio = 1.13; 95% CI, 0.98-1.31).
In the ethnically and socioeconomically homogeneous Danish population, we found no evidence that a single, relatively brief anesthetic exposure in connection with hernia repair in infancy reduced academic performance at age 15 or 16 yr after adjusting for known confounding factors. However, the higher test score nonattainment rate among the hernia group could suggest that a subgroup of these children are developmentally disadvantaged compared with the background population.
Notes
Comment In: Anesthesiology. 2011 Dec;115(6):1387; author reply 1387-822108309
PubMed ID
21368654 View in PubMed
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[A case of malignant hyperthermia occuring in a dental clinic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247613
Source
Can Anaesth Soc J. 1979 Jan;26(1):55-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1979
Author
A. Martel
L. Spigelblatt
L. Perreault
R. Rosenfeld
Source
Can Anaesth Soc J. 1979 Jan;26(1):55-7
Date
Jan-1979
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, Dental - adverse effects
Anesthesia, General - adverse effects
Child, Preschool
Dental Clinics
Female
Genetic Counseling
Humans
Malignant Hyperthermia - etiology - genetics
Quebec
Abstract
Malignant hyperthermia, a life-threatening complication of anaesthesia, occurred in a 5 1/2-year-old girl undergoing dental surgery in a dental clinic. During induction, after 20 mg of succinylcholine, the anaesthetist noted a moderate rigidity of the mandible that did not interfere with the tracheal intubation. However, after 45 minutes, the temperature rose to 38.8 degrees C, pulse was rapid at 160 per minute and the child was slightly cyanosed. The diagnosis of malignant hyperthermia was made (the temperature eventually reached 40.8 degrees C). The child was immediately treated with refrigeration, procainamide and sodium bicarbonate. She was then moved to a hospital centre where the treatment was continued and she recovered completely. After extensive investigation, we found that the paternal grandfather of the child died at age 58, several hours after a bilateral lumbar sympathectomy under general anaesthesia. The cause of the death, as confirmed by hospital records, was malignant hyperthermia. No genetic counselling was given at that time; this omission has since been corrected. Early diagnosis and the availability on the premises of the necessary drugs and equipment to treat such a complication probably saved this child's life. In 1975, "La Corporation Professionnelle des Médecins du Québec" published standards for practice of anaesthesia outside a hospital setting. The compliance of the dental clinic with such standards has contributed to the avoidance of a catastrophe.
PubMed ID
761114 View in PubMed
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Accelerated onset of vecuronium neuromuscular block with pulmonary arterial administration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46523
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1994 Dec;41(12):1178-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
H. Iwasaki
M. Igarashi
S. Kawana
A. Namiki
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology, Sapporo Medical University, School of Medicine, Japan.
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1994 Dec;41(12):1178-80
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anesthesia, Intravenous
Catheterization, Peripheral
Comparative Study
Female
Fentanyl - administration & dosage
Heart Catheterization
Humans
Injections, Intra-Arterial
Male
Midazolam - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction - drug effects - physiology
Neuromuscular Junction - drug effects
Pulmonary Artery
Reaction Time - drug effects
Time Factors
Ulnar Nerve - drug effects - physiology
Vecuronium Bromide - administration & dosage
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the onset times of vecuronium neuromuscular block administered into either the central circulation or a peripheral vein. One hundred and twenty adult patients with a pulmonary artery (PA) catheter were randomly divided into one of three groups with respect to the routes of vecuronium administration (n = 40 in each group). Anaesthesia was induced with midazolam 2.5 mg iv and fentanyl 10-50 micrograms.kg-1 iv and maintained with intermittent doses of fentanyl 50 micrograms iv and nitrous oxide 60-70% in oxygen. After immobilization of the forearm in a splint, the ulnar nerve was stimulated supramaximally every 12 sec. The resulting force of the evoked thumb twitch was recorded (Myograph 2000, Biometer, Denmark). The times from the injection to the first depression of twitch response (latent onset) in patients given vecuronium 0.08 mg.kg-1 into the pulmonary artery, the right atrium, and a peripheral vein on the hand were 58.0 +/- 19.5, 71.5 +/- 17.1, and 82.4 +/- 18.0 sec (mean +/- SD), respectively. The latent onset of neuromuscular block occurred sooner in patients given vecuronium into the central vein than when administered into a vein on the hand (P
PubMed ID
7867112 View in PubMed
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[Acceptance of ambulatory laser conization under local anesthesia by Danish women]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24267
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Dec 7;154(50):3590-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-7-1992
Author
C F Thomsen
P E Helkjaer
J. Skovdal
P S Eriksen
Author Affiliation
Gynaekologisk obstetrisk afdeling, Centralsygehuset i Naestved.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Dec 7;154(50):3590-3
Date
Dec-7-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - methods - psychology
Anesthesia, Local
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Laser Surgery - adverse effects - methods - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia - surgery
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - surgery
Uterine Hemorrhage - etiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the acceptability of CO2 laser excisional conization for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia under local anaesthesia in an outpatient setting. Seventy-seven patients, who underwent this procedure, were interviewed three months later concerning pain during treatment, pain and bleeding in the immediate postoperative period, and their general opinion about this procedure. The median duration of surgery was 11 minutes. The postoperative median observation time was 90 minutes. Seventy-one women experienced no discomfort during treatment. Thirty-one patients needed mild analgesics for an average of three days. Bleeding continued for a mean of 7.7 days after treatment and 73% experienced the bleeding as less, 8% as more as compared to menstrual bleeding. Ninety-two percent of the women would prefer this procedure if they had to undergo conization once again. In conclusion, we found a high acceptability in women treated with CO2 laser excisional conization under local anaesthesia in an outpatient setting.
PubMed ID
1471278 View in PubMed
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Acute hip fracture surgery anaesthetic technique and 30-day mortality in Sweden 2016 and 2017: A retrospective register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302999
Source
F1000Res. 2018; 7:1009
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Caroline Gremillet
Jan G Jakobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia & Intensive Care, Institution for Clinical Sciences, Danderyds University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 18288, Sweden.
Source
F1000Res. 2018; 7:1009
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anesthesia, General
Anesthetics - administration & dosage
Comorbidity
Female
Hip Fractures - mortality - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Background: Hip fractures affect 1.6 million patients yearly worldwide, often elderly with complex comorbidity. Mortality following surgery for acute hip fracture is high and multifactorial; high age, comorbidities and complication/deterioration in health following surgery. Whether the anaesthesia technique affects the 30-day mortality rate has been studied widely without reaching a consensus. The primary aim of this study was to determine anaesthetic techniques used in Sweden and their impact on the 30-day mortality rate in elderly undergoing acute hip fracture surgery. Other aims were to study the impact of age, gender, ASA class, fracture type and delay in surgery on the 30-day mortality rate. Methods: Data from 13,649 patients =50 years old who had undergone acute hip fracture surgery and been reported to Swedish perioperative register (SPOR) between 2016 and 2017 were analysed.     Results: The most commonly used anaesthetic technique was neuraxial anaesthesia (NA; 11,257, 82%), followed by general anaesthesia (GA; 2,190, 16%) and combined general and neuraxial anaesthesia (CA; 202, 1.5%) out of the 13,649 studied. The 30-day mortality rate was 7.7% for the entire cohort; GA 7.8%, NA 7.7% and CA 7.4%. Mortality was higher in elderly patients, those with a high ASA class, pertrochanteric fracture and males.     Conclusions: The present study showed that NA is by far the most common anaesthetic technique for acute hip fracture surgery in Sweden. However, the anaesthetic technique used during this type of surgery had no impact on the 30-day mortality rate in patients. Increasing age, ASA class and male gender increased the 30-day mortality.
PubMed ID
30210789 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute pain and use of local anesthesia: tooth drilling and childbirth labor pain beliefs among Anglo-Americans, Chinese, and Scandinavians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52621
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Moore
I. Brødsgaard
T K Mao
M L Miller
S F Dworkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle 98195-6370, USA. roding@u.washington.edu
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia, Local - utilization
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Dental Cavity Preparation
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pain - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Taiwan
United States
Abstract
Differences in ethnic beliefs about the perceived need for local anesthesia for tooth drilling and childbirth labor were surveyed among Anglo-Americans, Mandarin Chinese, and Scandinavians (89 dentists and 251 patients) matched for age, gender, and occupation. Subjects matched survey questionnaire items selected from previously reported interview results to estimate (a) their beliefs about the possible use of anesthetic for tooth drilling and labor pain compared with other possible remedies and (b) the choice of pain descriptors associated with the use of nonuse of anesthetic, including descriptions of injection pain. Multidimensional scaling, Gamma, and Chi-square statistics as well as odds ratios and Spearman's correlations were employed in the analysis. Seventy-seven percent of American informants reported the use of anesthetics as possible remedies for drilling and 51% reported the use of anesthetics for labor pain compared with 34% that reported the use of anesthetics among Chinese for drilling and 5% for labor pain and 70% among Scandinavians for drilling and 35% for labor pain. Most Americans and Swedes described tooth-drilling sensations as sharp, most Chinese used descriptors such as sharp and "sourish" (suan), and most Danes used words like shooting (jagende). By rank, Americans described labor pain as cramping, sharp, and excruciating, Chinese used words like sharp, intermittent, and horrible, Danes used words like shooting, tiring, and sharp, and Swedes used words like tiring, "good," yet horrible. Preferred pain descriptors for drilling, birth, and injection pains varied significantly by ethnicity. Results corroborated conclusions of a qualitative study about pain beliefs in relation to perceived needs for anesthetic in tooth drilling. Samples used to obtain the results were estimated to approach qualitative representativity for these urban ethnic groups.
PubMed ID
9790007 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acute poisoning in adults. 2013 consecutive cases in a large Danish anesthesiological department]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68692
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1984 Apr 2;146(14):1069-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2-1984

809 records – page 1 of 81.