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Allergy to carmine red (E120) is not dependent on concurrent mite allergy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150985
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2009;150(2):179-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jussi Liippo
Kaija Lammintausta
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. jussi.liippo@utu.fi
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2009;150(2):179-83
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Anaphylaxis - epidemiology
Angioedema - epidemiology - immunology
Animals
Carmine - adverse effects
Dermatophagoides farinae - immunology
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus - immunology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Additives - adverse effects
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Penaeidae - immunology
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Questionnaires
Skin Tests
Urticaria - epidemiology - immunology
Abstract
Positive skin prick test (SPT) reactions to carmine red (E120) have been reported to occur concurrently with reactions to mites. The relationships between positive SPT reactions to carmine, carmine allergy and concurrent mite reactions are unknown. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of carmine sensitization and its clinical importance among patients with suspected allergy to food additives.
The occurrence of positive SPT reactions to mites was studied in 6,464 patients: 3,164 were tested with carmine and 2,837 with shrimp. Carmine ingestion-associated symptoms were registered at the time of testing. Patients with positive SPT to carmine received a follow-up questionnaire on their symptoms 1-5 years later.
Positive SPT reactions to carmine were seen in 94 patients (3.0%) of whom 74% also had positive SPT reactions to mites and 22% to shrimp. Carmine ingestion-associated symptoms were not dependent on concurrent mite reactivity in 39/94 (42%) patients.
Carmine sensitization without sensitization to mites is seen in one fourth of the patients. Allergic reactions to carmine are not dependent on concurrent reactivity to mites.
PubMed ID
19439984 View in PubMed
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Anaphylaxis: assessment of a disease-based military medical standard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131737
Source
Mil Med. 2011 Aug;176(8):889-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Peter R Zeindler
Alan Gervais
Author Affiliation
Canadian Forces Environmental Medicine Establishment, 1133 Sheppard Avenue West, Toronto, Ontario M3K 2B3.
Source
Mil Med. 2011 Aug;176(8):889-95
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaphylaxis - epidemiology
Canada
Humans
Military Medicine - standards
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Models, Statistical
Personnel Selection - standards
Physical Fitness
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Abstract
Although widespread, the use of disease-based employment medical standards is poorly understood or researched. A probabilistic model and threshold value are developed and applied to a military (Canadian Forces [CF]) medical standard for anaphylaxis. Frequency estimates of prevalence, occurrence, and impairing reactions are determined from the literature for military applicants and from medical chart review of military members identified by prescriptions for self-administered epinephrine. The prevalence of prescriptions is 1.13% (CI 1.05, 1.22) and 0.86% (CI 0.72, 1.00) in the CF Regular Force and applicant populations, respectively. The proposed model predicts the annual risk of an impairing allergic reaction in the CF population ranges from 0.1% to 0.16%/year, well below the proposed threshold of 0.5%. The majority of this risk arises from new cases and not recurrences. Requirement for care increases with recurrence. This model allows a useful method of disease-based medical standard review.
PubMed ID
21882778 View in PubMed
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Eliciting allergens and treatment of anaphylaxis: Report of the finnish national anaphylaxis registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310567
Source
Allergy. 2019 10; 74(10):2010-2013
Publication Type
Letter
Date
10-2019
Author
Sanna M Edelman
Anna Kaarina Kukkonen
Mika J Mäkelä
Author Affiliation
Allergen Laboratory, Skin and Allergy Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Allergy. 2019 10; 74(10):2010-2013
Date
10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Letter
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Anaphylaxis - epidemiology - immunology - therapy
Animals
Disease Management
Disease Susceptibility
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Immunotherapy
Public Health Surveillance
Registries
Surveys and Questionnaires
PubMed ID
31070796 View in PubMed
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Hospitalization rates and prognosis of patients with anaphylactic shock in Denmark from 1995 through 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275563
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016 Apr;137(4):1143-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Anni Nørgaard Jeppesen
Christian Fynbo Christiansen
Trine Frøslev
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016 Apr;137(4):1143-7
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anaphylaxis - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Anaphylactic shock (AS) is an acute, potentially life-threatening hypersensitivity reaction. There are limited population-based data on changes in the hospitalization rate and prognosis of AS.
We sought to examine the proportion of patients with AS admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), the prognosis of AS, and time trends in AS hospitalization rates in Denmark from 1995 through 2012.
We performed a population-based cohort study in Denmark from 1995 through 2012 (cumulative population, 7.1 million) using the Danish National Patient Registry and the Danish Civil Registration System. Outcomes included time trends in first-time AS hospitalization rates, percentage admitted to an ICU, and 30-day mortality overall and stratified by year.
We included 6,707 patients with a first-time hospitalization for AS during 103,747,997 person-years of observation time. The average AS hospitalization rate was 64.6 (95% CI, 63.1-66.2) per 1,000,000 person-years. From 1995 to 2012, the annual AS hospitalization rate increased more than 2-fold (rate ratio, 2.6; 95% CI, 2.2-3.0). However, the annual hospitalization rate in children increased 10-fold (rate ratio, 10.75; 95% CI, 5.59-20.67). Only 0.7% of patients died within 30 days after admission (50 deaths), and most fatal AS cases occurred among patients aged 30 years or older. During the 2005-2012 period, 14.5% of patients hospitalized with AS were admitted to an ICU.
The AS hospitalization rate increased from 1995 to 2012; however, the 30-day mortality was less than 1%.
PubMed ID
26691436 View in PubMed
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IgE-sensitization to the cough suppressant pholcodine and the effects of its withdrawal from the Norwegian market.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137853
Source
Allergy. 2011 Jul;66(7):955-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
E. Florvaag
S G O Johansson
Å. Irgens
G H de Pater
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Allergy. 2011 Jul;66(7):955-60
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaphylaxis - epidemiology - etiology
Antitussive Agents - adverse effects - immunology
Codeine - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - immunology
Drug Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Morpholines - adverse effects - immunology
Neuromuscular Blocking Agents - adverse effects - immunology
Norway - epidemiology
Safety-Based Drug Withdrawals
Abstract
IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA), frequent in Norway, was proposed to be caused by exposure to pholcodine (PHO) carrying the allergenic quarternary ammonium ion epitope. Consequently, the PHO-containing drug was withdrawn from the market in March 2007.
Describe the effects of withdrawal of PHO on IgE, IgE-antibodies and reported frequencies of anaphylaxis to NMBAs.
Three hundred sera from supposedly allergic patients sampled yearly through 2006 to 2010 were analysed for IgE antibodies to PHO, suxamethonium (SUX) and morphine (MOR). Furthermore, IgE and preliminary reports from the Norwegian Network for Anaphylaxis under Anaesthesia (NARA) were monitored.
PHO exposure was associated with IgE sensitization to PHO, MOR and SUX. However, after withdrawal, within 1 year, antibody prevalences to PHO and SUX fell significantly from 11.0% to 5.0% and from 3.7% to 0.7%, respectively. At 3 years, SUX had fallen to 0.3%, PHO to 2.7% and MOR to 1.3%. By 2 years, the prevalence of elevated IgE was significantly reduced. After 3 years, the incidence of reported suspected anaesthetic anaphylaxis fell significantly, both the total number, the reactions related to NMBAs and those with IgE antibodies to SUX.
Withdrawing of PHO lowered significantly within 1-2 years levels of IgE and IgE antibodies to PHO, MOR and SUX, and, within 3 years, the frequency of NMBA suspected anaphylaxis. The results strengthen the PHO hypothesis considerably and equally the need to question the existence of cough depressants containing PHO.
PubMed ID
21241314 View in PubMed
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Latex sensitization: occupational versus general population prevalence rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203333
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Feb;35(2):196-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
G M Liss
G L Sussman
Author Affiliation
Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada. gary.liss@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Feb;35(2):196-200
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaphylaxis - epidemiology
Antibodies - blood
Asthma - epidemiology
Child
Conjunctivitis - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Latex - immunology
Latex Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Skin Tests
Students, Dental - statistics & numerical data
Urticaria - epidemiology
Abstract
Natural rubber latex (NRL) has become an important occupational health concern in recent years, particularly among health care workers. It has been suggested in some reports that the prevalence of latex sensitization among occupationally exposed groups is not different from that in the general population.
The findings of prevalence studies conducted among occupationally-exposed and general population groups were reviewed to determine whether there is evidence to support this suggestion.
Numerous surveys of HCWs have demonstrated that the prevalence of sensitization to latex ranged in most studies from 5 to 12%; sensitization of HCWs may produce clinical effects including urticaria, rhinoconjunctivitis, occupational asthma, and potentially life-threatening anaphylactic shock. More than a decade ago, data from Finland indicated that the prevalence of latex allergy in the general population was less than 1%. Recent reports from Finland have confirmed this, with observations that 0.7-1.1% of large series of patients were NRL-allergic, while among 804 unselected patients, the prevalence of latex skin prick test (SPT) positivity was 0.12%. In contrast, other studies have suggested that from 4 to 6.4% of individuals tested were positive for serum latex-specific IgE antibodies. However, the specificity of these assays has been reported to be low. In three recent studies based on SPTs, published in 1997, the prevalence of positive reactions to latex was about 1% or less. The prevalence was 0.7% (95% CI 0.3-1.4) among 758 apprentices in Quebec, Canada; and 1.1% among more than 3,000 children tested in Finland (1.0% confirmed on latex use test). There were no first- and second-year dental students with positive latex SPTs in Ontario, Canada.
These recent investigations provide further evidence consistent with earlier studies based on skin testing that the prevalence of latex sensitization in occupationally-unexposed groups is quite low (
PubMed ID
9894544 View in PubMed
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[Nut allergy - a difficult problem for the clinician].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108753
Source
Duodecim. 2013;129(12):1263-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anna Kaarina Kukkonen
Mika Mäkelä
Anna Pelkonen
Source
Duodecim. 2013;129(12):1263-70
Date
2013
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaphylaxis - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Counseling
Desensitization, Immunologic
Diagnosis, Differential
Finland - epidemiology
First Aid
Humans
Nut Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Skin Tests
Abstract
Nuts belong to the most significant causes of food anaphylaxis in Finland. Diagnosis of nut allergy is complicated by the fact that for those having birch allergy, skin prick tests and serum tests yield a positive reaction for peanut and hazelnut without the nut causing the allergy reactions. For fear of anaphylaxis, avoidance of nuts on the basis of conventional tests measuring allergic sensitization leads to an unnecessary therapeutic diet. Attempts must be made to recognize patients for whom the ingestion of even minute doses of nuts may be life-threatening. For patients having severe symptoms, guidance counseling and first-aid medication are offered as a precaution for accidental exposure.
PubMed ID
23847912 View in PubMed
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A randomized controlled trial comparing the frequency of acute reactions to plasma-removed platelets and prestorage WBC-reduced platelets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189599
Source
Transfusion. 2002 May;42(5):556-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Nancy M Heddle
Morris A Blajchman
Ralph M Meyer
Jeff H Lipton
Irwin R Walker
Graham D Sher
Lorrie A Constantini
Bruce Patterson
Robin S Roberts
Kevin E Thorpe
Mark N Levine
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. heddlen@mcmaster.ca
Source
Transfusion. 2002 May;42(5):556-66
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anaphylaxis - epidemiology - etiology
Blood Preservation
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Erythema - epidemiology - etiology
Fever - epidemiology - etiology
Filtration
Flushing - epidemiology - etiology
Hematologic Neoplasms - therapy
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Inflammation - epidemiology - etiology
Leukocytes
Middle Aged
Muscle Rigidity - epidemiology - etiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Plasma
Platelet Transfusion - adverse effects - methods
Plateletpheresis
Pruritus - epidemiology - etiology
Sepsis - epidemiology - etiology
Solutions
Abstract
Removal of the plasma supernatant from platelets before transfusion is effective in preventing acute reactions to platelets caused by cytokines. Prestorage WBC reduction of platelets may be even more effective at preventing reactions as the WBCs are removed and WBC-derived cytokines do not accumulate in this component. This study evaluates the effectiveness of plasma removal and two methods of prestorage WBC reduction for preventing acute reactions to platelets.
Platelets given to adults with hematologic malignancies were randomly allocated to one of three types: plasma supernatant removed and a platelet storage solution added, whole blood-derived platelets that are prestorage WBC reduced by filtration before storage, and prestorage WBC-reduced apheresis platelets. Patients were monitored before, during, and after transfusion, and the severity of reactions was graded on a Likert scale.
A total of 129 patients from four centers were given 1190 platelet transfusions. The overall frequency of reactions was 13.6 percent (162 of 1190), 21.3 percent (36 of 169) for the plasma-removed platelets, 11.4 percent (59 of 517) for random donor WBC-reduced platelets, and 13.3 percent (67 of 504) for apheresis WBC-reduced platelets (p=0.384). The overall frequency of severe reactions was 4.1 percent with plasma-removed platelets, 1.7 percent for whole blood-derived, prestorage WBC-reduced platelets, and 1.4 percent for prestorage WBC-reduced apheresis platelets.
The frequency of reactions to plasma-removed platelets and prestorage WBC-reduced platelets was not significantly different; however, the power of the study for this comparison was low. There was no difference in the frequency of reactions to the two types of prestorage WBC-reduced platelets. The frequency of severe reactions to prestorage WBC-reduced platelets is low, occurring in only 1 to 2 percent of transfusions.
Notes
Comment In: Transfusion. 2003 Feb;43(2):291-2; author reply 29212559029
PubMed ID
12084163 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.