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3480 records – page 1 of 348.

2-year clinical performance of a fluoride-containing fissure sealant in young schoolchildren at caries risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34233
Source
Am J Dent. 1997 Jun;10(3):115-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
A. Carlsson
M. Petersson
S. Twetman
Author Affiliation
Public Dental Clinic, Vallås, Sweden.
Source
Am J Dent. 1997 Jun;10(3):115-9
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Cariostatic Agents - analysis - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Colony Count, Microbial
Composite Resins - chemistry - therapeutic use
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque - microbiology
Fluorides - analysis - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Humans
Lactobacillus - drug effects - isolation & purification
Pit and Fissure Sealants - therapeutic use
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Saliva - chemistry - microbiology
Statistics, nonparametric
Streptococcus mutans - drug effects - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the clinical performance of Helioseal-F, a fluoride-containing fissure sealant, in school children at caries risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A caries risk assessment based on past caries experience, saliva microbial tests, buffer capacity and frequency of sugar intake was carried out in 204 healthy children, 6-7 years of age. Children exhibiting one or more risk factors were considered at caries risk (n = 121) and their permanent molars were sealed with a fluoride-containing fissure sealant, thus forming a fissure sealant group (FSG). The remaining 83 children with low caries risk received no fissure sealants and constituted a reference group (RG). Both groups were followed for 2 years. From 15 children of both groups, unstimulated whole saliva was collected 1 month after sealant placement in order to determine fluoride levels. In another 20 children, a split-mouth study design was utilized to compare the colonization of mutans streptococci adjacent to and on F-containing sealants and conventional controls. The sealants were placed by dental hygienists according to the manufacturers' instructions. RESULTS: A total of 431 fissure sealants were placed at baseline. Complete retention was found in 76.6% during the study period while 22.0% were partially lost. Six sealants (1.4%) were completely lost. The enamel caries incidence was 45% lower (P
PubMed ID
9545884 View in PubMed
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A 2-year self-help smoking cessation manual intervention among middle-aged Finnish men: an application of the transtheoretical model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217852
Source
Prev Med. 1994 Jul;23(4):507-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
U E Pallonen
L. Leskinen
J O Prochaska
C J Willey
R. Kääriäinen
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Prevention Research Center, University of Rhode Island, Kingston 02881.
Source
Prev Med. 1994 Jul;23(4):507-14
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manuals as Topic
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Self Care
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
A 2-year self-help manual smoking cessation intervention was conducted among a panel of middle-aged Finnish men (n = 265) who were recruited proactively in a longitudinal cardiovascular risk factor surveillance study.
Intervention utilized the stages of change concept of the transtheoretical model. The stages were assessed in the treatment condition at baseline of the cessation study and after that by mail every sixth month. Assessments were followed by an immediate mailing of a stage-based self-help manual matching the stage of change at that time. A usual care group was assessed annually but received no treatment.
A significant time x intervention effect (P
PubMed ID
7971879 View in PubMed
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A 4-year review of pediatric mental health emergencies in Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148300
Source
CJEM. 2009 Sep;11(5):447-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Amanda S Newton
Samina Ali
David W Johnson
Christina Haines
Rhonda J Rosychuk
Rachel A Keaschuk
Philip Jacobs
Terry P Klassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta. mandi.newton@ualberta.ca
Source
CJEM. 2009 Sep;11(5):447-54
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alberta - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Humans
Infant
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
We sought to determine and compare rates of pediatric mental health presentations and associated costs in emergency departments (EDs) in Alberta.
We examined 16 154 presentations by 12 589 patients (patient age
PubMed ID
19788789 View in PubMed
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5HTR2A gene polymorphism and personality traits in patients with major psychoses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190821
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2002 Mar;17(1):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
V E Golimbet
M V Alfimova
K K Manandyan
N G Mitushina
L I Abramova
V G Kaleda
I V Oleichik
YuB Yurov
V I Trubnikov
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Preventive Genetics, Research Mental Health Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Zagorodnoe sh. 2/2, Moscow, Russia 113152. golimbet@mail.ru
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2002 Mar;17(1):24-8
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Female
Humans
Male
Moscow
Personality - genetics
Personality Inventory
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - genetics
Receptors, Serotonin - genetics
Abstract
Serotonin receptor (5HTR2A) gene polymorphism has been reported to be associated with clinical phenotypes in schizophrenia. The current study attempted to investigate a relationship between 5HTR2A 102T/C polymorphism and personality traits as well as clinical symptoms in patients with ICD-10 diagnoses of schizophrenia and affective disorders. 5HTR2A genotyping, clinical and psychological assessment were administered to 375 patients, 104 first-degree healthy relatives of the patients and 157 controls. In the patients an association was observed between the 2/2 5HTR2A genotype and scores on the Hypochondriasis scale (MMPI) (ANOVA, F = 4.56; P = 0.011) and trait anxiety (F = 4.21; P = 0.002). A significant difference between 1/1 and 2/2 genotypes has been also found for Neuroticism scores (EPI) (t = 2.18; P = 0.0031). No significant differences by 5HTR2A genotype were observed in either the control or first-degree relatives group for all scales studied. Positive, negative and psychopathological symptoms emerged higher in the 2/2 genotype patients compared to other genotype carriers. Therefore, the 2/2 genotype may contribute to produce the phenotype, with specific clinical and pathological features in common, regardless of nosologic heterogeneity of psychoses.
PubMed ID
11918989 View in PubMed
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6-bit and 8-bit digital radiography for detecting simulated periodontal lesions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51165
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1994 Apr;77(4):406-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
B. Pass
A J Furkart
S B Dove
W D McDavid
P H Gregson
Author Affiliation
Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1994 Apr;77(4):406-11
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Comparative Study
Contrast Sensitivity
Dental Caries - radiography
Humans
Mandible - radiography
Periodontal Diseases - radiography
ROC Curve
Radiographic Image Enhancement - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of a digital radiography system that uses 6- and 8-bit displays with conventional D-speed film for the detection of simulated periodontal bone lesions. Eleven human hemimandibles were used as specimens. Simulated lesions were created at the buccal cortical plate in the marginal bone area with the use of a round bur 1.4 mm in diameter. Lesions were created in a defined sequence to preclude visual cues as to the depth of the lesions. Lesion size progressed in 0.5 mm increments. At each stage the mandibles were imaged with a Sens-A-Ray system (REGAM Medical Systems AB, Sundsvall, Sweden) and D-speed film. Exposure parameters for each specimen/receptor combination were standardized by either the mean optical density or mean gray value at the approximal crestal bone area. Film images and digital images displayed with 64 and 256 gray levels were presented to six observers for evaluation. Observers were ask to rate their confidence as to the presence or absence of a lesion using a 5-point confidence scale. A total of 96 lesion sites and 96 control sites were presented to the observers. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated for each system. The area under the curve was used as the index of diagnostic accuracy. The mean receiver operating characteristic areas for 6-bit and 8-bit displays and D-speed film were 0.746 +/- 0.043, 0.717 +/- 0.056 and 0.742 +/- 0.059, respectively. Analysis of variance was used to compare the means. No statistical difference was found between any of the three image displays (p > 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8015807 View in PubMed
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A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
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10-year survival and quality of life in patients with high-risk pN0 prostate cancer following definitive radiotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94068
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2007
Author
Berg Arne
Lilleby Wolfgang
Bruland Oyvind Sverre
Fosså Sophie Dorothea
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. arne.berg@radiumhospitalet.no
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Date
Nov-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Disease Progression
Erectile Dysfunction - physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Quality of Life
Radiotherapy, Conformal
Survival Analysis
Urination Disorders - physiopathology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate long-term overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), clinical progression-free survival (cPFS), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following definitive radiotherapy (RT) given to T(1-4p)N(0)M(0) prostate cancer patients provided by a single institution between 1989 and 1996. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We assessed outcome among 203 patients who had completed three-dimensional conformal RT (66 Gy) without hormone treatment and in whom staging by lymphadenectomy had been performed. OS was compared with an age-matched control group from the general population. A cross-sectional, self-report survey of HRQoL was performed among surviving patients. RESULTS: Median observation time was 10 years (range, 1-16 years). Eighty-one percent had high-risk tumors defined as T(3-4) or Gleason score (GS) > or =7B (4+3). Among these, 10-year OS, CSS, and cPFS rates were 52%, 66%, and 39%, respectively. The corresponding fractions in low-risk patients (T(1-2) and GS or =7B.
PubMed ID
17703896 View in PubMed
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A 15-month evaluation of the effects of repeated subgingival minocycline in chronic adult periodontitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201582
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
D. van Steenberghe
B. Rosling
P O Söder
R G Landry
U. van der Velden
M F Timmerman
E F McCarthy
G. Vandenhoven
C. Wouters
M. Wilson
J. Matthews
H N Newman
Author Affiliation
Catholic University, Leuven, Belgium.
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans - drug effects
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Campylobacter - drug effects
Canada
Chronic Disease
Colony Count, Microbial
Dental Plaque Index
Dental Scaling
Double-Blind Method
Eikenella corrodens - drug effects
Europe
Female
Fusobacterium nucleatum - drug effects
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Minocycline - administration & dosage
Ointments
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - drug therapy - microbiology
Periodontitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Porphyromonas gingivalis - drug effects
Prevotella intermedia - drug effects
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Treponema - drug effects
Abstract
A double-blind, randomized, parallel, comparative study was designed to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of subgingivally administered minocycline ointment versus a vehicle control.
One hundred four patients (104) with moderate to severe adult periodontitis (34 to 64 years of age; mean 46 years) were enrolled in the study. Following scaling and root planing, patients were randomized to receive either 2% minocycline ointment or a matched vehicle control. Study medication was administered directly into the periodontal pocket with a specially designed, graduated, disposable applicator at baseline; week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12. Scaling and root planing was repeated at months 6 and 12. Standard clinical variables (including probing depth and attachment level) were evaluated at baseline and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15. Microbiological sampling using DNA probes was done at baseline; at week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15.
Both treatment groups showed significant and clinically relevant reductions in the numbers of each of the 7 microorganisms measured during the entire 15-month study period. When differences were detected, sites treated with minocycline ointment always produced statistically significantly greater reductions than sites which received the vehicle control. For initial pockets > or =5 mm, a mean reduction in probing depth of 1.9 mm was seen in the test sites, versus 1.2 mm in the control sites. Sites with a baseline probing depth > or =7 mm and bleeding index >2 showed an average of 2.5 mm reduction with minocycline versus 1.5 mm with the vehicle. Gains in attachment (0.9 mm and 1.1 mm) were observed in minocycline-treated sites, with baseline probing depth > or =5 mm and > or =7 mm, respectively, compared with 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm gain at control sites. Subgingival administration of minocycline ointment was well tolerated.
Overall, the results demonstrate that repeated subgingival administration of minocycline ointment in the treatment of adult periodontitis is safe and leads to significant adjunctive improvement after subgingival instrumentation in both clinical and microbiologic variables over a 15-month period.
PubMed ID
10397521 View in PubMed
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A 24-month clinical study of the incidence and progression of dental caries in relation to consumption of chewing gum containing xylitol in school preventive programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228109
Source
J Dent Res. 1990 Nov;69(11):1771-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990
Author
D. Kandelman
G. Gagnon
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Health, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Montreal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 1990 Nov;69(11):1771-5
Date
Nov-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Chewing Gum
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
School Dentistry
Socioeconomic Factors
Xylitol
Abstract
The effect of chewing gum containing xylitol on the incidence and progression of dental caries was tested in a sample of 274 children, aged eight and nine years, of low socio-economic status and high caries rate. They were divided into two experimental groups (15% and 65% xylitol chewing gum distributed three times a day at school) and one control group (without chewing gum). The three groups were exposed to the same basic preventive program. Children who chewed gum had a significantly lower net progression of decay (progressions-reversals) over a 24-month period than did the controls. Results for the two groups chewing gum were similar. Chewing xylitol gum had a beneficial effect on the caries process for all types of tooth surfaces, and especially for bucco-lingual surfaces. The two experimental groups had a DMF(S) increment of 2.24 surfaces, compared with 6.06 surfaces for the control group. For this indicator, there was no difference between the two experimental groups. Results for the plaque index were in agreement with those of the DMF(S) increment and the net progression of decay.
PubMed ID
2229617 View in PubMed
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A 24-year follow-up of root filled teeth and periapical health amongst middle aged and elderly women in Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70741
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Apr;38(4):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
F. Frisk
M. Hakeberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Endodontology/Oral Diagnosis, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. fredrik.frisk@lio.se
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Apr;38(4):246-54
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Periapical Periodontitis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Radiography, Panoramic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Tooth, Nonvital - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM: To describe the endodontic status amongst middle-aged and elderly women longitudinally and cross-sectionally over 24 years. METHODOLOGY: A random sample of 1462 women 38, 46, 50, 54 and 60 years old, living in Göteborg, Sweden, were sampled in 1968 for medical and dental examinations with a participation rate of 90.1%. The same women were re-examined in 1980 and 1992 together with new 38- and 50-year-old women. The dental examination consisted of questionnaires, clinical and panoramic radiological survey (OPG). The number of teeth, number of root filled teeth (RF) and number of teeth with periapical radiolucencies (PA) were registered. The RF and PA ratios were calculated. Cross-sectional data were analysed by means of anova and longitudinal data by a general linear model for repeated measures. Sample prevalences were compared and statistical inferences were made with the chi-squared test. In all analysis, the confidence interval (CI) regarded mean difference between groups (95% CI). RESULTS: The RF and PA ratio decreased over time as well as the frequency of edentulous subjects. Cross-sectional analysis revealed a minor increase in frequency of RF and PA and loss of teeth with age. Longitudinally, loss of teeth was evident in all cohorts. In addition, there was a trend of lower number of teeth with PA, and the RF ratio increased with age. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of periapical disease did not increase with age, probably as a result of root canal treatment and extractions. Data showed that the prevalence of RF teeth and teeth with PA decreased for comparable age cohorts during the 24-year follow-up.
PubMed ID
15810975 View in PubMed
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3480 records – page 1 of 348.