Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Circulation. 1996 Apr 1;93(7):1321-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1996
Author
H. Feigenbaum
Source
Circulation. 1996 Apr 1;93(7):1321-7
Date
Apr-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analog-Digital Conversion
Animals
Autobiography
Echocardiography - history - instrumentation - methods
Echocardiography, Doppler - history - instrumentation
Equipment Design
Heart Diseases - ultrasonography
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Japan
Pericardial Effusion - ultrasonography
Sweden
United States
Abstract
The evolution of echocardiography has been interesting and dramatic. The technology has grown and has become an integral part of the practice of cardiology. As with all technology, there are advantages and disadvantages. The principal disadvantage is the fact that education and training are imperative to provide high-quality examinations and proper interpretations. In addition, many of the diagnoses are still qualitative and subjective. The principal advantage is the amazing versatility of this technology. The wealth of information that can be provided both noninvasively with a transthoracic examination and invasively with either transesophageal or intravascular ultrasound is tremendous. The anatomic and physiological data provided frequently give definitive diagnoses. If performed properly and for the right reason, this test should be very cost effective and should be a major asset in the coming era of medical cost containment. There are many technological advances that should enhance this information. With technology such as digital recordings, it is hoped that the clinicians will have better access to these data and will be more comfortable in interacting with this important diagnostic tool.
PubMed ID
8641018 View in PubMed
Less detail

Teleconsultation of patients with otorhinolaryngologic conditions. A telendoscopic pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35897
Source
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1994 Feb;120(2):133-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
S. Pedersen
G. Hartviksen
D. Haga
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1994 Feb;120(2):133-6
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analog-Digital Conversion
Child
Child, Preschool
Education, Medical, Continuing
Educational Measurement
Endoscopy
Family Practice - education
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Otolaryngology - education
Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases - diagnosis
Referral and Consultation
Telecommunications
Video Recording
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We have integrated endoscopic equipment with a network of video conference studios to develop a remote consultation service for diagnoses of patients with otorhinolaryngologic conditions. DESIGN: The study was performed as a diagnostic test in three phases. During the first phase, a general practitioner was instructed in otorhinolaryngologic examination techniques. In the second phase, remote endoscopic examinations were simulated and the diagnostic results were compared with results from a standard examination. In the third phase, the general practitioner made real telendoscopic examinations. SETTING: Signals from a video camera attached to the endoscope are transmitted from the primary care center to the otorhinolaryngologist who is 180 km away via a 2-million-bits-per-second circuit. The specialist observes the endoscopic examination on a monitor and influences the control and movement of the endoscope by communicating over a two-way sound-and-picture connection with the general practitioner. PATIENTS: A convenience sample of 24 patients was examined in the last two phases. RESULTS: Although the video image is compressed before transmission over the telecommunications network, our results show that the quality of the transmitted images was equivalent to the quality of the images from a standard endoscopic examination. CONCLUSIONS: Our study has shown that this method of consultation may be used in the clinic with the same degree of reproducibility as in a conventional consultation situation. This enables us to give patients in remote locations better service at a lower cost.
PubMed ID
8297568 View in PubMed
Less detail