Skip header and navigation

Refine By

78 records – page 1 of 8.

[A classification system of anogenital findings. A diagnostic tool in the assessment of sexually abused children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34023
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Jan 10;118(1):67-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1998
Author
A K Myhre
K. Berntzen
E. Selvaag
E K Normann
B. Ruud
G. Borgen
Author Affiliation
Det medisinske fakultet, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Jan 10;118(1):67-70
Date
Jan-10-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anal Canal - injuries
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - classification - diagnosis
English Abstract
Female
Forensic Medicine - standards
Forensic Psychiatry - standards
Humans
Male
Norway
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Urogenital Diseases - classification - diagnosis - etiology
Abstract
The assessment of suspected sexual child abuse demands teamwork where the paediatrician plays a central role. From a juridical point of view, the task of the paediatrician is to evaluate the anatomic, microbiologic and forensic medical findings. In 1995, in order to improve the quality of this work, Norwegian paediatricians established a peer review group which meets on a regular basis. Based on available literature and the experience of the individual members, a classification system for anogenital findings has been developed. The findings are divided into five classes. Class one comprises findings frequently seen in children who have not been abused. Class two comprises findings not considered to be normal, but for which there could be many different causes. Classes three, four and five represent findings which are increasingly predictive with respect to injury penetration or attempted penetration. Since our knowledge of anogenital anatomy in children who have not been abused is limited, our classification system should be updated regularly.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 May 10;118(12):19109638062
PubMed ID
9481915 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse obstetric outcomes among female childhood and adolescent cancer survivors in Sweden: A population-based matched cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309347
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2019 12; 98(12):1603-1611
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2019
Author
Gabriela Armuand
Agneta Skoog Svanberg
Marie Bladh
Gunilla Sydsjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2019 12; 98(12):1603-1611
Date
12-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries
Cancer Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Clitoris - injuries
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Dystocia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Labor Presentation
Labor, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Lacerations - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Cancer treatment during childhood may lead to late adverse effects, such as reduced musculoskeletal development or vascular, endocrine and pulmonary dysfunction, which in turn may have an adverse effect on later pregnancy and childbirth. The aim of the present study was to investigate pregnancy and obstetric outcomes as well as the offspring's health among childhood and adolescent female cancer survivors.
This register-based study included all women born between 1973 and 1977 diagnosed with cancer in childhood or adolescence (age
PubMed ID
31329281 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anal and urinary incontinence in women with obstetric anal sphincter rupture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64429
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1996 Oct;103(10):1034-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
T. Tetzschner
M. Sørensen
G. Lose
J. Christiansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Glostrup County Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1996 Oct;103(10):1034-40
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries
Electromyography
Fecal Incontinence - etiology
Female
Humans
Manometry
Obstetric Labor Complications
Pelvis - innervation
Pregnancy
Puerperal Disorders - etiology
Reaction Time
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Rupture
Urinary Incontinence - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the long term impact of obstetric anal sphincter rupture on the frequency of anal and urinary incontinence and to identify factors to predict women at risk. DESIGN: An observational study. SETTINGS: Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and of Surgery D, Glostrup County University Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-four consecutive women who had sustained an obstetric anal sphincter rupture. INTERVENTIONS: Assessment of history, anal manometry, anal sphincter electromyography and pudendal nerve terminal motor latency at three months postpartum A questionnaire regarding anal and urinary incontinence was sent two to four years postpartum. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The frequency of anal and urinary incontinence and risk factors for the development of incontinence. RESULTS: Thirty of 72 women (42%) who responded had anal incontinence two to four years postpartum; 23 (32%) had urinary incontinence and 13 (18%) had both urinary and anal incontinence. Overall, 40 of 72 women (56%) had incontinence symptoms. The occurrence of anal incontinence was associated with pudendal nerve terminal motor latencies of more than 2.0 ms, and the occurrence of urinary incontinence was associated with the degree of rupture, the use of vacuum extraction and previous presence of urinary incontinence. Seventeen women had subsequently undergone a vaginal delivery in relation to which four (24%) had aggravation of anal incontinence, and three (18%) had aggravation of urinary incontinence. Of the women with incontinence, 38% wanted treatment but only a few had sought medical advice. CONCLUSIONS: Obstetric anal sphincter rupture is associated with a risk of approximately 50% for developing either anal or urinary incontinence or both. The prediction of women at risk is difficult. Information and routine follow up of all women with obstetric anal sphincter rupture is mandatory.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1997 Jun;104(6):753-49197889
Comment In: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1997 Jun;104(6):754-59197890
PubMed ID
8863705 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anal incontinence after obstetric sphincter tears: incidence in a Norwegian county.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63320
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Oct;83(10):989-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Stig Norderval
Deirdre Nsubuga
Christian Bjelke
Josef Frasunek
Idunn Myklebust
Barthold Vonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Digestive Surgery, University Hospital of Tromsö, Norway. stig.norderval@unn.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Oct;83(10):989-94
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries - surgery
Fecal Incontinence - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - surgery
Female
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Norway - epidemiology
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - surgery
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Anal sphincter tears during vaginal delivery are a major cause of anal incontinence. We wanted to assess the incidence in a Norwegian county where primary repairs are performed in four hospitals using similar per- and postoperative protocol for the treatment of such injuries. METHODS: A postal questionnaire was distributed to all women who underwent primary repair of obstetric sphincter tears in the years 1999 and 2000 in the county of Möre and Romsdal. Symptoms of incontinence and fecal urgency were recorded. Incontinence was assessed using the Pescatori score system. RESULTS: Clinically detected sphincter tears occurred in 180 of 5123 vaginal deliveries (3.5%). The questionnaire was returned by 156 women (87%). Six women were excluded. Median follow-up was 25 months (range 4-39). Incontinence was reported by 88 women (59%), restricted to flatus incontinence in 53 cases (35%). Fecal urgency without incontinence was reported by 14 women (9%). Sixty-three women (42%) reported de novo moderate to severe symptoms. There was no difference in outcome whether the sphincter injury was partial or complete. Mean Pescatori score was 3.7 in women who felt disabled compared with 2.9 in women who did not feel disabled by their incontinence (P
PubMed ID
15453900 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anal incontinence after vaginal delivery: a prospective study in primiparous women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64062
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1999 Apr;106(4):324-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
J P Zetterström
A. López
B. Anzén
A. Dolk
M. Norman
A. Mellgren
Author Affiliation
Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1999 Apr;106(4):324-30
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries
Analysis of Variance
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects - methods
Fecal Incontinence - etiology
Female
Flatulence - etiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence and degree of anal incontinence after vaginal delivery among primiparous women and to define associated risk factors. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Sweden, a university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred and forty-nine primiparous women. METHODS: Questionnaires distributed within the first days after delivery and re-distributed five and nine months postpartum. Analysis of delivery records. RESULTS: Eighty percent of the women answered all questionnaires. At five months postpartum, 2% of the women had symptoms of faecal incontinence and 25% had symptoms of involuntary flatus. At nine months postpartum, 1% of the women had symptoms of faecal incontinence and 26% had symptoms of involuntary flatus. The majority of the women had infrequent symptoms and a decrease in severity was noted at nine months. Symptoms of incontinence were more common in women who sustained a sphincter tear at delivery. Risk factors for incontinence at five months included maternal age, duration of the second stage of labour, instrumental vaginal delivery, and clinically diagnosed sphincter tear at delivery. Development of incontinence at nine months was associated with maternal age and clinically diagnosed sphincter tear at delivery. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that infrequent involuntary flatus is a common symptom after vaginal delivery in primiparous women. These symptoms of involuntary flatus frequently improved and only a few women suffered from frank faecal incontinence. Factors associated with an increased risk of anal incontinence and sphincter tears should be considered during delivery.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1999 Oct;106(10):110710519441
PubMed ID
10426238 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anal sphincter rupture during delivery: philosophy of science and clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115013
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Mar 19;133(6):652-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-19-2013
Author
Atle Fretheim
Author Affiliation
Global Health Unit, Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Norway. atle.fretheim@kunnskapssenteret.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Mar 19;133(6):652-4
Date
Mar-19-2013
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anal Canal - injuries
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects - methods
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Perineum
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Rupture - epidemiology - prevention & control
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 May 28;133(10):1047-823712148
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 May 28;133(10):104823712149
PubMed ID
23552161 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Anal sphincter rupture during vaginal delivery]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63247
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Mar 3;125(5):591-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-3-2005
Author
Annelill Valbø
Marit Kristoffersen
Author Affiliation
Kvinneklinikken, Asker og Baerum sykehus, 1309 Rud. annelill.valbo@sabhf.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Mar 3;125(5):591-3
Date
Mar-3-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anal Canal - injuries
Delivery, Obstetric
English Abstract
Fecal Incontinence - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Obstetric Labor Complications - diagnosis - prevention & control
Pregnancy
Rupture
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Rupture of the anal sphincter during childbirth is a major cause of faecal incontinence among women, a condition with considerable psychosocial consequences. The reported incidences show large variations, from 0.36% to 24%. Definitions and classifications vary as much. Also, reports on the persisting subjective problems of the women afflicted demonstrate diversity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Over a 2(1/2) year period from January 2000, all women with partial or total rupture of the anal sphincter during delivery were invited to a follow up consultation after 6 months and interviewed about their subjective discomfort. RESULTS: Over the period in question we registered 147 ruptures of the anal sphincter among 6124 vaginal deliveries (2.4%); 109 (1.7%) were partial ruptures, 38 (0.7%) total ruptures. Among the 137 women who came in for a consultation 6 months after delivery, 92 (67%) had no complaints at all. Five women (4%) had some degree of leakage for liquid stools. None of them had incontinence for solid stools. INTERPRETATION: The reported incidence is in keeping with most of the previous registrations in the Nordic countries, but not with those giving the lowest figures. Improved delivery technique might reduce the incidence. The incidence of discomfort and complaints we found at 6 months was lower than expected on the basis of previous reports.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Jun 2;125(11):153815940336
PubMed ID
15776034 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anal sphincter tears at spontaneous delivery: a comparison of five hospitals in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91449
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(11):1176-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Valbø Annelill
Gjessing Leif
Herzog Christine
Goderstad Jeanne Mette
Laine Katariina
Valset Anne Marte
Author Affiliation
Asker and Baerum Hospital, Oslo, Norway. annelill.valbo@sabhf.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(11):1176-80
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries
Analgesia, Epidural - methods
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects - methods
Episiotomy - methods
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Labor Presentation
Midwifery - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Obstetric Labor Complications
Oxytocin - administration & dosage
Perineum - injuries
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyze circumstances relating to severe anal sphincter tears occurring at spontaneous delivery, in view of reported differences in practice regarding manual perineal protection during delivery. DESIGN: Cohort study of midwife-conducted non-operative vaginal deliveries. SETTING: Five Norwegian hospitals with 12,438 consecutive deliveries during a 12-month period. METHODS: Data from 357 women sustaining third and fourth grade anal sphincter tears (2.9%) were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Different incidence of major perineal tears. RESULTS: Sphincter tear incidence varied significantly between the five hospitals, from 1.3 to 4.7% (p
PubMed ID
18972270 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anal sphincter tears: prospective study of obstetric risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63923
Source
BJOG. 2000 Jul;107(7):926-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
E. Samuelsson
L. Ladfors
U B Wennerholm
B. Gåreberg
K. Nyberg
H. Hagberg
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Ostra, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
BJOG. 2000 Jul;107(7):926-31
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries
Analysis of Variance
Birth weight
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Obstetric Labor Complications - prevention & control
Parity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Rupture
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate intrapartum risk factors for anal sphincter tear. DESIGN: A prospective observational study. SETTING: Delivery unit at the University Hospital in Göteborg, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 2883 consecutive women delivered vaginally during the period between 1995 and 1997. Information was obtained, from patient records and from especially designed protocols which were completed during and after childbirth. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anal sphincter (third and fourth degree) tear. RESULTS: Anal sphincter tear occurred in 95 of 2883 women (3.3%). Univariate analysis demonstrated that the risk of anal sphincter tear was increased by nulliparity, high infant weight, lack of manual perineal protection, deficient visualisation of perineum, severe perineal oedema, long duration of delivery and especially protracted second phase and bear down, use of oxytocin, episiotomy, vacuum extraction and epidural anaesthesia. After analysis with stepwise logistic regression, reported as odds ratio, 95% confidence interval, the following factors remained independently associated with anal sphincter tear: slight perineal oedema (0.40, 0.26-0.64); manual perineal protection (0.49, 0.28-0.86); short duration of bear down (0.47, 0.24-0.91); no visualisation of perineum (2.77, 1.36-5.63); parity (0.59, 0.40-0.89); and high infant weight (2.02, 1.30-3.16). Analysis of variance showed that manual perineal protection had a stronger influence on lowering the frequency, and lack of visualisation of perineum and infant weight had a stronger influence on raising the frequency, of anal sphincter tears in nulliparous compared with parous women. CONCLUSIONS: Perineal oedema, poor ocular surveillance of perineum, deficient perineal protection during delivery, protracted final phase of the second stage, parity and high infant weight all constitute independent risk factors for anal sphincter tear. Such information is essential in order to reduce perineal trauma during childbirth.
PubMed ID
10901566 View in PubMed
Less detail

78 records – page 1 of 8.