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Acute polyhydramnios in twin pregnancy. A retrospective study with special reference to therapeutic amniocentesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59890
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(4):297-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Rådestad
P A Thomassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(4):297-300
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Amniocentesis - adverse effects - methods - standards
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Polyhydramnios - epidemiology - therapy - ultrasonography
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, Multiple
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Tocolysis
Twins, Monozygotic
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Abstract
Acute polyhydramnios in monozygotic twin pregnancy causes severe maternal discomfort and carries a high risk of premature labor. During the years 1980 to 1987, 36 patients with this complication were delivered in Sweden, giving an incidence of 1/20,000 births, or 1/200 twin births. In 18 patients (group A) who were treated with one or more amniotic taps, the delivery was postponed by 2 weeks, as compared with one week in 18 conservatively treated patients (group B). The peri- and neonatal death rate was 47% in group A and 58% in group B. Our own experience is that amniotic taps are safe if the amniotic fluid is removed slowly under prophylactic tocolysis. It gives symptomatic relief to the mother and may postpone labor until the gestational age of the twins is more compatible with survival.
PubMed ID
2244460 View in PubMed
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Allo-immunization during pregnancy. Clinical results from 1983 to 1989 in a Scandinavian university hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57747
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1992 May;71(4):273-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
P. Belfrage
P. Thomassen
J. Floberg
O. Akerblom
U. Broberger
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1992 May;71(4):273-7
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amniocentesis
Blood Transfusion, Intrauterine
Erythroblastosis, Fetal - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Exchange Transfusion, Whole Blood
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Peptides - immunology
Pregnancy
Rh Isoimmunization - epidemiology - therapy
Rh-Hr Blood-Group System - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
From 1983 to 1989, 147,068 pregnancies were analyzed for allo-immunization against erythrocyte antigens. Approximately half of the cases were due to immunization against factor D and the others were due to allo-immunization against other antigens (K, c, E, etc.). In 61 cases exchange transfusion of the newborn was needed and in 115 cases diagnostic amniocentesis was done during pregnancy. Intrauterine transfusions were performed in 10 cases. Fetal and neonatal mortality was 4% in these moderate to severe cases, all due to immunization against D. Immunization against D was due to failure to give immunoglobulin anti-D in about 2/3 of the cases. Systematic prophylactic treatment with anti-D during pregnancy would probably not be cost-effective in this population.
PubMed ID
1322620 View in PubMed
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[Amniocentesis and chorionic villi biopsy. A 10-year material]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63771
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Aug 27;163(35):4750-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-27-2001
Author
K V Ejskjaer
A U Sørensen
P L Johannesen
J. Praest
Author Affiliation
Randers Centralsygehus, gynaekologisk obstetrisk afdeling. k.ejskjaer@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Aug 27;163(35):4750-3
Date
Aug-27-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - diagnosis - genetics - pathology
Adult
Amniocentesis - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Chorionic Villi Sampling - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - diagnosis - genetics - pathology
Humans
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - pathology
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prenatal diagnosis at a secondary referral hospital. METHOD: A retrospective study was carried out on 1752 women examined by amniocentesis (AC) (n = 1037) or chorion villus sampling (CVS) (n = 715) at Randers Centralsygehus from 1 April 1987 to 31 December 1996. RESULTS: A cytogenetic diagnosis was made in 99.8% of the AC group and 99.4% of the CVS group. Complications, recorded as either spontaneous abortion, bleeding/threatening abortion, pain/contractions or amniotic fluid leakage, were seen in 1.9%, 3.3%, 2.9%, and 2.3% after AC and 1.8%, 7.3%, 3.4%, and 0% after CVS. There were significantly more re-examinations after CVS when the procedure was carried out by less experienced operators (p
PubMed ID
11572051 View in PubMed
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Amniocentesis and women with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or human immunodeficiency virus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186740
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2003 Feb;25(2):145-48, 149-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Gregory Davies
R Douglas Wilson
Valérie Désilets
Gregory J Reid
Dorothy Shaw
Anne Summers
Philip Wyatt
David Young
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2003 Feb;25(2):145-48, 149-52
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amniocentesis - methods
Canada
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Hepatitis B - prevention & control - transmission
Hepatitis C - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
MEDLINE
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - virology
Prenatal Diagnosis - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
To review the risk of in utero infection through amniocentesis in women with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
Fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality.
Review articles, meta-analyses, and MEDLINE searches from 1966 to 2002 for English-language articles related to amniocentesis, fetal and neonatal infection, and hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or HIV.
The evidence collected was reviewed by the Genetics Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) and quantified using the Evaluation of Evidence guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Exam.
1. The risk of fetal hepatitis B infection through amniocentesis is low. However, knowledge of the maternal hepatitis B e antigen status is valuable in the counselling of risks associated with amniocentesis. (II-1C) 2. Amniocentesis in women infected with hepatitis C does not appear to significantly increase the risk of vertical transmission, but women should be counselled that very few studies have properly addressed this possibility. (II-2C) 3. In HIV-positive women all noninvasive screening tools should be used prior to considering amniocentesis. (II-2D) 4. For women infected with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or HIV, the addition of noninvasive methods of prenatal risk screening, such as nuchal translucency, triple screening, and anatomic ultrasound, may help in reducing the age-related risk to a level below the threshold for genetic amniocentesis. (II-2C) 5. For those women infected with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or HIV who insist on amniocentesis, every effort should be made to avoid inserting the needle through the placenta. (II-1B) VALIDATION: These guidelines have been approved by the SOGC Genetics Committee, SOGC Executive, and SOGC Council.
The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.
PubMed ID
12577132 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Clin Obstet Gynecol. 1981 Dec;24(4):1007-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1981
Author
M S Verp
A B Gerbie
Source
Clin Obstet Gynecol. 1981 Dec;24(4):1007-21
Date
Dec-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amniocentesis - adverse effects - methods
Canada
Female
Fetal Death - etiology
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - diagnosis
Great Britain
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple
Prenatal Diagnosis - methods
Rh-Hr Blood-Group System - immunology
Risk
Ultrasonography
United States
Abstract
Amniocentesis is a relatively safe and reliable procedure. However, there probably is a slightly increased risk of fetal loss following amniocentesis (approximately 0.5%). Other risks are minimal. Amniocentesis should be performed by obstetrician-gynecologists familiar with both the indications for the technique of second-trimester genetic amniocentesis. Recent social trends, including the increased availability of medical information to the lay public and the interest of many women in delaying childbearing, will increase public demand for antenatal diagnosis. It is important that obstetrician-gynecologists prepare to meet these demands.
PubMed ID
6800677 View in PubMed
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Amniotic fluid interleukins in Swedish and Mozambican pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64518
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 1996;41(2):113-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
P. Axemo
A. Brauner
M. Pettersson
L. Eriksson
E. Rwamushaija
S. Bergström
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 1996;41(2):113-7
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amniocentesis
Amniotic Fluid - metabolism
Cesarean Section
Female
Humans
Interleukin-6 - metabolism
Interleukin-8 - metabolism
Interleukins - metabolism
Mozambique
Pregnancy
Sialoglycoproteins - metabolism
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), IL-6, IL-8 in amniotic fluid, in a cohort of Swedish pregnant women from early to late pregnancy and Mozambican late pregnant women with and without signs of histologic chorioamnionitis. Eleven Swedish women were studied from early pregnancy (week 16-17) to late pregnancy (week 37-38). Amniotic fluid was collected via amniocentesis in early pregnancy and also in late pregnancy during elective Caesarean section. From Mozambican women, amniotic fluid was harvested transmurally through the uterus wall during elective Caesarean section. Half of the group of 30 women showed histological signs of chorioamnionitis and half of the group did not show such signs. A statistical, significant increase in IL-1ra, Il-6 and IL-8 values from early to late pregnancy was seen in the Swedish pregnant women. Among the Mozambican women, no statistically significant increase in the above-mentioned interleukins was observed when comparing women with and without histological signs of chorioamnionitis. Term Swedish and Mozambican women did not show differences in cytokine levels. There were no detectable values of IL-1 beta in either Swedish or Mozambican women. IL-1ra, IL-6 and IL-8 increased in amniotic fluid from the second to the third trimester in the Swedish cohort. No correlation was found between histological chorioamnionitis and elevated cytokine levels of amniotic fluid in term pregnant women not in labour. An equally good cytokine response was found among Swedish and Mozambican third-trimester non-labouring women.
PubMed ID
8838971 View in PubMed
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Antenatal diagnosis of neural tube defects in Canada: extension of a collaborative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247384
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Mar 17;120(6):653-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-17-1979
Author
N E Simpson
L. Dallaire
J R Miller
L. Siminovitch
J. Miller
J L Hamerton
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Mar 17;120(6):653-7
Date
Mar-17-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amniocentesis
Amniotic Fluid - analysis
Canada
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Neural Tube Defects - diagnosis - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Diagnosis
Prospective Studies
Risk
alpha-Fetoproteins - analysis
Abstract
Experience with the diagnosis of neural tube defects from alpha1-fetoprotein (AFP) concentrations in amniotic fluid is reported from a prospective study of five laboratories testing for 13 Canadian genetic centres. The results of the study indicate that antenatal diagnosis of open neural tube defects is being carried out effectively in Canada (in 99.2% of cases the AFP measurements were interpreted correctly). Amniocentesis should be recommended to women at high risk for having a child with a neural tube defect (i.e., those who have a child, a parent or a sibling with a neural tube defect). The rate of neural tube defects in 182 high-risk pregnancies was 2.2% for an open defect and 1.1% for a closed defect, whereas the rate in 673 pregnancies in which amniocentesis was being performed for other reasons was 0.3%. This suggests that the AFP concentration should be measured in any sample of amniotic fluid collected for other reasons (usually fetal karyotyping). There were three instances of false-negative results, for a rate of 0.4%. Two closed neural tube defects were not detected; this limitation of the test has also been found by others. One of the six fetuses with an open neural tube defect, who died in utero, had a large myelocele in the neck that was not recognized. There were also four instances of false-positive results, for a rate of 0.5%. The findings suggest that AFP values that are more than 2 but less than 7 standard deviations (SDs) above the mean may indicate a neural tube defect, and that values 7 or more SDs above the mean very likely indicate such a defect, although other reasons for such high values (e.g., fetal erythrocytes in the amniotic fluid, intrauterine death and mistaken gestational age) must be ruled out by other methods.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1974 Oct 19;2(7886):939-424138563
Cites: Lancet. 1975 Sep 13;2(7933):49551298
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1976 Jul;48(1):1-559327
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1976 Oct 23;115(8):739-4861796
Cites: Lancet. 1977 Dec 3;2(8049):1168-973073
PubMed ID
86382 View in PubMed
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Antenatal screening for congenital nephrosis in Finland by maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242012
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1983 May;90(5):437-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1983
Author
M. Ryynänen
M. Seppälä
P. Kuusela
J. Rapola
P. Aula
A. Seppä
V. Jokela
O. Castren
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1983 May;90(5):437-42
Date
May-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amniocentesis
Amniotic Fluid - analysis
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mass Screening
Nephrosis - congenital - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Diagnosis
alpha-Fetoproteins - analysis
Abstract
In the Kuopio and North-Karelia districts of Finland 10724 pregnancies were screened for congenital nephrosis by maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) measurement. Outcome was known for 10504 (98%) pregnancies, of which 509 (4 X 8%) had a serum AFP level greater than or equal to 2 X 5 multiples of the normal median (MoM) at 15-18 weeks gestation. After exclusion of those women who had a normal serum AFP level (less than 2 X 5 MoM) in a second sample, 'wrong dates' or multiple pregnancy, 267 (2 X 5%) remained with a high serum AFP level. Amniocentesis was carried out in 225 (2 X 1%) and 16 women had an amniotic fluid AFP level greater than 10 SD above the normal mean. In this group there were six fetuses with congenital nephrosis (four confirmed and two suspected), six other serious malformations (including an intrauterine death) and four without obvious abnormality. In the 98% pregnancies followed up there were no infants with congenital nephrosis that had been missed. Babies with congenital nephrosis require permanent hospitalization and have a mean survival of 8 months. In Finland, within certain areas, the birth prevalence is as high as 1 in 2600 per year. In such areas maternal serum AFP measurement appears to be a useful method of screening for congenital nephrosis. The service was also well accepted since 94% of the women with raised serum AFP levels wished to be screened again in a future pregnancy.
PubMed ID
6189511 View in PubMed
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Aspects of early amniocentesis. A cytogenetic and clinical evaluation of the filter technique.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63530
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2003 Mar;50(1):1-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Karin Sundberg
Author Affiliation
Chromosome Laboratory, Section of Clinical Genetics, Ultrasound Clinic, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, H:S Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2003 Mar;50(1):1-14
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amniocentesis - instrumentation - methods
Chorionic Villi Sampling
Chromosome Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control
Cytogenetic Analysis - instrumentation - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Micropore Filters
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Time Factors
PubMed ID
12705142 View in PubMed
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123 records – page 1 of 13.