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192 records – page 1 of 20.

Abandoned Mid-Canada Radar Line sites in the Western James region of Northern Ontario, Canada: a source of organochlorines for First Nations people?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80754
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Nov 1;370(2-3):452-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2006
Author
Tsuji Leonard J S
Wainman Bruce C
Martin Ian D
Weber Jean-Philippe
Sutherland Celine
Nieboer Evert
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1. ljtsuji@2fes.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Nov 1;370(2-3):452-66
Date
Nov-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Animals
Birds
Diet
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Hazardous Waste
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Male
Mammals
Ontario
Abstract
The potential exists for human exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other contaminants originating from abandoned Mid-Canada Radar Line (MCRL) sites in sub-arctic Canada. We examined patterns of differences with respect to body burden of organochlorines (lipid-adjusted) between residents of the Ontario First Nations of Fort Albany (the site of MCRL Site 050) and Kashechewan (no radar base) and Hamilton (an industrial, southern Ontario community) to assess whether the presence of Site 050 influenced organochlorine body burden with respect to the people of Fort Albany. PCBs (Aroclor 1260 and summation operator14 PCBs congeners [CBs]) and DDE in the plasma of Fort Albany and Kashechewan subjects were elevated relative to Hamilton participants. PCB and DDE-plasma levels in First Nation women were of comparable magnitude to those reported for Inuit women living in the west/central Northwest Territories. Significantly lower DDE/DDT ratios observed for Fort Albany indicates exposure to higher levels of DDT compared to Kashechewan. The probable source of DDT exposure for Fort Albany people is the DDT-contaminated soil surrounding buildings of Site 050. The results of the correspondence analysis (CA) indicated that people from Hamilton had relatively higher pesticides and lower CB body burdens, while people from Fort Albany and Kashechewan exhibited relatively higher CBs and lower pesticide levels (CA-1). The separation of Fort Albany and Kashechewan from Hamilton was also clear using questionnaire data (i.e., plotting dietary principal component [PC]-1 scores against PC-2); PC-1 was correlated with the consumption of a traditional diet. Separation of Kashechewan and Albany residents occurred because the people of Kashechewan ate more traditional meats and consumed shorebirds. Only one significant relationship was found between PC analysis and contaminant loadings; PC-1 versus CA-3 for Kashechewan. The presence of Site 050 on Anderson Island appears to have influenced organochlorine body burden of the people of Fort Albany. ANCOVA results revealed that it was not activity on Anderson Island that was important, but activity on Site 050 was the influential variable. When these results are considered with the DDE/DDT ratio data and the CB 187 results (Fort Albany and Kashechewan residents differed significantly), the findings are suggestive that Site 050 did influence organochlorine body burden of people from Fort Albany.
PubMed ID
16959301 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal grandmothers' experience with health promotion and participatory action research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198754
Source
Qual Health Res. 2000 Mar;10(2):188-213
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
G. Dickson
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2000 Mar;10(2):188-213
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Health Services Research
Humans
Middle Aged
Saskatchewan
Abstract
This article describes a case study examining the effects of participating in a health promotion project, one aspect of which was a health assessment conducted using participatory action research. The study was carried out over 2.5 years in a project for older Aboriginal women (hereafter known as the grandmothers). Participation in the project and health assessment contributed to a number of changes in them, which were categorized as cleansing and healing, connecting with self, acquiring knowledge and skills, connecting within the group, and external exposure and engagement. This experience demonstrated an approach to health promotion programming and conducting a health assessment that was acceptable to this group of people and fostered changes congruent with empowerment.
PubMed ID
10788283 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal healing: regaining balance and culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171195
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Linda M Hunter
Jo Logan
Jean-Guy Goulet
Sylvia Barton
Author Affiliation
The Conference Board of Canada.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Spiritual Therapies
Urban Population
Abstract
This ethnographic study explored the question, How do urban-based First Nations peoples use healing traditions to address their health issues? The objectives were to examine how Aboriginal traditions addressed health issues and explore the link between such traditions and holism in nursing practice. Data collection consisted of individual interviews, participant observations, and field notes. Three major categories that emerged from the data analysis were: following a cultural path, gaining balance, and sharing in the circle of life. The global theme of healing holistically included following a cultural path by regaining culture through the use of healing traditions; gaining balance in the four realms of spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical health; and sharing in the circle of life by cultural interactions between Aboriginal peoples and non-Aboriginal health professionals. Implications for practice include incorporating the concepts of balance, holism, and cultural healing into the health care services for diverse Aboriginal peoples.
PubMed ID
16410432 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Aust N Z J Public Health. 1996 Aug;20(4):441
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
J F Thompson
Source
Aust N Z J Public Health. 1996 Aug;20(4):441
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Health Personnel
Health promotion
Humans
Northwest Territories
Notes
Comment On: Aust N Z J Public Health. 1996 Jun;20(3):227-98768407
PubMed ID
8908775 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal spirituality: symbolic healing in Canadian prisons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220386
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1993 Sep;17(3):345-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
J B Waldram
Author Affiliation
Department of Native Studies, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1993 Sep;17(3):345-62
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Healing - psychology
Mental health
Prisoners - psychology
Religion and Psychology
Abstract
Symbolic healing is a complex phenomenon that is still relatively poorly understood. This paper documents a process of symbolic healing which is occurring in Canadian penitentiaries, and which involves Aboriginal offenders in cultural awareness and educational programs. The situation is compounded, however, by the existence of offenders from diverse Aboriginal cultural backgrounds with differing degrees of orientation to Aboriginal and Euro-Canadian cultures. Participants must first receive the necessary education to allow them to identify with the healing symbols so that healing may ensue, and both the healers and the patients must engage in a process of redefining their cultures in search of a common cultural base.
PubMed ID
8269714 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal suicide in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210445
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 1996 Dec;83(3 Pt 2):1202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
D. Lester
Author Affiliation
Psychology Program, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona 08240-0195, USA.
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 1996 Dec;83(3 Pt 2):1202
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Risk factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
9017732 View in PubMed
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Absence of association between genetic variation of the beta 3-adrenergic receptor and metabolic phenotypes in Oji-Cree.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205667
Source
Diabetes Care. 1998 May;21(5):851-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
R A Hegele
S B Harris
A J Hanley
H. Azouz
P W Connelly
B. Zinman
Author Affiliation
Blackburn Cardiovascular Genetics Laboratory, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada. robert.hegele@rri.on.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 1998 May;21(5):851-4
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adult
Alleles
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body constitution
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Phenotype
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta - genetics
Abstract
To assess the association between the common missense variant, Y64R, in the gene encoding the beta 3-adrenergic receptor, ADRB3, and intermediate phenotypes related to obesity and NIDDM in Canadian Oji-Cree.
We determined genotypes of the ADRB3 Y64R polymorphism in 508 clinically and biochemically well-characterized adult Oji-Cree, of whom 115 had NIDDM. We tested for associations with multivariate analysis of variance.
We found the ADRB3 R64 allele frequency to be 0.40 in this population, which is the highest yet observed in a human population. Furthermore, 15% of subjects were R64/R64 homozygotes, compared with a virtual absence of homozygotes in European study samples. However, we found no statistically significant associations of the ADRB3 Y64R genotype either with the presence of NIDDM, with indexes of obesity, or with intermediate quantitative biochemical traits related to NIDDM.
Despite the very high frequency of the ADRB3 R64 allele in this sample of aboriginal people, it was not associated with any metabolic phenotype. This suggests that the ADRB3 R64 allele is probably not a major determinant of obesity or NIDDM in these aboriginal Canadians.
PubMed ID
9589254 View in PubMed
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Adolescent use of prescription drugs to get high in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118246
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;57(12):745-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Cheryl L Currie
T Cameron Wild
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta. cheryl.currie@uleth.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;57(12):745-51
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Analgesics, Opioid
Canada - epidemiology
Central Nervous System Stimulants
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Male
Prescription Drug Misuse
Prescription Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
To present epidemiologic information on adolescent use of prescription drugs to get high, and not for medical purposes, in Canada.
Data were obtained from 44 344 adolescents in grades 7 to 12 living across Canada's 10 provinces who completed the Youth Smoking Survey in 2008/2009.
Nationally, 5.9% of adolescents in grades 7 to 12 reported the use of prescription drugs to get high in the past 12 months in 2008/2009. Females were more likely to report use of pain relievers, sedatives, or tranquilizers to get high, while males were more likely to report the use of prescription stimulants for this purpose. The use of prescription drugs to get high was elevated among older youth, those living in British Columbia, and those who identified as First Nations, M?tis, or Inuit. School connectedness was associated with a reduction in this form of prescription drug misuse for all adolescents; however, this protective effect was particularly strong for Aboriginal youth, and may be an important preventative factor for this population.
Use of prescription drugs to get high was prevalent among adolescents in Canada in 2008/2009. Findings highlight the need for clinicians to include questions about prescription drugs when screening adolescents for substance abuse in Canada. Findings also highlight the need for evidence-informed strategies to reduce prescription drug misuse among Aboriginal youth living outside First Nations communities in Canada. The results of this study suggest school connectedness may be a particularly important target for these interventions.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Psychiatry. 2013 May;58(5):30823802248
Comment In: Can J Psychiatry. 2013 May;58(5):30823802247
PubMed ID
23228233 View in PubMed
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Age-related immunogenicity of meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine in aboriginal children and adolescents living in a Northern Manitoba reserve community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33624
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1998 Oct;17(10):860-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
B J Law
T. Rosenberg
N E MacDonald
F E Ashton
J C Huang
W J King
W J Ferris
G J Gray
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Canada. blaw@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1998 Oct;17(10):860-4
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Antibodies, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Bacterial Vaccines - immunology
Carrier State - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Manitoba - epidemiology
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Meningococcal Vaccines
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - immunology - isolation & purification
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotyping
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the total and functional serogroup C antibody response to a quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine in a group of aboriginal infants, children and adolescents. A secondary objective was to determine their prevalence of meningococcal carriage. DESIGN: Open prospective, before and after intervention study. SUBJECTS: Aboriginal children ages 0.5 to 19.9 years, living in a single Northern community and eligible for a public health immunization campaign conducted in all Manitoba native reserve communities to control a meningococcal serogroup C, electrophoretic type (ET) 15 outbreak. No outbreak cases had occurred in the community at the time of the study. METHODS: Total serogroup C capsular polysaccharide antibody (CPA) and functional bactericidal antibody (BA) responses were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and bactericidal assay, respectively. RESULTS: Neisseria meningitidis was recovered from the oropharynx of 13 (5.2%) of 249 aboriginal children including 4 (1.6%) serogroup C isolates, all with the designation C:2a:P1.2,5 ET15. Paired sera from 152 children were available for assay. For CPA the geometric mean concentrations and proportions with > or =2 microg/ml before and after immunization were 0.69, 18% and 12.3, 96%, respectively. A significant increase in serum CPA was achieved by children of all ages, with the greatest response occurring after age 11 years. Among infants or =2 microg/ml. For BA the pre- and post-vaccine geometric mean titers were 1.02 and 45.9. The response was significantly associated with age. BA titers > or =1:8 were present, before and after immunization, respectively, in 0 and 0% of infants or =2-year-olds. CONCLUSION: The age-related total and functional group C meningococcal antibody response after quadrivalent polysaccharide vaccine among aboriginals is similar to that reported for Caucasian children. After age 2 all children made excellent CPA and BA responses. In the younger age groups the BA response was blunted but 82 to 95% achieved CPA titers of > or =2 microg/ml.
PubMed ID
9802625 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Jan-Feb;84 Suppl 1:S46-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
D T Lambert
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Jan-Feb;84 Suppl 1:S46-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control - psychology - transmission
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Child
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Sex Education
Sick Role
Social Environment
Abstract
A concise portrait of HIV and AIDS within the Aboriginal community is difficult to present. Just as there are different customs and traditions among tribes, so are there different ways by which this issue is being addressed. The response to HIV/AIDS in the Aboriginal community is the process of moving from an individual or personal perspective to an immediate and extended family approach through the community, nation or society, and finally to the greater picture, Mother Earth. We don't necessarily move through in this order, rather we go back and forth as the need arises. When we deal with HIV or AIDS, it is important to view how this will affect our whole life: physical, mental, emotional and spiritual aspects of ourselves as well as financial, psychosocial and other dimensions. The teachings and study of children, youth, adults and elders are also discussed. We recognize the work we do in this area now will be a tool for survival in the future.
PubMed ID
8481869 View in PubMed
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192 records – page 1 of 20.