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Achieving best practice in long term care for Alaska Native and American Indian elders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273782
Date
Sept-2005
1 National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders Achieving Best Practice in Long Term Care for Alaska Native and American Indian Elders Prepared by P. Kay Branch, M.A. Stacy L. Smith, MFA (Editor
  1 document  
Author
Branch, PK
Smith, SL
Author Affiliation
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Sept-2005
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Native
American Indian
Home care
Long Term Care
Service models
Abstract
In rural Alaska, there are particular challenges in delivering services that may be typically available to seniors in more urban areas. There are, however, an increasing number of tribally operated programs in Alaska with a focus on Alaska Native values and traditions that are assisting families in keeping their loved ones close to home. These programs are the tribal health system's emerging best practices.
Documents

yr2_1best-practices.pdf

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Alcohol-attributable deaths and years of potential life lost among American Indians and Alaska Natives

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87788
Source
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Naimi, T.S., Cobb, N., Boyd, D., Jarman, D.W., Brewer, R., Nelson, D.E., Holt, J., Epsey, D., Snesud, P, Chavez, P.
Source
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
life span, alcoholism, American Indian, Alaska Native, public health
Abstract
Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading preventable cause of death in the United States and has substantial public health impact on American Indian and Alaska Native populations.
Notes
2001-2005 Evaluation
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Source
Public Health Reports. 1962 Dec;77(12):1021-1032
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1962
  1 website  
Author
Porter, M.E.
Comstock, G.W.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Public Health Reports. 1962 Dec;77(12):1021-1032
Date
Dec-1962
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Chemotherapy
Chemotherapy aides
Evaluation
INH
Inuits
North American Indians
PAS
Pulmonary tuberculosis
Abstract
Because ambulatory chemotherapy in Alaska was an apparently successful pioneering project, and because ambulatory chemotherapy has become a major element in tuberculosis controlin many areas, the Alaskan experience may interest those who have similar problems and responsibilities in bringing public health to peoples of other cultures. In addition to reviewing the history of the ambulatory chemotherapy program in Alaska, we have also attempted to estimate its effectiveness for patients awaitinghospitalization.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1769.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 619.
PubMed ID
13985571 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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American Indian/Alaska Native Suicide Task Force Report

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102408
Date
Apr-1996
  1 document  
Author
Keith, SJ
Eicke, A
Manson, S
Shaffer, D
Thompson, J
Author Affiliation
University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center
University of Colorado Health Sciences
Columbia University
University of Maryland
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Adolescent suicide
American Indians/Alaska Natives
Crisis Intervention
Depression
Education
Identification
Prevention
Research
Resources
Substance abuse
Suicide
Treatment
Abstract
The American Indian/Alaska Native Suicide Task Force Report was developed at the request of Senator Pete Domenici and HHS Secretary Donna Shalala for an outside review of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) suicide. The report describes the nature and purpose of the AI/AN Suicide Task Force, outlines the history of federal and tribal concern about AI/AN suicide, reviews relevant literature on suicide among AI/ANs and in the general population, describes existing suicide prevention and intervention programs for AI/ANs, summarizes the resources currently available, and ends with a summary of the relevant findings and specific recommendations for action.
Documents

TaskForceReport_19960422

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American Indian/Alaska Native uninsurance disparities: A comparison of 3 surveys

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99194
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2010 Oct;100(10):1972-1979
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Johnson, PJ
Blewett, LA
Call, KT
Davern, M
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2010 Oct;100(10):1972-1979
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska Natives
American Indians
Current Population Survey (CPS)
Health care disparities
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS)
National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)
Non-Hispanic whites
Uninsurance rates
Abstract
Objectives. We examined whether 3 nationally representative data sources produce consistent estimates of disparities and rates of uninsurance among the American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) population and to demonstrate how choice of data source impacts study conclusions. Methods. We estimated all-year and point-in-time uninsurance rates for AIANs and non-Hispanic Whites younger than 65 years using 3 surveys: Current Population Survey (CPS), National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), and Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Results. Sociodemographic differences across surveys suggest that national samples produce differing estimates of the AIAN population. AIAN all-year uninsurance rates varied across surveys (3%-23% for children and 18%-35% for adults). Measures of disparity also differed by survey. For all-year uninsurance, the unadjusted rate for AIAN children was 2.9 times higher than the rate for White children with the CPS, but there were no significant disparities with the NHIS or MEPS. Compared with White adults, AIAN adults had unadjusted rate ratios of 2.5 with the CPS and 2.2 with the NHIS or MEPS. Conclusions. Different data sources produce substantially different estimates for the same population. Consequently, conclusions about health care disparities may be influenced by the data source used. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print August 19, 2010: e1-e8. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2009.167247).
PubMed ID
20724698 View in PubMed
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American Indian and Alaska Native Genetics Research Policy Formulation Meeting: Summary meeting report

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100791
Source
Summary of meeting held February 7-9, 2001, in Rio Rancho, New Mexico.
Date
2001
Author
National Institute of General Medical Sciences
National Human Genome Research Institute
Source
Summary of meeting held February 7-9, 2001, in Rio Rancho, New Mexico.
Date
2001
Language
English
Keywords
American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN)
Data storage
Disclosure
Genetics research policy
Tribal concerns
Abstract
The purpose of the meeting was to begin the process of creating procedures and documents that could be instructive to both tribal communities and researchers about the conduct of genetics research involving American Indian and Alaska Native people and their communities. The meeting was not organized as a summit of representative genetics research issues, but was intended to be an intense round-table work session with discussion of tribal concerns, tribal expectations, the process of research, existing genetic studies, research codes, and existing genetics policies. No formal presentations were given.
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American Indian community leader and provider views of needs and barriers to mammography

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101408
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Apr;37(2):307-315
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Daley, CM
Filippi, M
James, AS
Weir, M
Braiuca, S
Kaur, B
Choi, WS
Greiner, KA
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine & Public Health, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA, cdaley@kumc.edu.
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Apr;37(2):307-315
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Indian
Barriers to care
Breast cancer
Community-Based Participatory Research
Mammography
Abstract
Breast cancer incidence is rising and mortality is disproportionately high among American Indians and Alaska Natives, yet screening rates remain low. Using community-based participatory research, we conducted interviews with community leaders (n=13) and providers from the Indian Health Service, tribal clinics, and urban safety-net clinics (n=17). Participants in both groups identified similar needs, including culturally-appropriate mammography education, use of Native elders as patient navigators, and an emphasis on preventive care. Pertinent barriers included culturally-specific issues (e.g., historic mistrust and gender roles), cost, transportation, and fear of mammography and potential results. The results reflect the struggles of promoting mammography across diverse populations.
PubMed ID
21786207 View in PubMed
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American Indian health: Innovations in health care, promotion, and policy

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102365
Source
Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2000
Author
Rhoades, E, ed.
Source
Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aboriginal peoples
Alaska Natives
Alcoholism
American Indians
Cancer
Cardiovascular diseases
Demographics
Diabetes
Diet
Diseases
Environmental health
Genetic polymorphism
Health conditions
Health status
Indian health services
Maternal, child, and youth health
Mental health
Nutrition
Oral Health
Research ethics
Substance abuse
Suicide
Tobacco use
Traditional medicine
Abstract
Part I: Demographics of Indian health
Part II: Political and administrative bases of Indian health
Part III: Major diseases and health conditions affecting Indians
Part IV: Special cultural and ethical considerations
Notes
Available at UAA/APU Consortium Library, General Collection, W84.AA1 A512 2000
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American Indian mental health research: Local control and cultural sensitivity

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101996
Source
White Cloud Journal of American Indian/Alaska Native Mental Health. 1978;1(1):15-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Spr-1978
Author
Ryan, RA
Spence, JD
Source
White Cloud Journal of American Indian/Alaska Native Mental Health. 1978;1(1):15-18
Date
Spr-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Natives
American Indians
Cultural sensitivity
Indigenous interviewers
Mental health
Native control
Program Development
Research
Abstract
Despite much research, study after study and report after report, researchers have been able to report no improvement in mental health of American Indians and Alaska Natives. There has been a lack of relevancy of research to program development and problem solving. Communication between researchers and their subject Indian communities and between researchers themselves has apparently been faulty.
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American Indians and Alaska Natives in nursing homes: initial results from the 2008 minimum data set.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301042
Source
Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health 10(1) 2012: p.109-123.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
© Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health 10(1) 2012 109 Abstract This study questions the assumption that American Indian and Alaska Natives (AIANs) provide care for their frail older adults within the community. Using the Minimum Data Set (MDS) this
  1 document  
Author
Mario D. Garrett
Dave Baldridge
Erin Williams
Source
Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health 10(1) 2012: p.109-123.
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
247491
Keywords
Aging
American Indian
Alaska Native
Nursing home
Continuum of care
MDS, Minimum Data Set
Independence
ADL, activities of daily living
Family
Socializing
Missing cohort
Dementia
Cognitive impairment
Demographic
Indigenous
Abstract
This study questions the assumption that American Indian and Alaska Natives (AIANs) provide care for their frail older adults within the community. Using the Minimum Data Set (MDS) this study examined the status of Native elders in nursing homes compared to the white residents. The initial results indicate that AIANs enter the nursing homes at earlier stages of need and are more likely to be independent than white patients. In addition, AIANs were more likely to have lived alone or in another nursing home or residential facility prior to their present nursing home. This study is a wakeup call to examine the continuum of care for American Indian and Alaska Native elders. With the migration of young people out of Native communities, and with a lack of social services infrastructure, Native elders are being placed in nursing homes much earlier than necessary and earlier than whites.
Documents

09GarrettBaldridgeNew.pdf

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66 records – page 1 of 7.