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[20 years of a sex education clinic. Are family planning centers still needed?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224305
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Feb 28;112(6):781-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-1992
Author
G C Alfsen
S. Hokstad
Author Affiliation
Klinikk for seksuell opplysning, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Feb 28;112(6):781-4
Date
Feb-28-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities - history - trends
Family Planning Services - history - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics - trends
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Norway
Sex Education - history - trends
Abstract
The Sexual Information Clinic in Oslo was founded more than 20 years ago. The clinic is the largest family planning centre in Norway, treating 4,000-6,000 patients per year. In recent years the treatment of venereal diseases has become the major component of the daily work. The authors describe the different groups of patients who visit the clinic. The meanage of the patients is 21 years. The high number of legal abortions among younger women and the rising incidence of sexually transmitted diseases prove the continued existence of a need for family planning centres. The authors discuss the situation of family planning centres in Norway in general and stress the importance of their work. They argue that all venereal diseases should be treated free of charge.
PubMed ID
1561604 View in PubMed
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Abstinence-orientated buprenorphine replacement therapy for young adults in out-patient counselling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82423
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2006 Mar;25(2):123-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Kornør Hege
Waal Helge
Ali Robert L
Author Affiliation
Unit for Addiction Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. hege.kornor@kunnskapssenteret.no
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2006 Mar;25(2):123-30
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Buprenorphine - administration & dosage
Counseling
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Humans
Male
Narcotic Antagonists - administration & dosage
Norway
Opioid-Related Disorders - drug therapy
Outpatients
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study assessed treatment retention, compliance and completion of a 9-month buprenorphine replacement programme. In addition, changes in drug use and other relevant variables, as well as predictors of completion, were examined. Seventy-five opioid-dependent out-patients (mean age 26 years; 33% females) who aimed for opioid abstinence were enrolled into the study. Assessments were undertaken prior to buprenorphine induction and again at 3, 6 and 9 months. Forty patients (53%) completed the buprenorphine programme. At 9 months, 67 patients (87%) were still in counselling. Mean attendance rates for buprenorphine dosing and counselling sessions were 0.91 and 0.74, respectively. There were significant and persistent reductions in drug use during treatment with, however, a reversed tendency in the 9th month. Psychiatric problems escalated at 9 months, and three patients died during the detoxification phase. Completion was predicted by fewer previous treatment episodes. Detoxification from buprenorphine is associated with substantial psychological distress and an increased death risk. Buprenorphine replacement therapy should be continued until the patient chooses to leave, and close monitoring during the detoxification phase is essential.
PubMed ID
16627301 View in PubMed
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Access to fertility services for lesbian women in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112457
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Oct;100(4):1077-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Shannon L Corbett
Helena M Frecker
Heather M Shapiro
Mark H Yudin
Author Affiliation
Ottawa Fertility Centre, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: scorbett@conceive.ca.
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Oct;100(4):1077-80
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities - organization & administration
Canada
Female
Fertility
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Healthcare Disparities
Homosexuality, Female
Humans
Questionnaires
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted
Sex Factors
Women's Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
To determine reproductive services offered to lesbian patients by Canadian fertility clinics, policies of practice, ease of access to these services, and sensitivity of clinics to this population of patients.
Survey sent to assisted reproductive technology (ART) clinic directors.
Academic medical center, university-based ethics institute.
None.
The percentage of Canadian fertility clinics that will provide reproductive services to lesbian patients; services offered; the presence of clinic policies on lesbian care; and the presence on web sites of heteronormative material.
Completed surveys were received from 71% (24/34) of clinics. All clinics surveyed provided reproductive services to lesbian patients, with the exception of one clinic. Five of 24 (21%) clinics have a written policy on care for lesbian patients; 29% (7/24) will provide services to lesbian patients without prior investigations. All clinics will offer IUI and cycle monitoring to lesbian patients. Twenty-three of 24 clinics (96%) will offer IVF services when required. Fourteen of 32 clinic web sites (44%) make mention of lesbian patients and 27% (8/30) have heteronormative information only.
Lesbians encounter several barriers to accessing reproductive services in Canada. Addressing these issues could improve experiences of lesbian women and couples seeking care at fertility clinics.
PubMed ID
23830154 View in PubMed
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Access to pediatric rheumatology subspecialty care in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153253
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Feb;36(2):410-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Natalie J Shiff
Reem Abdwani
David A Cabral
Kristin M Houghton
Peter N Malleson
Ross E Petty
Victor M Espinosa
Lori B Tucker
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, BC Children's Hospital, Room K4-120, 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC V6H 3V4. nshiff@cw.bc.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Feb;36(2):410-5
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Ambulatory Care Facilities
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Medicine - statistics & numerical data - trends
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data - trends
Parents
Pediatrics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data - trends
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Rheumatic Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Specialization
Time Factors
Abstract
Early recognition and treatment of pediatric rheumatic diseases is associated with improved outcome. We documented access to pediatric rheumatology subspecialty care for children in British Columbia (BC), Canada, referred to the pediatric rheumatology clinic at BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver.
An audit of new patients attending the outpatient clinic from May 2006 to February 2007 was conducted. Parents completed a questionnaire through a guided interview at the initial clinic assessment. Referral dates were obtained from the referral letters. Patients were classified as having rheumatic disease, nonrheumatic disease, or a pain syndrome based on final diagnosis by a pediatric rheumatologist.
Data were collected from 124 of 203 eligible new patients. Before pediatric rheumatology assessment, a median of 3 healthcare providers were seen (range 1-11) for a median of 5 visits (range 1-39). Overall, the median time interval from symptom onset to pediatric rheumatology assessment was 268 days (range 13-4989), and the median time interval from symptom onset to referral to pediatric rheumatology was 179 days (range 3-4970). Among patients ultimately diagnosed with rheumatic diseases (n = 53), there was a median of 119 days (range 3-4970) from symptom onset to referral, and 169 days (range 31-4989) from onset to pediatric rheumatology assessment.
Children and adolescents with rheumatic complaints see multiple care providers for multiple visits before referral to pediatric rheumatology, and there is often a long interval between symptom onset and this referral.
PubMed ID
19132779 View in PubMed
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[Active detection of patients with hypertension in a polyclinic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241763
Source
Vrach Delo. 1983 Jul;(7):61-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983

Active multimodal psychotherapy in children and adolescents with suicidality: description, evaluation and clinical profile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92095
Source
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;13(3):435-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Högberg Goran
Hällström Tore
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. gor.hogberg@gmail.com
Source
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;13(3):435-48
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Ambulatory Care Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Child
Combined Modality Therapy
Desensitization, Psychologic - methods
Eye Movements - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Program Evaluation - methods
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychodrama - methods
Psychotherapy - methods
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate the clinical pattern of 14 youths with presenting suicidality, to describe an integrative treatment approach, and to estimate therapy effectiveness. Fourteen patients aged 10 to 18 years from a child and adolescent outpatient clinic in Stockholm were followed in a case series. The patients were treated with active multimodal psychotherapy. This consisted of mood charting by mood-maps, psycho-education, wellbeing practice and trauma resolution. Active techniques were psychodrama and body-mind focused techniques including eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. The patients were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment and at 22 months post treatment with the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. The clinical pattern of the group was observed. After treatment there was a significant change towards normality in the Global Assessment of Functioning scale both immediately post-treatment and at 22 months. A clinical pattern, post trauma suicidal reaction, was observed with a combination of suicidality, insomnia, bodily symptoms and disturbed mood regulation. We conclude that in the post trauma reaction suicidality might be a presenting symptom in young people. Despite the shortcomings of a case series the results of this study suggest that a mood-map-based multimodal treatment approach with active techniques might be of value in the treatment of children and youth with suicidality.
PubMed ID
18783125 View in PubMed
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[Activities of consultative and diagnostic polyclinics and centers in Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103565
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1990;(9):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
T N Boborykina
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1990;(9):26-9
Date
1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities - organization & administration
Diagnostic Services
Female
Humans
Male
Moscow
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
The article provides an evaluation of activities of consulting and diagnostic centres (CDC) which operate on the basis of Moscow multi-disciplinary hospitals. The existence of CDC oriented towards secondary (after screening at polyclinics and according to their referrals) screening of patients in accordance with in-depth programme and provision of consultations is justified and permits to raise the quality of medical care for the population.
PubMed ID
2255977 View in PubMed
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[Acute sensorineural hearing loss (data of the otorhinolaryngologic clinic of the I.M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211943
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 1996 May-Jun;(3):12-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu M Ovchinnikov
N P Konstantinova
L N Mal'nikova
S V Morozova
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 1996 May-Jun;(3):12-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - history
Acute Disease
Ambulatory Care Facilities - history
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - diagnosis - therapy
History, 20th Century
Humans
Hyperbaric Oxygenation
Moscow
Otolaryngology - history
Reflexotherapy
Abstract
The authors review the history of the research on acute neurosensory hypoacusis performed at the chair of ENT diseases of the I. M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Institute in 1916-1995. Etiological, pathogenetic, clinical, therapeutic and prophylactic aspects are considered. The investigators have developed and introduced into practice combined treatment of acute neurosensory hypoacusis the primary components of which are immediate hospitalization, chemotherapy in line with hyperbaric oxygenation and reflex therapy.
PubMed ID
8928368 View in PubMed
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ADCS Prevention Instrument Project: quality of life assessment (QOL).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79595
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4 Suppl 3):S179-90
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patterson Marian B
Whitehouse Peter J
Edland Steven D
Sami Susie A
Sano Mary
Smyth Kathleen
Weiner Myron F
Author Affiliation
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. marian.patterson@case.edu
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4 Suppl 3):S179-90
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Postal Service
Primary Prevention
Proxy
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Assessment (Psychology)
United States
Abstract
Information about quality of life (QOL) is valuable in evaluating pharmaceutical agents but it is not adequately assessed in many dementia drug trials. In prevention trials, following participants to conversion to AD requires QOL scales appropriate for both normal and cognitively impaired individuals. Our objective was to evaluate the utility of several scales for subject or informant QOL assessment: Quality of Life-AD; Quality of Life Activity Inventory; SF-36; SF-12 (a shortened version of the SF-36); and Satisfaction with Life Scale. Measurements were collected from 644 subject-study partner pairs, half of whom completed the instruments at the clinic and half at home. Three-month test-retest data were collected. Scales administered at home or in clinic did not differ significantly. Subject self-ratings showed a wide range for all scales. Test-retest intraclass coefficients ranged from 0.67 to 0.77. Moderately high interscale associations suggest that the scales are measuring common aspects of QOL but are not equivalent. Furthermore, they differed with respect to associations with demographic variables and QOL determinants. We conclude that the QOL scores at baseline show sufficient range and reliability to suggest they will have utility in tracking QOL through conversion to dementia.
PubMed ID
17135811 View in PubMed
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Addressing male sexuality: a perspective from Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75082
Source
Plan Parent Chall. 1996;(2):41-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
B A Rix
Source
Plan Parent Chall. 1996;(2):41-4
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Behavior
Counseling
Demography
Denmark
Developed Countries
Economics
Europe
Family Planning Services
Health planning
Health services needs and demand
Organization and Administration
Personality
Population
Population Characteristics
Psychology
Scandinavia
Sexuality
Social Behavior
Abstract
Family planning associations (FPAs) in the Scandinavian countries know the importance of addressing the needs of male adolescents and young men. Even though sex education is part of school curricula in Denmark, many young men lack good and confident counsellors to give them advice about sexuality and reproduction. In Denmark, almost half of men aged 16-20 years never talk to their parents about sexuality. It should therefore not be surprising that more than two-thirds of callers to the Danish FPA's, and other European FPAs', anonymous sex counseling telephone line are male. Many of the questions asked by young men indicate insecurity about sexual activity and what is perceived to be sexually normal. FPAs can play a vital role in providing counselling to boys and young men. Male discussion groups can help identify the needs of boys and young. Involving adolescents and the importance of the male perspective are discussed.
PubMed ID
12291944 View in PubMed
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673 records – page 1 of 68.