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61 records – page 1 of 7.

[Acute need of registration of ambulance crash-related injuries]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82645
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Feb 8-14;103(6):372-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lundälv Jörgen
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för socialt arbete, Göteborgs universitet. jorgen.lundalv@socwork.gu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Feb 8-14;103(6):372-4
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Ambulances - standards
Automobile Driving - standards
Humans
Police
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
PubMed ID
16536041 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jun 25;152(26):1881
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-25-1990

[Air ambulances--a question of medical technological safety].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195886
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Dec 13;97(50):5924-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-13-2000
Author
J. Bennis
G. Liedström
Author Affiliation
Anestesikliniken, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Mölndal.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Dec 13;97(50):5924-5
Date
Dec-13-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Ambulances - standards
Equipment Safety
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
11188536 View in PubMed
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Air ambulance trauma transport: a quality review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211636
Source
J Trauma. 1996 Jul;41(1):26-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
M. van Wijngaarden
J. Kortbeek
R. Lafreniere
R. Cunningham
E. Joughin
R. Yim
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 1996 Jul;41(1):26-31
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Ambulances - standards
Alberta
Female
Humans
Male
Quality Control
Quality of Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Triage - utilization
Utilization Review
Wounds and Injuries
Abstract
Provincial air ambulance transports of injured patients were quality reviewed prospectively to determine utilization and appropriateness of care.
All trauma air ambulance transports over a 2-month span were reviewed prospectively. Revised Trauma Score, Injury Severity Score, probability of survival, prehospital time, distance of transport, procedures performed, and outcome were determined. Quality control questions were asked of the sending and receiving physicians.
The majority of air ambulance transports reviewed (N = 97) were indicated for mechanism and severity of injury. Economics and requirement for advanced medical care were indications in only 15%. Physicians tended to perform more advanced procedures, likely related to higher patient Injury Severity Score (23 vs. 15, p = NS). Four problems with air ambulance access were identified. The overtriage rate was 5%. Inappropriate patient care was documented in six (6%) cases; a physician was present for only one of these.
A low overtriage rate was documented, raising concerns that the undertriage rate may be too high. Injured patients air transported without physician accompaniment more often received inappropriate care, suggesting that physician accompaniment is beneficial.
PubMed ID
8676420 View in PubMed
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Air medical transport of suspected aortic emergencies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190331
Source
Air Med J. 2002 May-Jun;21(3):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Alex D Mitchell
John M Tallon
Author Affiliation
Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Division of Emergency Medicine, EHS Lifeflight of Nova Scotia.
Source
Air Med J. 2002 May-Jun;21(3):34-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Ambulances - standards - utilization
Aneurysm, Dissecting - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Aortic Rupture - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Cohort Studies
Diagnostic Errors
Emergency Treatment - standards
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Program Evaluation
Quality of Health Care
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To review and characterize 4 years of experience with suggested nontraumatic aortic emergencies (dissections/ruptures) transported by a new, provincially dedicated rotor-wing air medical program
Retrospective 4-year review of air medical program's mission records and review of related hospital records. Patients listed as suspected aortic emergencies (nontraumatic) in the air medical records were included. Mission records were reviewed for EMS diagnosis, blood pressures before and after transport, transport times, and mortality. Hospital records were reviewed for diagnosis, interventions/treatment, and mortality. Blood pressures below 80 mmHg systolic were considered hemodynamically unstable.
A cohort of 34 patients were identified, of whom 31 (91%) arrived at the hospital alive. Twenty-five patients (74%) arrived hemodynamically stable, with a mean out-of-hospital time of 60 minutes, and nine patients (26%) were hemodynamically unstable (mean out-of-hospital time was 54 minutes). No significant difference arose in times between these two groups (P = 0.16). Overall mortality was 53% (18). Differences in transport time between survivors and deaths was not statistically significant (P = 0.93). The diagnoses on admission to hospital: 14 (41%) were RAAA, five (15%) AAA no rupture, eight (24%) aortic dissections, and four (12%) had no aortic pathology. Seventeen patients (50%) received emergent surgical intervention. The EMS diagnosis was correct in 76% of cases.
Our program transported 34 suspected aortic emergencies of which 17 were immediate surgical candidates on arrival. Aortic emergencies are not infrequent within our program. Specific policies and procedures based on continuing quality review should be in place to optimize the transport and care of these patients.
PubMed ID
11994732 View in PubMed
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Air transport of the sick newborn infant: audit from a sparsely populated county in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57278
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1999 Jan;88(1):66-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
J. Holt
I. Fagerli
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Nordland Central Hospital, Bodø, Norway.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1999 Jan;88(1):66-71
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Ambulances - standards - utilization
Birth weight
Body temperature
Catchment Area (Health)
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Audit
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Rural Health Services
Rural Population
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe principal problems and to analyse transport times, stabilizing procedures, adverse events during transfer, outcome, effectiveness and the care of infants transferred by air from district general hospitals and maternity homes to a central hospital. Transfer times, equipment adverse events and clinical deterioration were recorded as they occurred. Data regarding clinical problems, diagnoses and outcome were collected retrospectively from hospital records. During the study period (1984-95) 275 infants (267 transports) were transferred by fixed-wing aircraft (233) or helicopter (34). Median time from request of transfer to arrival of the transport team (usually a neonatal nurse and a paediatrician) was 120 min, median stabilizing time 60 min. Ninety-six infants (35%) were intubated, 62 (22.5%) by the transport team. During 34 transports (12.7%), equipment-related adverse events occurred making six infants worse. Ten more infants deteriorated during transit. A significant correlation between birthweight and after-transfer temperature was recorded. After-transfer temperature for very low birthweight (
PubMed ID
10090551 View in PubMed
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[Ambulance activities in the county of Skaraborg are improved with the help of military helicopters]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55217
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Oct 30;88(44):3687-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1991

[Ambulance response intervals in connection with cardiac arrest in Oslo]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53934
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 20;121(8):900-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2001
Author
K. Sunde
K O Fremstad
J. Furuheim
P A Steen
Author Affiliation
Anestesiavdelingen, Kirurgisk divisjon Ullevål sykehus 0407 Oslo. kjetil.sunde@ioks.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 20;121(8):900-3
Date
Mar-20-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances - standards - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Medical Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Heart Arrest - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Time and Motion Studies
Urban Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: An important factor determining survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is how fast the ambulance personnel can reach the patient. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a two-year period between 1996 and 1998, all ambulance calls to patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Oslo were evaluated. Of 1,026 cardiac arrests, 130 were excluded because of missing data. RESULTS: The median ambulance response interval was 7.2 min (5.7-9.0 as 25-75% percentiles). There was a tendency to shorter response intervals to the central parts of Oslo with medians between 3 and 4 min, while 14 more peripheral boroughs had median response intervals over 8 min. Of the 627 cases where the ambulance starting point was registered, 76% were from the only ambulance station in Oslo, located downtown. INTERPRETATION: In our opinion, the median ambulance response interval is unsatisfactory in large parts of Oslo, as a long response time gives a dramatically lower survival rate after cardiac arrest. A reorganisation and decentralization of the Oslo Emergency Medical Service System seems necessary.
PubMed ID
11332374 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 20;121(8):899
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2001
Author
D. Haga
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 20;121(8):899
Date
Mar-20-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances - standards
Emergency Medical Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Norway
PubMed ID
11332373 View in PubMed
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61 records – page 1 of 7.