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Source
Sygeplejersken. 1997 Oct 10;97(41):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-1997

"A call for a clear assignment" - A focus group study of the ambulance service in Sweden, as experienced by present and former employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292617
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 01; 36:1-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2018
Author
Helena Rosén
Johan Persson
Andreas Rantala
Lina Behm
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, SE 221 00 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: helena.rosen@med.lu.se.
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 01; 36:1-6
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances - manpower
Attitude of Health Personnel
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Emergency Medical Technicians - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Workplace - psychology - standards
Abstract
The aim was to explore the ambulance service as experienced by present and former employees.
Over the last decade, the number of ambulance assignments has increased annually by about 10%, and as many as 50% of all ambulance assignments are considered non-urgent. This raises questions about which assignments the Ambulance Service (AS) is supposed to deal with.
Data were collected from three focus group interviews with a total of 18 present and former employees of the Swedish AS. An inductive qualitative analysis method developed by Krueger was chosen.
Five themes emerged in the analysis: "Poor guidance for practice", "An unclear assignment", "Being a gate keeper", "From saving lives to self-care" and "Working in no man's land", which together constitute the AS.
Present and former employees of the AS in Sweden describe their mission as unclear and recognize the lack of consensus and a clearly developed mission statement. Furthermore, expectations and training mainly focus on emergency response, which is contrary to the reality of the ambulance clinicians' everyday work.
PubMed ID
28712766 View in PubMed
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Accelerated perioperative care and rehabilitation intervention for hip and knee replacement is effective: a randomized clinical trial involving 87 patients with 3 months of follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86594
Source
Acta Orthop. 2008 Apr;79(2):149-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Larsen Kristian
Sørensen Ole Gade
Hansen Torben B
Thomsen Per B
Søballe Kjeld
Author Affiliation
The Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Department of Orthopedics, Holstebro Regional Hospital, Holstebro, Denmark. fekl2004@msn.com
Source
Acta Orthop. 2008 Apr;79(2):149-59
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - rehabilitation
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - adverse effects - rehabilitation
Early Ambulation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - diagnosis - surgery
Osteoarthritis, Knee - diagnosis - surgery
Patient Readmission
Perioperative Care - methods
Quality of Life
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Approximately 12,000 hip and knee replacements were performed in Denmark in 2005. Accelerated perioperative interventions are currently implemented, but there is conflicting evidence regarding the effect. We therefore performed an efficacy study of an accelerated perioperative care and rehabilitation intervention in patients receiving primary total hip replacement, and both total and unicompartmental knee replacement. METHODS: A randomized clinical trial was undertaken in which 87 patients were randomized to either a control group receiving the current perioperative procedure, or an intervention group receiving a new accelerated perioperative care and rehabilitation procedure. Outcome measures were length of stay (LOS) in hospital, and gain in quality of life (QOL) using EQ-5D from baseline to 3-month follow-up. RESULTS: Mean LOS was reduced (p
PubMed ID
18478482 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated recovery program after hip fracture surgery]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61643
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Dec 30;165(1):29-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-30-2002
Author
Sten Rasmussen
Billy B Kristensen
Susanne Foldager
Lis Myhrmann
Henrik Kehlet
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling, Vejle Sygehus, DK-7300 Vejle. sten.rasmussen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Dec 30;165(1):29-33
Date
Dec-30-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - methods - rehabilitation
Comparative Study
Denmark
Early Ambulation - methods
English Abstract
Female
Hip Fractures - rehabilitation - surgery
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Care - methods
Preoperative Care - methods
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: A multimodal approach to minimise the effect of the surgical stress response can reduce complications and hospital stay after abdominal surgery and hip arthroplasty. The aim of the study was to assess the results of a well-defined rehabilitation programme after hip fracture. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In an open intervention study, we entered 200 consecutive patients with hip fracture allowing full weight-bearing after operative treatment. The effect of a revised, optimised perioperative care programme with continuous epidural analgesia, early oral nutrition, oxygen supplementation, restricted volume and transfusion therapy, and intensive physiotherapy and mobilisation was assessed (n = 100) and compared with the conventional perioperative treatment programme before the intervention (n = 100). The median age was 82 (56-96) years in the control group and 82 (63-101) years in the accelerated multimodal perioperative treatment group. RESULTS: The median hospital stay was reduced from 21 (range 1-162, mean 32) to 11 (range 1-100, mean 17) days. The total use of days in hospital was reduced from 3211 to 1667. There were fewer complications, whereas the need for home care after discharge was unchanged. CONCLUSION: An accelerated clinical pathway with focus on pain relief, oral nutrition, and rehabilitation may reduce hospital stay and improve recovery after hip fracture.
PubMed ID
12529945 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated versus conventional hospital stay in total hip and knee arthroplasty III: patient satisfaction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81877
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 29;168(22):2148-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-29-2006
Author
Husted Henrik
Hansen Hans Christian
Holm Gitte
Bach-Dal Charlotte
Rud Kirsten
Andersen Kristoffer Lande
Kehlet Henrik
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, Ortopaedkirurgisk Afdeling, Hvidovre. henrikhusted@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 29;168(22):2148-51
Date
May-29-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Denmark
Early Ambulation
Female
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Registries
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The goal of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction with the hospital stay in relation to the length of stay for patients operated on with primary total hip- and knee-arthroplasty (THA and TKA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: According to the National Register on Patients, the three departments with the shortest and the three departments with the longest postoperative hospital stay at the end of 2003 were chosen for evaluation. The patients, operated on with THA or TKA from September 2004 to April 2005, from the selected departments answered a questionnaire regarding satisfaction with elected parts of their stay, co-morbidity, sex and age. RESULTS: The patients from the departments with the shortest stay were not younger nor had they less co-morbidities than patients from departments with longer stays. Apart from staying a significantly shorter time, they were either as satisfied--or sometimes more satisfied--with all parts of their stay compared to patients from the departments with longer hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Patients in accelerated stays are not less satisfied with their hospital stay (or any part of it) compared to patients with longer and more conventional hospital stays. These results support the implementation of fast-track total hip- and knee arthroplasty.
PubMed ID
16768952 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated versus conventional hospital stay in total hip and knee arthroplasty II: organizational and clinical differences].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168857
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 29;168(22):2144-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-29-2006
Author
Henrik Husted
Hans Christian Hansen
Gitte Holm
Charlotte Bach-Dal
Kirsten Rud
Kristoffer Lande Andersen
Henrik Kehlet
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, Ortopaedkirurgisk Afdeling, Hvidovre. henrikhusted@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 29;168(22):2144-8
Date
May-29-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - nursing - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - nursing - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Early Ambulation - statistics & numerical data
Focus Groups
Hospital Departments - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Length of Stay
Orthopedics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns
Registries
Abstract
The goal of this study was to evaluate hospital stays for patients operated on with primary total hip- and knee-arthroplasty (THA and TKA) in order to identify important logistical and clinical areas for the duration of the hospital stay.
According to the National Register on Patients, the three departments with the shortest and the three departments with the longest postoperative hospital stay at the end of 2003 were chosen for evaluation. This took place from late 2004 to mid 2005, and all written material and 25 journals from each department were evaluated, and interviews with the heads of the departments as well as the staff were conducted. The logistical set-up and the clinical treatment/pathway were examined in an attempt to identify logistical and clinical factors acting as improvements or barriers for quick rehabilitation and subsequent discharge.
Departments with short hospital stay were characterised by both logistical (homogenous entities, regular staff, high continuity, using more time on and up-to-date information including expectations of a short stay, functional discharge criteria) and clinical features (multi-modal pain treatment, early mobilization and discharge when criteria were met) facilitating quick rehabilitation and discharge.
Implementation of logistical and clinical features, as shown in this study in all departments, are expected to increase rehabilitation and reduce the length of hospital stay.
PubMed ID
16768951 View in PubMed
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Accessibility and distribution of the Norwegian National Air Emergency Service: 1988-1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190330
Source
Air Med J. 2002 May-Jun;21(3):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Torhild Heggestad
Knut Yngve Børsheim
Author Affiliation
SINTEF Unimed Health Services Research, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Air Med J. 2002 May-Jun;21(3):39-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Ambulances - supply & distribution - utilization
Emergency Medical Services - supply & distribution - utilization
Geography
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Multivariate Analysis
National Health Programs
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns
Regression Analysis
Safety Management
Time Factors
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
To evaluate the accessibility and distribution of the Norwegian National Air Emergency Service in the 10-year period from 1988 to 1998.
The primary material was annual standardized activity data that included all helicopter missions. A multivariate model of determinants for use of the helicopter service was computed by linear regression. Accessibility was measured as the percentage of the population reached in different flying times, and we evaluated the service using a simulation of alternative locations for the helicopter bases.
The helicopter service (HEMS) has short access times, with a mean reaction time of 8 minutes and a mean response time of 26 minutes for acute missions. Nearly all patients (98%) are reached within 1 hour. A simulation that tested alternative locations of the helicopter bases compared with current locations showed no increase in accessibility. The use of the service shows large regional differences. Multivariate analyses showed that the distances of the patients from the nearest helicopter base and the nearest hospital are significant determinants for the use of HEMS.
Establishment of a national service has given the Norwegian population better access to highly qualified prehospital emergency services. Furthermore, the HEMS has a compensating effect in adjusting for differences in traveling distances to a hospital. Safety, cost-containment, and gatekeeper functions remain challenges.
PubMed ID
11994734 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute myocardial infarction: does pre-hospital treatment increase survival?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52222
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2002 Sep;9(3):210-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
J. Koefoed-Nielsen
E F Christensen
H. Melchiorsen
A. Foldspang
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesiology, University Hospital of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2002 Sep;9(3):210-6
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulances
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Urban Population
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a mobile emergency care unit (MECU) staffed with an anaesthetist, in terms of increased survival among patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI). The setting was an urban area with 330 000 inhabitants. This was a quasi-experimental before-and-after-study including consecutive emergency calls during September to November 1996 (Period 1, without the MECU) and September to November 1997 (Period 2, including the MECU). Fifty-four ambulance patients had their MI diagnosis confirmed at hospital during Period 1, and another 54 in Period 2. The 28-day mortality was collected from relevant registers. Twenty-four (44%) of Period 2 patients were transported by the MECU. MECU patients had lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) than other patients, both before and after hospital admission. Nitroglycerine treatment was relatively frequent in MECU patients, and cardioversion, anaesthesia and intubation was applied exclusively in these patients. After arrival at hospital, MECU patients had thrombolysis relatively often (46% versus 23% in other Period 2 patients) but percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) relatively infrequently (21% vs 30%). The total mortality was significantly lower in Period 2 than in Period 1 patients (11% vs 21%,
PubMed ID
12394616 View in PubMed
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[Acute myocardial infarction in Mid-Norway: transportation for thrombolytic treatment or primary percutaneous coronary intervention?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140877
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Sep 9;130(17):1714-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-9-2010
Author
Hanne Saettem Beltesbrekke
Mari Bergan Husa
Harald Vik-Mo
Author Affiliation
Institutt for sirkulasjon og bildediagnostikk, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet og Hjertemedisinsk avdeling, St. Olavs hospital, 7006 Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Sep 9;130(17):1714-6
Date
Sep-9-2010
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Ambulances
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - therapy
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prognosis
Thrombolytic Therapy
Time Factors
Transportation of Patients
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Occluded coronary arteries should be opened urgently in patients who have acute myocardial infarction and ST-elevation in ECG. When transport times are long, thrombolytic treatment is a good alternative to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The purpose of this study was to assess choice of treatment strategy in cases where time after start of symptoms and transport time are decisive for the outcome.
A cohort study of 379 patients, who had myocardial infarction and ST-elevation, and were admitted to St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim, Norway in the period 1.11.2007-31.1.2009.
268 patients (71 %) were treated with PCI, and 111 patients (29 %) with thrombolytic treatment. 173 patients (46 %) were transported by helicopter. The counties in Mid-Norway used markedly different treatment strategies for these patients.
Great regional differences were observed in the use of PCI and thrombolytic treatment in Mid-Norway.
PubMed ID
20835281 View in PubMed
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[Acute need of registration of ambulance crash-related injuries]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82645
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Feb 8-14;103(6):372-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lundälv Jörgen
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för socialt arbete, Göteborgs universitet. jorgen.lundalv@socwork.gu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Feb 8-14;103(6):372-4
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Ambulances - standards
Automobile Driving - standards
Humans
Police
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
PubMed ID
16536041 View in PubMed
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736 records – page 1 of 74.