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Knowledge about Alzheimer's disease among Norwegian psychologists: the Alzheimer's disease knowledge scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129214
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2012;16(4):521-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Inger Hilde Nordhus
Børge Sivertsen
Ståle Pallesen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2012;16(4):521-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Adult
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Clinical Competence
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychology - standards
Risk factors
Abstract
Professional knowledge about Alzheimer's disease (AD) is essential in order to provide appropriate care for those suffering from this progressive and fatal condition. The optimizing of service provision to these patients and their families should also involve mental health professionals including clinical psychologists. In the present study, members of the Norwegian Psychological Association working in clinical practice were invited to participate in a web-based survey measuring knowledge about AD and related disorders. Questions regarding age, gender, accreditation as clinical specialist, age group of typical patients, and experience with patients suffering from dementia were asked in addition to the administration of the Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS). ADKS consists of 30 true/false items covering risk factors, assessment and diagnosis, symptoms, course, life impact, care giving, and treatment and management. A total of 956 clinical psychologists participated, yielding a response rate of 50.9%. The average mean performance score on the ADKS was 24.10 (SD = 2.5, range 15-30). Kuder-Richardson coefficient of reliability on the ADKS was 0.98. Multiple regression analysis showed that being indirectly exposed to dementia in older family members through their own patients, together with a self-reported knowledge of one's performance on the ADKS, significantly explained high scores on the ADKS. With reservations based on study limitations, it is concluded that the knowledge of AD in Norwegian clinical psychologists is fairly good. An obvious challenge is how to strengthen this knowledge both in our professional training programs in psychology as well as among those working in applied clinical settings.
PubMed ID
22129312 View in PubMed
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Twenty-year changes in dementia occurrence suggest decreasing incidence in central Stockholm, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114652
Source
Neurology. 2013 May 14;80(20):1888-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-14-2013
Author
Chengxuan Qiu
Eva von Strauss
Lars Bäckman
Bengt Winblad
Laura Fratiglioni
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet-Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. chengxuan.qiu@ki.se
Source
Neurology. 2013 May 14;80(20):1888-94
Date
May-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To explore whether prevalence, survival, and incidence of dementia have changed from 1987-1994 to 2001-2008 in Stockholm, Sweden.
This study is based on 2 cross-sectional surveys of people aged 75 years or over conducted in central Stockholm: the Kungsholmen Project (KP) (1987-1989, n = 1,700) and the Swedish National study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (SNAC-K) (2001-2004, n = 1,575). In both surveys we diagnosed dementia according to DSM-III-R criteria, following the identical diagnostic procedure. Death certificates were used to determine survival status of KP participants as of December 1994 and SNAC-K participants as of June 2008. We used logistic and Cox models to compare prevalence and survival, controlling for major confounders. We inferred incidence of dementia according to its relationship with prevalence and survival.
At baseline, 225 subjects in KP and 298 in SNAC-K were diagnosed with dementia. The age- and sex-standardized prevalence of dementia was 17.5% (12.8% in men; 19.2% in women) in KP and 17.9% (10.8% in men; 20.5% in women) in SNAC-K. The adjusted odds ratio of dementia in SNAC-K vs KP was 1.17 (95% confidence interval 0.95-1.46). The multiadjusted hazard ratio of death in SNAC-K vs KP was 0.71 (0.57-0.88) in subjects with dementia, 0.68 (0.59-0.79) in those without dementia, and 0.66 (0.59-0.74) in all participants.
Prevalence of dementia was stable from the late 1980s to the early 2000s in central Stockholm, Sweden, whereas survival of patients with dementia increased. These results suggest that incidence of dementia may have decreased during this period.
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2013 May 14;80(20):1824-523596078
PubMed ID
23596063 View in PubMed
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Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1993;5(1):5-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
H C Hendrie
K S Hall
N. Pillay
D. Rodgers
C. Prince
J. Norton
H. Brittain
A. Nath
A. Blue
J. Kaufert
Author Affiliation
Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Indianapolis 46202-5110.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1993;5(1):5-14
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Abstract
A community survey and subsequent clinical assessment of 192 Cree aged 65 years and over registered in two Reserves in Northern Manitoba identified only one case of probable Alzheimer's disease among eight cases of dementia, giving a prevalence of 0.5% for Alzheimer's disease and 4.2% for all dementias. This contrasted with an age-adjusted prevalence of 3.5% for Alzheimer's disease and 4.2% for all dementias in an age-stratified sample of 241 English-speaking residents of Winnipeg. Although it was not so for all dementias, the difference between the groups for prevalence of Alzheimer's disease was highly significant (p
PubMed ID
8499574 View in PubMed
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Incidence of dementia in the Lundby Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224637
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1992;11 Suppl 1:61-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
O. Hagnell
L. Ojesjö
B. Rorsman
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Forensic Psychiatry, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1992;11 Suppl 1:61-6
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia, Multi-Infarct - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidences of senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) and multi-infarction dementia (MID) were studied in a total Swedish population, the Lundby project. The study is prospective and covers a 25-year period. The incidence rates per year of contracting SDAT or MID and the probability in each 10-year age interval of contracting dementia in the elderly were calculated, as well as the cumulative risk up to a certain age. The lifetime risk of contracting SDAT was for men 25.5% and for women 31.9%. The corresponding figures for MID were 29.8 and 25.1%.
PubMed ID
1603251 View in PubMed
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Age, adaptive behavior, and Alzheimer disease in Down syndrome: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217485
Source
Am J Ment Retard. 1994 Sep;99(2):151-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
D E Rasmussen
D. Sobsey
Author Affiliation
Alberta Family and Social Services, Red Deer, Alberta.
Source
Am J Ment Retard. 1994 Sep;99(2):151-65
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification - psychology
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Down Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Institutionalization
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Abstract
Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were used to compare age-related changes in adaptive functioning in institutionalized adults with and without Down syndrome. Cross-sectional analysis showed significant differences related to level of functioning but not to age or etiology of disability. Longitudinal analysis showed a pattern of decline in self-help and communication skills in several individuals with Down syndrome older than 40. The case of an adult with Down syndrome with confirmed Alzheimer pathology at postmortem was presented. Results were discussed in relation to aging and the likelihood of Alzheimer-like changes in individuals with Down syndrome.
PubMed ID
7803032 View in PubMed
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Senile dementia of the Alzheimer type in the Lundby Study. I. A prospective, epidemiological study of incidence and risk during the 15 years 1957-1972.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227569
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1991;241(3):159-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
O. Hagnell
A. Franck
A. Gräsbeck
R. Ohman
L. Ojesjö
L. Otterbeck
B. Rorsman
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Forensic Psychiatry, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1991;241(3):159-64
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In spite of the great impact of senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) on society, far too little is known about its epidemiology. In this study of a total, normal population from a geographically delimited area in Sweden, Lundby, 2612 persons were examined in 1957 by one psychiatrist (Hagnell). In 1972 the same population was reexamined irrespective of domicile. The incidence and risk of contracting SDAT during the 15 years were calculated. No cases of SDAT were diagnosed before the age of 60 years. The lifetime risk was for men 25.7% and for women 26.2%. When only the very severely impaired were taken into account, the figures were 14.5% in men and 14.6% in women.
PubMed ID
1790161 View in PubMed
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The occurrence of depressive symptoms in the preclinical phase of AD: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46218
Source
Neurology. 1999 Dec 10;53(9):1998-2002
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1999
Author
A K Berger
L. Fratiglioni
Y. Forsell
B. Winblad
L. Bäckman
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Gerontology Research Center and Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Occupational Therapy, and Elderly Care Research, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Neurology. 1999 Dec 10;53(9):1998-2002
Date
Dec-10-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Amnesia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Motivation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sick Role
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine preclinical depressive symptoms 3 years before the diagnosis of AD. METHODS: The authors compared incident AD patients and nondemented individuals in terms of baseline mood- and motivation-related symptoms of depression, and assessed whether depressive symptoms in preclinical AD are related to self-perceived memory problems. Participants came from a population-based longitudinal study on aging and dementia in Stockholm, Sweden. The sample consisted of 222 persons older than 74 years who were followed for a 3-year interval. Thirty-four individuals had developed AD at follow-up, whereas 188 remained nondemented. Dementia diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd edition, revised. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale. RESULTS: The incident AD patients had more depressive symptoms than the nondemented persons at baseline. There was a dominance of motivation-related symptoms of depression (e.g., lack of interest, loss of energy, concentration difficulties) in preclinical AD. This association remained when adjusting for subjective memory complaints. CONCLUSIONS: Depressive symptoms are elevated preclinically in AD, and this elevation is not merely a by-product of self-perceived cognitive difficulties. Thus, depressive symptoms may be part of the preclinical phase in AD.
PubMed ID
10599771 View in PubMed
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Occurrence of dementia in advanced age: the study design of the Kungsholmen Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224638
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1992;11 Suppl 1:29-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
L. Fratiglioni
M. Viitanen
L. Bäckman
P O Sandman
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Sweden.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1992;11 Suppl 1:29-36
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Dementia, Vascular - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Neuropsychological Tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The Kungsholmen Project is a study on elderly people living in a parish of Stockholm, Sweden. The study uses a longitudinal approach with the principal purpose of determining the natural history of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. The study population consists of all 2,368 inhabitants of the Kungsholmen area in Stockholm, aged 75 years and above in October, 1987. The study design consists of three phases. Phase I consists of a screening test used in order to identify the 'possible' dementia cases; phase II is a complete clinical examination carried out in order to reach a final diagnosis of dementia; in phase III the whole population is reexamined in order to ascertain new cases of dementia. DSM-IIIR criteria for dementia and different types of dementia are used. The final diagnosis is based on a consensus using two preliminary diagnoses, made separately by different physicians.
PubMed ID
1603245 View in PubMed
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Factors predicting the relapse of depression in old age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46210
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;15(2):112-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
S L Kivelä
P. Viramo
K. Pahkala
Author Affiliation
University of Oulu, Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, Oulu, Finland. slk@cc.oulu.fi
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;15(2):112-9
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sick Role
Stress, Psychological - complications
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Studies in mixed-aged populations show differences between the predictors of a relapse and those of a long-term course of depression, supporting the hypothesis about similar differences among the aged. AIM: The aim was to identify the factors predicting or related to a relapse of depression among the Finnish elderly having recovered from depression during treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The population consisted of 70 depressed (DSM-III criteria) elderly (60 yr-) Finns having recovered from depression during treatment as determined 15 months after baseline. By the 4-year follow-up after the recovery, 20 patients had relapsed and 50 persons were non-depressed. RESULTS: The logistic regression model showed major depression and psychomotor retardation to be independent predictors. Relapses were not related to stressors in life or physical illnesses occurring during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Major depressive elderly patients have a high risk for relapses without the occurrence of the stressors or physical illnesses. In clinical practice, major depressive elderly patients should be followed up in order to detect and treat potential relapses as early as possible. Cooperation between psychiatrists and general practitioners is needed in the follow-up. Theoretically, the results suggest the assumption of a biochemical aetiology of major depression.
PubMed ID
10679842 View in PubMed
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Frequency and subgroups of neuropsychiatric symptoms in mild cognitive impairment and different stages of dementia in Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296118
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 01; 30(1):103-113
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
N Siafarikas
G Selbaek
T Fladby
J Ĺ altyte Benth
E Auning
D Aarsland
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry,Akershus University Hospital,Lørenskog,Norway.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 01; 30(1):103-113
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cognitive Dysfunction - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), such as depression, apathy, agitation, and psychotic symptoms are common in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Subgroups of NPS have been reported. Yet the relationship of NPS and their subgroups to different stages of cognitive impairment is unclear. Most previous studies are based on small sample sizes and show conflicting results. We sought to examine the frequency of NPS and their subgroups in MCI and different stages of dementia in AD.
This was a cross-sectional study using data from a Norwegian national registry of memory clinics. From a total sample of 4,571 patients, we included those with MCI or AD (MCI 817, mild AD 883, moderate-severe AD 441). To compare variables across groups ANOVA or ? 2-test was applied. We used factor analysis of Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire (NPI-Q) items to identify subgroups of NPS.
The frequency of any NPS was 87.2% (AD 91.2%, MCI 79.5%; p
PubMed ID
28927477 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.