Skip header and navigation

Refine By

70 records – page 1 of 7.

Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and risk of stroke and death in people with dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302548
Source
Alzheimers Dement. 2018 07; 14(7):944-951
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Edwin C K Tan
Kristina Johnell
Sara Garcia-Ptacek
Miriam L Haaksma
Johan Fastbom
J Simon Bell
Maria Eriksdotter
Author Affiliation
Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Australia; Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: edwin.tan.@monash.edu.
Source
Alzheimers Dement. 2018 07; 14(7):944-951
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications
Cause of Death
Cholinesterase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Registries
Risk
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the association between acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) use and risk of ischemic stroke and death in people with dementia.
A cohort study of 44,288 people with dementia registered in the Swedish Dementia Registry from 2007 to 2014. Propensity score-matched competing risk regression models were used to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between time-dependent AChEI use and risk of stroke and death.
Compared with matched controls, AChEI users had a lower risk of stroke (hazard ratio: 0.85, 95% confidence interval: 0.75-0.95) and all-cause death (hazard ratio: 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.72-0.80). After considering competing risk of death, high doses (=1.33 defined daily doses) of AChEI remained significantly associated with reduced stroke risk.
The use of AChEIs in people with dementia may be associated with reduced risk of ischemic stroke and death. These results call for a closer examination of the cardiovascular effects of AChEIs.
PubMed ID
29706487 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alzheimer changes are common in aged drivers killed in single car crashes and at intersections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203624
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 1998 Sep 28;96(2-3):115-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-1998
Author
M. Viitanen
K. Johansson
N. Bogdanovic
A. Berkowicz
H. Druid
A. Eriksson
P. Krantz
H. Laaksonen
H. Sandler
P. Saukko
I. Thiblin
B. Winblad
H. Kalimo
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 1998 Sep 28;96(2-3):115-27
Date
Sep-28-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - classification - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications - pathology
Brain - pathology
Female
Finland
Forensic Medicine - methods
Humans
Male
Plaque, Amyloid - pathology
Sweden
Abstract
With increasing age, diseases affecting the cognitive functions are more frequent. These diseases may increase the risk for fatal car crashes. We analyzed the frequency of neuropathological alterations characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (i.e. neuritic and diffuse plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles) in two association areas of the brain, parietal and frontal cerebral cortex, from 98 fatally injured aged drivers. In the age groups of 65-75 and over 75 years of age, 50% and 72% of the drivers, respectively, had neuritic plaques in either parietal and/or frontal cortex. In 14% of all killed drivers the number of neuritic plaques reached the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) age-related histologic score C, which indicates the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and an additional 33% had score B, which suggests the diagnosis of AD. Neuropathological AD changes were most common in the brains of drivers killed in single vehicle crashes, followed by multivehicle crashes at intersections and least common in multivehicle crashes elsewhere, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. In a great majority (80-85%) of cases the killed aged driver was the guilty party of the crash. The results imply, that incipient AD may contribute to fatal crashes of aged drivers, and therefore the forensic autopsy of these victims should include neuropathological examination.
PubMed ID
9854829 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alzheimer disease-like clinical phenotype in a family with FTDP-17 caused by a MAPT R406W mutation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86943
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2008 Apr;15(4):377-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Lindquist S G
Holm I E
Schwartz M.
Law I.
Stokholm J.
Batbayli M.
Waldemar G.
Nielsen J E
Author Affiliation
Memory Disorders Research Group, The Neuroscience Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. granhojlindquist@gmail.com
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2008 Apr;15(4):377-85
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - complications - genetics - pathology - radionuclide imaging
Amyloid beta-Protein - metabolism
Arginine - genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17
Dementia - complications
Denmark
Deoxyglucose - metabolism
Family Health
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Neurofibrillary Tangles - metabolism
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Peptide Fragments - metabolism
Phenotype
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Tryptophan - genetics
tau Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
We report clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological features of a Danish family with autosomal dominant inherited dementia, a clinical phenotype resembling Alzheimer's disease and a pathogenic mutation (R406W) in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. Pre-symptomatic and affected family members underwent multidisciplinary (clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological) examinations. Treatment with memantine in a family member with early symptoms, based on the clinical phenotype and the lack of specific treatment, appears to stabilize the disease course and increase the glucose metabolism in cortical and subcortical areas, as determined by serial [F(18)]FDG-PET scanning before and after initiation of treatment. Neuropathological examination of a second affected and mutation-positive family member showed moderate atrophy of the temporal lobes including the hippocampi. Microscopy revealed abundant numbers of tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles in all cortical areas and in some brainstem nuclei corresponding to a diagnosis of frontotemporal lobe degeneration on the basis of a MAPT mutation. The clinical and genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant inherited dementia must be taken into account in the genetic counselling and genetic testing of families with autosomal dominantly inherited dementia in general.
PubMed ID
18284428 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alzheimer's disease. Physician-patient communication.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218088
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1160-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
J B Orange
D W Molloy
J A Lever
P. Darzins
C R Ganesan
Author Affiliation
Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Western Ontario, London.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1160-8
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada - epidemiology
Communication Disorders - etiology - psychology
Diagnosis, Differential
Forecasting
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Kinesics
Language
Memory Disorders - etiology - psychology
Physician-Patient Relations
Research - trends
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The number of cognitively impaired elderly in Canada has increased greatly during the past two decades; nearly all have Alzheimer's disease (AD). The memory problems and changes in language and communication of these patients place tremendous strain on physicians who are searching for a differential diagnosis and are trying to communicate with them. Reviewing the salient language and communication features of AD patients leads to strategies for improving effective physician-patient communication.
Notes
Cites: Arch Neurol. 1988 Jul;45(7):760-33390031
Cites: Brain Lang. 1986 Nov;29(2):315-233790984
Cites: Brain Lang. 1987 Jul;31(2):187-2003620899
Cites: J Speech Hear Res. 1987 Sep;30(3):343-503669641
Cites: JAMA. 1982 Jul 16;248(3):333-57087127
Cites: Neuropsychologia. 1984;22(1):23-306709173
Cites: Neurology. 1985 Mar;35(3):394-73974897
Cites: J Speech Hear Res. 1985 Sep;28(3):405-104046581
Cites: Brain Lang. 1986 Jul;28(2):235-493730816
Cites: J Speech Hear Disord. 1988 Feb;53(1):8-153339870
Cites: J Geriatr Psychiatry. 1988;21(1):73-883171111
Cites: Gerontologist. 1988 Dec;28(6):797-93253149
Cites: Psychol Aging. 1986 Sep;1(3):261-93267407
Cites: J Appl Behav Anal. 1990 Spring;23(1):29-422139873
Cites: Brain Lang. 1991 Apr;40(3):330-432054590
Cites: J Speech Hear Res. 1991 Aug;34(4):831-441956191
Cites: Appl Nurs Res. 1991 May;4(2):77-841835831
Cites: BMJ. 1991 Nov 30;303(6814):1385-71760608
Cites: Allergy. 1991 Nov;46(8):582-71789399
Cites: Brain Lang. 1992 Jan;42(1):77-881547470
Cites: J Speech Hear Res. 1992 Dec;35(6):1344-571494276
PubMed ID
8019193 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Alzheimer's disease - the most common cause of dementia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306621
Source
Lakartidningen. 2020 03 09; 117:
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
03-09-2020
Author
Nenad Bogdanovic
Oskar Hansson
Henrik Zetterberg
Hans Basun
Martin Ingelsson
Lars Lannfelt
Kaj Blennow
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Tema Åldrande Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Tema Åldrande Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2020 03 09; 117:
Date
03-09-2020
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alzheimer Disease - complications - genetics
Amyloid beta-Peptides
Biomarkers
Dementia - etiology
Humans
Quality of Life
Sweden
tau Proteins
Abstract
Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia. As many as 250,000 people in Sweden will have a dementia disease in 2050. The »amyloid cascade hypothesis« is a common model which explains how ß-amyloid affects the function of the nerve cells. Alzheimer's disease has a long-lasting course and can present in typical and atypical forms. CSF analyses for »core AD CSF biomarkers« and synaptic proteins have been available for clinical diagnostics. PET scanning can detect either ß-amyloid or tau aggregates in the brain of living humans. Current Alzheimer's disease therapy is based on two classes of cognition-enhancing drugs: acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and NMDA-receptor antagonist, which delays cognitive decline in most patients. The latest clinical development of potential therapy for Alzheimer's is active or passive immunotherapy against brain ß-amyloid and tau, where several studies have shown varying but promising treatment effects. Non-pharmacological interventions in patients with AD aim to delay the loss of mental abilities, helping people to be independent in everyday life for as long as possible, and to increase their well-being and quality of life.
PubMed ID
32154904 View in PubMed
Less detail

Amyloid and tau proteins in cortical brain biopsy and Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139810
Source
Ann Neurol. 2010 Oct;68(4):446-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Ville Leinonen
Anne M Koivisto
Sakari Savolainen
Jaana Rummukainen
Juuso N Tamminen
Tomi Tillgren
Sannakaisa Vainikka
Okko T Pyykkö
Juhani Mölsä
Mikael Fraunberg
Tuula Pirttilä
Juha E Jääskeläinen
Hilkka Soininen
Jaakko Rinne
Irina Alafuzoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. ville.leinonen@kuh.fi
Source
Ann Neurol. 2010 Oct;68(4):446-53
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications - pathology
Amyloid beta-Peptides - metabolism
Biopsy - methods
Cerebral Cortex - metabolism
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
tau Proteins - metabolism
Abstract
Amyloid-ß(Aß) aggregates are presumed to be found in the brain at an early stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) but have seldom been assessed by brain biopsy during life in often elderly patients.
Between 1991 and 2006 we evaluated 468 patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus with intraventricular pressure monitoring and a right frontal cortical biopsy sample immunostained for Aß and hyperphosphorylated tau (HPt). Adequate samples and the clinical follow-up data until death or the end of 2008, available in 433 cases, were reviewed for the clinical signs of dementia, including AD. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze whether Aß and/or HPt in the biopsy samples obtained during life predicted development of cognitive impairment, in particular, AD.
Of the 433 frontal cortical samples, 42 (10%) displayed both Aß and HPt, 144 (33%) Aß only, and 247 (57%) neither Aß nor HPt. In a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 94 patients (22%) developed clinical AD. The presence of both Aß and HPt was strongly associated (odds ratio [OR], 68.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 22.1-210) and Aß alone significantly associated (OR, 10.8; 95% CI, 4.9-23.8) with the clinical diagnosis of AD.
This is the largest follow-up study of patients assessed for the presence of Aß and HPt in frontal cortical brain biopsy samples. 1) The presence of Aß and HPt spoke strongly for the presence or later development of clinical AD; 2) Aß alone was suggestive of AD; and 3) the absence of Aß and HPt spoke against a later clinical diagnosis of AD.
PubMed ID
20976765 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressant use and risk of hip fractures among community-dwelling persons with and without Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292637
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2017 12; 32(12):e107-e115
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2017
Author
Sanna Torvinen-Kiiskinen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Heidi Taipale
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2017 12; 32(12):e107-e115
Date
12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
To study whether antidepressant use is associated with an increased risk of hip fracture among community-dwelling persons with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD), and to compare the risk according to duration of use and between antidepressant groups.
Retrospective cohort study, including 50,491 persons with AD (mean age 80) and 100,982 comparison persons without AD from Finnish register-based MEDALZ cohort. Antidepressant use was compared with nonuse with Cox proportional hazard models. Incident users were identified with a one year washout period from Prescription register data. Main outcome was hospitalization due to hip fracture.
During antidepressant use, the age-adjusted rate of hip fractures per 100 person-years was 3.01 (95% CI 2.75-3.34) among persons with and 2.28 (1.94-2.61) among persons without AD. Antidepressant use was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture among persons with and without AD (adjusted HR 1.61, 95% CI 1.45-1.80 and 2.71, 2.35-3.14, respectively) compared with nonuse. The risk was most prominent in the beginning of use and was elevated even up to 4 years. The risk was increased with all of the most frequently used antidepressants.
Antidepressant use is associated with an increased risk of hip fracture among older persons. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Notes
CommentIn: Evid Based Nurs. 2017 Jul;20(3):94 PMID 28601807
PubMed ID
28055139 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antipsychotic Use and Risk of Hospitalization or Death Due to Pneumonia in Persons With and Those Without Alzheimer Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282670
Source
Chest. 2016 Dec;150(6):1233-1241
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Piia Lavikainen
Reijo Sund
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Heidi Taipale
Source
Chest. 2016 Dec;150(6):1233-1241
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications - drug therapy
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects
Comorbidity
Cross-Over Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonia - mortality
Propensity Score
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The use of antipsychotic agents has been associated with increased pneumonia risk, but although people with dementia are particularly susceptible to pneumonia, only one small study has assessed the risk of pneumonia in relation to the use of antipsychotic agents among people with Alzheimer disease (AD).
We investigated whether the incident use of antipsychotic agents, or specific antipsychotic agents, are related to a higher risk of hospitalization or death due to pneumonia in the Medication and Alzheimer Disease (MEDALZ) cohort. The cohort includes all individuals with AD who received a clinically verified AD diagnosis in Finland in 2005 to 2011 (N = 60,584; incident pneumonia, n = 12,225). A matched comparison cohort without AD (N = 60,584; incident pneumonia, n = 6,195) was used to compare the magnitude of risk. Results were adjusted for a propensity score derived from comorbidities, concomitant medications, and sociodemographic characteristics. Sensitivity analyses with case-crossover design were conducted.
The use of antipsychotic agents was associated with a higher risk of pneumonia (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.01; 95% CI, 1.90-2.13) in the AD cohort and a somewhat higher risk in the non-AD cohort (adjusted HR, 3.43; 95% CI, 2.99-3.93). Similar results were observed with case-crossover analyses (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.75-2.34 in the AD cohort and OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.77-3.79 in the non-AD cohort). The three most commonly used antipsychotic agents (quetiapine, risperidone, haloperidol) had similar associations with pneumonia risk.
Regardless of applied study design, treatment duration, or the choice of drug, the use of antipsychotic agents was associated with a higher risk of pneumonia. With observational data, we cannot fully rule out a shared causality between pneumonia and the use of antipsychotic agents, but the risk to benefit balance should be considered when antipsychotic agents are prescribed.
PubMed ID
27298071 View in PubMed
Less detail

70 records – page 1 of 7.