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A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
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An "S-shaped" relationship between smoking duration and alveolar bone loss: generating a hypothesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67413
Source
J Periodontol. 2001 Sep;72(9):1164-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
A A Schuller
D. Holst
Author Affiliation
TNO, Prevention and Health, Division of Child Health, Leiden, The Netherlands. AA.Schuller@pg.tno.nl
Source
J Periodontol. 2001 Sep;72(9):1164-71
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A number of epidemiological studies have shown that smoking is a risk factor for periodontal disease. Little is known about the relationship between smoking duration and alveolar bone loss. The purpose of this research was to describe the prevalence of alveolar bone loss according to smoking status in Norway. A dose-response model for duration of tobacco smoking on alveolar bone loss was then developed and discussed. METHODS: The study population consisted of 812 individuals living in Norway aged 45 to 64 years old (248 current smokers, 245 former smokers and 319 non-smokers). Alveolar bone loss was measured on bite-wing radiographs. Simple descriptive statistics were used to describe the central tendency and variation in alveolar bone loss. Regression analyses were performed to study the relationship between smoking duration and alveolar bone loss. RESULTS: Mean alveolar bone loss varied between 1.51 mm and 2.64 mm depending on smoking status and age. Mean alveolar bone loss was lowest in non-smokers and highest in current smokers. Given identical smoking status, the mean alveolar bone loss increased with increasing age except for the 2 oldest age groups of current smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Our results generate the hypothesis that the relationship between smoking duration and alveolar bone loss was "S-shaped." Assuming that alveolar bone loss is irreversible after smoking cessation, it could be hypothesized that there is a threshold period for tobacco smoking after which the accumulated effect of smoking becomes clinically observable. After a certain number of years of smoking, the effect on alveolar bone loss seems to level out. To test this hypothesis, the relationship between smoking duration and alveolar bone loss should be studied in a prospective study design.
PubMed ID
11577947 View in PubMed
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Association between moderate to severe psoriasis and periodontitis in a Scandinavian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266915
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:139
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Rasa Skudutyte-Rysstad
Ellen Margrethe Slevolden
Bjørn Frode Hansen
Leiv Sandvik
Hans Ragnar Preus
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:139
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Periodontal Attachment Loss - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Periodontitis - epidemiology
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage
Prevalence
Psoriasis - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to compare the prevalence of periodontitis and alveolar bone loss among individuals with psoriasis and a group of randomly selected controls.
Fifty individuals with psoriasis and 121 controls completed a structured questionnaire, and were examined clinically and radiographically. Oral examination included numbers of missing teeth, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), presence of dental plaque and bleeding on probing, as well as alveolar bone loss from radiographs. Questionnaires requested information on age, gender, education, dental care, smoking habits, general diseases and medicament use. For adjustment for baseline differences between psoriasis individuals and controls the propensity score based on gender, age and education was computed using multivariate logistic regression. A subsample analysis for propensity score matched psoriasis individuals (n?=?50) and controls (n?=?50) was performed.
When compared with controls, psoriasis individuals had significantly more missing teeth and more sites with plaque and bleeding on probing. The prevalence of moderate and severe periodontitis was significantly higher among psoriasis individuals (24%) compared to healthy controls (10%). Similarly, 36% of psoriasis cases had one or more sites with radiographic bone loss =3 mm, compared to 13% of controls. Logistic regression analysis showed that the association between moderate/severe periodontitis and psoriasis remained statistically significant when adjusted for propensity score, but was attenuated when smoking was entered into the model. The association between psoriasis and one or more sites with bone loss =3 mm remained statistically significant when adjusted for propensity score and smoking and regularity of dental visits. In the propensity score (age, gender and education) matched sample (n?=?100) psoriasis remained significantly associated with moderate/severe periodontitis and radiographic bone loss.
Within the limits of the present study, periodontitis and radiographic bone loss is more common among patients with moderate/severe psoriasis compared with the general population. This association remained significant after controlling for confounders.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25427764 View in PubMed
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Association between obesity and periodontal risk indicators in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141567
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Jun;6(2-2):e264-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Thomas Modéer
Cecilia Blomberg
Biniyam Wondimu
Tülay Yucel Lindberg
Claude Marcus
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. thomas.modeer@ki.se
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Jun;6(2-2):e264-70
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - analysis
Adolescent
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Plaque - epidemiology
Female
Gingival Crevicular Fluid - immunology
Gingivitis - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation Mediators - analysis
Interleukin-1beta - analysis
Interleukin-8 - analysis
Logistic Models
Male
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Periodontal Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 - analysis
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - analysis
Abstract
In a cross-sectional study design we test the hypothesis of whether obesity in adolescence is associated with periodontal risk indicators or disease.
Obese adolescents (n=52) and normal weight subjects (n=52) with a mean age of 14.5 years were clinically examined with respect to dental plaque, gingival inflammation, periodontal pockets and incipient alveolar bone loss. The subjects answered a questionnaire concerning medical conditions, oral hygiene habits, smoking habits and sociodemographic background. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and adjusted for age and gender (BMI-SDS). Samples of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were analyzed for the levels of adiponectin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), interleukin-1ß (IL-ß), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a).
Obese subjects exhibited more gingival inflammation (P4 mm) (P
PubMed ID
20707762 View in PubMed
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A cohort study of radiographic alveolar bone loss during adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218924
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1994 Feb;21(2):133-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
A M Aass
T. Tollefsen
P. Gjermo
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1994 Feb;21(2):133-8
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology - radiography
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Periodontitis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Radiography, Bitewing
Social Class
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to assess the changes in prevalence of early radiographic alveolar bone loss in a birth cohort (all subjects born 1970) over a period of 8 years as related to sex, ethnic origin, orthodontic treatment and socio-economic status. In 1984, the target population consisted of 2767 subjects. In 1986, 1988 and 1992, sets of bite-wing radiographs were obtained from samples of the same population. Alveolar bone loss was recorded if the distance from the cemento-enamel junction to the alveolar crest exceeded 2 mm measured on posterior bite-wing radiographs. The frequency of subjects with radiographic alveolar bone loss increased significantly with age (p
PubMed ID
8144733 View in PubMed
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Comparison of oral status in an adult population 35-75 year of age in the county of Dalarna, Sweden in 1983 and 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121805
Source
Swed Dent J. 2012;36(2):61-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Kristina Edman
Kerstin Ohrn
Anders Holmlund
Birgitta Nordström
Mans Hedin
Dan Hellberg
Author Affiliation
Centre for Oral Rehabilitation, Falun, Sweden. kristina.edman@ltdalarna.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2012;36(2):61-70
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Denture, Complete - statistics & numerical data
Denture, Partial, Removable - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Furcation Defects - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous - epidemiology
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - rehabilitation
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontitis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Diseases - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim was to study the prevalence and distribution of number of teeth, number of intact and decayed teeth and prevalence and distribution of removable dentures and periodontal disease over 25 years 1983-2008. Two cross-sectional studies (EpiWux) were performed in the County of Dalarna, Sweden in 1983 and 2008. In the 1983 study a random sample of 1012 individuals were invited to participate in this epidemiological and clinical study and 1440 individuals in 2008. A total number of 1695 individuals, stratified into geographical areas (rural and urban areas), in the age groups 35, 50, 65 and 75 answered a questionnaire and were also clinically and radiographically examined.The number of edentulous individuals decreased from 15% in 1983 to 3% in 2008. Number of teeth increased from 22.7 in 1983 to 24.2 in 2008 and decayed surfaces per tooth showed a three-time reduction over this period of time. As a consequence of better oral status the prevalence of complete removable dentures in both jaws decreased from 15% in 1983 to 2% in 2008. Individuals with moderate periodontitis decreased from 45% in 1983 to 16% in 2008.
Covering a period of 25 years the present study can report dramatic improvements in all aspects of dental status that were investigated.This is encouraging for dental care professionals, but will not necessarily lead to less demand for dental care in the future as the population is aging with a substantial increase in number of teeth.
PubMed ID
22876393 View in PubMed
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A cross-sectional study of the associations between periodontitis and carotid arterial calcifications in an elderly population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275270
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016;74(2):115-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Viveca Wallin Bengtsson
G Rutger Persson
Johan Berglund
Stefan Renvert
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016;74(2):115-20
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology
Calcinosis - epidemiology
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Periodontitis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Radiography, Panoramic
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Cervix - radiography
Abstract
To evaluate if the presence of periodontitis is associated with carotid arterial calcifications diagnosed on panoramic radiographs in an elderly population.
Study individuals were randomly selected from the Swedish civil registration database representing the aging population (60-96 years) in Karlskrona, Sweden. Bleeding on probing (BOP) and the deepest probing measurement at each tooth were registered. The proportions of teeth with a probing depth = 5 mm and the proportion of teeth with bleeding on probing were calculated. Analog panoramic radiographs were taken and the proportion of sites with a distance = 5 mm between the alveolar bone level and the cement-enamel junction (CEJ) were assessed. A diagnosis of periodontitis was declared if a distance between the alveolar bone level and the CEJ = 5 mm could be identified from the panoramic radiographs at > 10% of sites, probing depth of = 5 mm at one tooth or more and with BOP at > 20% of teeth.
Readable radiographs were obtained from 499 individuals. Carotid calcification was identified in 39.1%. Individuals were diagnosed with periodontitis in 18.4%. Data analysis demonstrated that individuals with periodontitis had a higher prevalence of carotid calcifications (Pearson ?(2) = 4.05 p
PubMed ID
26066062 View in PubMed
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A cross-sectional study on the prevalence of marginal bone loss among implant patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125669
Source
Clin Oral Implants Res. 2013 Jan;24(1):87-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Denis Cecchinato
Andrea Parpaiola
Jan Lindhe
Author Affiliation
Institute Franci, Padova, Italy. deniscecchinato@tiscali.it
Source
Clin Oral Implants Res. 2013 Jan;24(1):87-90
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology - radiography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Implants
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontal Index
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the present cross-sectional retrospective study was to determine bone loss in a sample of subjects restored with implant-supported prostheses and the prevalence and severity of peri-implantitis in a sub-sample.
A total of 139 patients who had attended a follow-up visit in 2007 were considered for inclusion. Subjects with implants that had been in function for less than 3?years or had poor quality radiographs were excluded. The final study population comprised 133 subjects with a total of 407 implants. Radiographic measurements identified subjects who had =1 implant site exhibiting marginal bone loss of >0.5?mm; 40 subjects met this criterion and were recalled for a clinical examination. Of the 40 subjects that were recalled for the clinical examination, 30 attended. The following parameters were recorded at mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual/palatal aspects of all implants: oral hygiene standard (plaque), bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth (PPD).
The mean interval between the baseline (1-year post-loading) and the follow-up radiographs was 4.8???2.3?years. In the total subject sample (133 subjects and 407 implants), the mean amount of marginal bone loss that had occurred was 0.2???1.2?mm. Ninety-three subjects with 246 implant sites exhibited no bone level alteration (group A), whereas 40 subjects with 161 implant sites (group B) displayed marginal bone loss of >0.5?mm at =1 implant (loser site). Sixty-eight implant sites in group B exhibited bone loss of >0.5?mm. However, only 20% of subjects and 11% of sites had lost >1?mm marginal bone, and 8% of subjects and 4% of sites had lost >2?mm bone. The total amount of bone loss that had occurred in group B was (i) 0.88???1.5?mm and (ii) among the loser sites 2.1???1.4?mm. Thirty subjects from group B were exposed to a clinical examination; out of 37 sites with bone loss >0.5?mm in this subgroup, 29 sites had a PPD value of =4?mm.
Marginal bone loss (>0.5?mm) at implants was observed in 30% of subjects and 16% of implant sites. More advanced loss of marginal bone occurred in much fewer subjects and sites. Sites with marginal bone loss was in the sub-sample characterized by bleeding on probing, but only occasionally with deep (=6?mm) pockets.
PubMed ID
22462406 View in PubMed
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Distribution of periodontal disease in a Swedish adult population 1973, 1983 and 1993.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204884
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1998 Jul;25(7):542-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
A. Hugoson
O. Norderyd
C. Slotte
H. Thorstensson
Author Affiliation
Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1998 Jul;25(7):542-8
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Furcation Defects - epidemiology
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Gingivitis - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - radiography
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Prevalence
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare changes in periodontal status in a Swedish population over a period of 20 years. Cross-sectional studies were carried out in Jönköping County in 1973, 1983, and 1993. Individuals were randomly selected from the following age groups: 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 years. A total of 600 individuals were examined in 1973, 597 in 1983, and 584 in 1993. The number of dentate individuals was 537 in 1973, 550 in 1983, and 552 in 1993. Based on clinical data and full mouth intra-oral radiographs, all individuals were classified into 5 groups according to the severity of the periodontal disease experience. Individuals were classified as having a healthy periodontium (group 1), gingivitis without signs of alveolar bone loss (group 2), moderate alveolar bone loss not exceeding 1/3 of the normal alveolar bone height (group 3), severe alveolar bone loss ranging between 1/3 and 2/3 of the normal alveolar bone height (group 4), or alveolar bone loss exceeding 2/3 of the normal bone height and angular bony defects and/or furcation defects (group 5). During these 20 years, the number of individuals in groups 1 and 2 increased from 49% in 1973 to 60% in 1993. In addition, there was a decrease in the number of individuals in group 3, the group with moderate periodontal bone loss. Groups 4 and 5 comprised 13% of the population and showed no change in general between 1983 and 1993. The individuals comprising these groups in 1993, however, had more teeth than those who comprised these groups in 1983; on the average, the individuals in disease group 4 had 4 more teeth and those in disease group 5, 2 more teeth per subject. In 1973, these 2 groups were considerably smaller, probably because of wider indications for tooth extractions and fewer possibilities for periodontal care which meant that many of these individuals had become edentulous and were not placed in a group. Individuals in groups 3, 4, and 5 were subdivided according to the number of surfaces (%) with gingivitis and periodontal pockets (> or =4 mm). In 1993, 20%, 42%. and 67% of the individuals in groups 3, 4, and 5 respectively were classified as diseased and in need of periodontal therapy with >20% bleeding sites and >10% sites with periodontal pockets > or =4 mm. In conclusion, an increase in the number of individuals with no marginal bone loss and a decrease in the number of individuals with moderate alveolar bone loss can be seen. The prevalence of individuals in the severe periodontal disease groups (4, 5) was unchanged during the last 10 years; however, the number of teeth per subject increased.
PubMed ID
9696253 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of Implant Therapy Analyzed in a Swedish Population: Prevalence of Peri-implantitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272203
Source
J Dent Res. 2016 Jan;95(1):43-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
J. Derks
D. Schaller
J. Håkansson
J L Wennström
C. Tomasi
T. Berglundh
Source
J Dent Res. 2016 Jan;95(1):43-9
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Crowns - statistics & numerical data
Dental Implants - statistics & numerical data
Dental Implants, Single-Tooth - statistics & numerical data
Dental Prosthesis Design - statistics & numerical data
Dental Prosthesis, Implant-Supported - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
General Practice, Dental - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mandible - surgery
Middle Aged
Peri-Implantitis - epidemiology
Periodontal Index
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Stomatitis - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease affecting soft and hard tissues surrounding dental implants. As the global number of individuals that undergo restorative therapy through dental implants increases, peri-implantitis is considered as a major and growing problem in dentistry. A randomly selected sample of 588 patients who all had received implant-supported therapy 9 y earlier was clinically and radiographically examined. Prevalence of peri-implantitis was assessed and risk indicators were identified by multilevel regression analysis. Forty-five percent of all patients presented with peri-implantitis (bleeding on probing/suppuration and bone loss >0.5 mm). Moderate/severe peri-implantitis (bleeding on probing/suppuration and bone loss >2 mm) was diagnosed in 14.5%. Patients with periodontitis and with =4 implants, as well as implants of certain brands and prosthetic therapy delivered by general practitioners, exhibited higher odds ratios for moderate/severe peri-implantitis. Similarly, higher odds ratios were identified for implants installed in the mandible and with crown restoration margins positioned =1.5 mm from the crestal bone at baseline. It is suggested that peri-implantitis is a common condition and that several patient- and implant-related factors influence the risk for moderate/severe peri-implantitis (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01825772).
Notes
Comment In: J Dent Res. 2016 Jan;95(1):7-826701918
PubMed ID
26701919 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.