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44 records – page 1 of 5.

Aetiological heterogeneity of Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198457
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 Apr;54(4):320
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Source
CMAJ. 1992 May 1;146(9):1534
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1992
Author
W F Forbes
L M Hayward
N. Agwani
Source
CMAJ. 1992 May 1;146(9):1534
Date
May-1-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - adverse effects
Alzheimer Disease - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Ontario - epidemiology
Water Pollution, Chemical - adverse effects
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1991 Dec 21-28;338(8782-8783):1592-31683989
Comment On: CMAJ. 1991 Oct 1;145(7):793-8041822096
PubMed ID
1637405 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 1995 Feb 15;152(4):467-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1995
Author
P. Levallois
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Feb 15;152(4):467-8
Date
Feb-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - adverse effects
Alzheimer Disease - chemically induced
Canada
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Water Supply - standards
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1991 Oct 1;145(7):793-8041822096
Cites: CMAJ. 1994 Jan 1;150(1):68-97903905
Comment On: CMAJ. 1994 Aug 1;151(3):268-718039073
Erratum In: Can Med Assoc J 1995 Jun 1;152(11):1751
PubMed ID
7859190 View in PubMed
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[Aspects of silicotuberculosis course in workers of highly aluminous mullite refractories].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194282
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2001;(3):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
B B Fishman
V A Medik
V R Veber
O V Bastsrykina
A A Prindik
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2001;(3):29-34
Date
2001
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aluminum - adverse effects
Aluminum Silicates - adverse effects
Chemical Industry
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Lung - radiography
Male
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Silicotuberculosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The article covers differential diagnostic features of pulmonary tuberculosis and pneumoconiosis in workers engaged into mullite refractories production. The authors suggest that the disease courses as a new form of lung disorder--mullitosis.
PubMed ID
11419323 View in PubMed
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The association of aluminum Alzheimer's disease, and neurofibrillary tangles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236038
Source
J Neural Transm Suppl. 1987;24:205-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
D P Perl
P F Good
Author Affiliation
Neuropathology Division, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York City, New York.
Source
J Neural Transm Suppl. 1987;24:205-11
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - adverse effects
Alzheimer Disease - chemically induced
Animals
Brain - drug effects
Humans
Motor Neurons - drug effects
Nerve Degeneration - drug effects
Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced
Neurofibrils - drug effects
Rabbits
Abstract
Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the development of large numbers of neurofibrillary tangles in certain neuronal populations. Aluminum salts inoculated into experimental animals produce neurofilamentous lesions which are similar, but not identical, to the neurofibrillary tangle of Alzheimer's disease. Although a few reports suggest evidence of increased amounts of aluminum in the brains of Alzheimer's disease victims, such bulk analysis studies have been difficult to replicate. Using scanning electron microscopy with x-ray spectrometry, we have identified accumulations of aluminum in neurofibrillary tangle-bearing neurons of Alzheimer's disease. Similar accumulations have been identified in the neurofibrillary tangle-bearing neurons found in the brains of indigenous natives of Guam who suffer from parkinsonism with dementia and from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This ongoing research still cannot ascribe a causal role of aluminum in the pathogenesis of the neurofibrillary tangle; however, it does suggest that environmental factors may play an important part in the formation of this abnormality.
PubMed ID
3316495 View in PubMed
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Bladder cancer screening among primary aluminum production workers in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228525
Source
J Occup Med. 1990 Sep;32(9):869-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1990
Author
G P Thériault
C G Tremblay
B G Armstrong
Author Affiliation
School of Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
J Occup Med. 1990 Sep;32(9):869-72
Date
Sep-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aluminum - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Quebec
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Tars - adverse effects
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Urine - cytology
Volatilization
Abstract
We evaluated a cytology screening program, offered by a large aluminum producer after the discovery of an excess of bladder cancer due to occupational exposure to coal-tar-pitch volatiles, in terms of early detection and survival, based on information in the public domain. From January 1970 through June 1986, 79 cases of bladder cancer were identified in this cohort of aluminum workers aged 65 years or younger. By the end of 1986, 36 had died, with bladder cancer as the primary cause of death for 53%. Cases diagnosed after the screening program was introduced in 1980 were compared with those diagnosed earlier. In cases diagnosed after 1980, the proportion identified at early stages was higher (77% v 67%) and survival seemed improved but the differences were not statistically significant. Although these results do not encourage an optimistic view of screening effectiveness in this population, the limits inherent in the present study make it impossible to draw any firm conclusion. Studies restricted to public domain information do not appear to have sufficient data to evaluate workplace screening programs.
PubMed ID
2074510 View in PubMed
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Body burden of aluminum in relation to central nervous system function among metal inert-gas welders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198549
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Apr;26(2):118-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
V. Riihimäki
H. Hänninen
R. Akila
T. Kovala
E. Kuosma
H. Paakkulainen
S. Valkonen
B. Engström
Author Affiliation
Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki. vesa.riihimaki@occuphelath.fi
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Apr;26(2):118-30
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aluminum - adverse effects - blood - urine
Body Burden
Central Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Depressive Disorder - chemically induced
Electroencephalography
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Fatigue - chemically induced
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Memory Disorders - chemically induced
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupational Health
Probability
Risk assessment
Welding
Abstract
The relationship between elevated internal aluminum loads and central nervous system function was studied among aluminum welders, and the threshold level for adverse effect was defined.
For 65 aluminum welders and 25 current mild steel welders body burden was estimated, and the aluminum concentrations in serum (S-Al) and urine (U-Al) were analyzed with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background correction. Referents and low-exposure and high-exposure groups were defined according to an aggregated measure of aluminum body burden, the group median S-Al levels being 0.08, 0.14, and 0.46 micromol/l, respectively, and the corresponding values for U-Al being 0.4, 1.8, and 7.1 micromol/l. Central nervous system functions were assessed with a neuropsychological test battery, symptom and mood questionnaires, a visual and quantitative analysis of electroencephalography (EEG), and P3 event-related potentials with pitch and duration paradigms.
Subjective symptoms showed exposure-related increases in fatigue, mild depression, and memory and concentration problems. Neuropsychological testing revealed a circumscribed effect of aluminum, mainly in tasks demanding complex attention and the processing of information in the working memory system and in the analysis and recall of abstract visual patterns. The visual EEG analysis revealed pathological findings only for aluminum welders. Mild, diffuse abnormalities were found in 17% of the low-exposure group and 27% of the high-exposure group, and mild to moderate epileptiform abnormalities at a frequency of 7% and 17%, respectively.
Both objective neurophysiological and neuropsychological measures and subjective symptomatology indicated mild but unequivocal findings dose-dependently associated with increased aluminum body burden. The study indicates that the body burden threshold for adverse effect approximates an U-Al value of 4-6 micromol/l and an S-Al value of 0.25-0.35 micromol/l among aluminum welders.
PubMed ID
10817377 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Study of Health and Aging: risk factors for Alzheimer's disease in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216949
Source
Neurology. 1994 Nov;44(11):2073-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Source
Neurology. 1994 Nov;44(11):2073-80
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Aluminum - adverse effects
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
To study risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on data from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.
Population-based case-control study.
Communities and institutions in 10 Canadian provinces.
Two hundred fifty-eight cases clinically diagnosed with probable AD, with onset of symptoms within 3 years of diagnosis, and 535 controls, frequency matched on age group, study center, and residence in community or institution, clinically confirmed to be cognitively normal.
Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression for previously hypothesized and potential risk factors for AD.
The OR for family history of dementia was significantly elevated (2.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.53 to 4.51) and increased with the number of relatives with dementia. Those with less education were at higher risk of AD, with an OR of 4.00 (95% CI, 2.49 to 6.43) for those with 0 to 6 years, in comparison with those with 10 or more years. Head injury achieved borderline significance. A history of arthritis resulted in a low risk of AD (OR = 0.54; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.81), as did a history of use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Initial analyses showed an increased risk of AD for occupational exposure to glues as well as to pesticides and fertilizers; the increased risk was greater in those with less education.
This study confirmed a number of previously reported risk factors for AD, but provided little support for others. A new finding was an increased risk for those with occupational exposure to glues as well as pesticides and fertilizers, but this needs further study.
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 1995 Aug;45(8):16357644077
PubMed ID
7969962 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among workers in six Norwegian aluminum plants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20008
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Dec;26(6):461-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
P. Romundstad
A. Andersen
T. Haldorsen
Author Affiliation
The Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo. pr@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Dec;26(6):461-9
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Humans
Incidence
Industry
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study investigated associations between exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and the incidence of lung, bladder, kidney, and pancreatic cancer among Norwegian aluminum plant workers. METHODS: Cancer incidence was investigated from 1953 to 1996 among 11,103 men employed for more than 3 years in the industry, giving 272,554 person-years during follow-up. A job exposure matrix was constructed to estimate exposure to particulate PAH and fluorides. The observed cases of cancer were compared with expected figures calculated from national rates. Dose-response relations were investigated by internal comparisons using Poisson regression and stratified analyses for standardized incidence ratio. Potential confounding by smoking was investigated in subanalyses restricted to 3 of the plants. RESULTS: The study showed an overall excess for bladder cancer, standardized incidence ratio 1.3 (95% confidence interval 1.1-1.5), which increased with increasing cumulative exposure to PAH and reached a relative risk of about 2 for the upper exposure category in the analysis with 30 years of lag time. There was no association between cumulative PAH exposure and lung cancer, but there were indications of an elevated risk of kidney cancer among the most heavily PAH-exposed persons in the analyses with a lag time of 30 years. For pancreatic cancer we found a higher incidence among the PAH-exposed persons than among the unexposed ones, but no clear dose-response association was found. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed an association between bladder cancer and exposure to PAH, but gave no support to an association between PAH exposure and lung cancer in the primary aluminum industry.
PubMed ID
11201392 View in PubMed
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Cancer morbidity in workers at aluminum foundries and secondary aluminum smelters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21916
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Nov;32(5):467-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
A I Seldén
H B Westberg
O. Axelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Orebro Medical Centre Hospital, Sweden. anders.selden@orebroll.se
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Nov;32(5):467-77
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Aluminum - adverse effects
Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Intestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - ethnology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupations
Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
In a Swedish cohort of workers (n = 6,454) from seven aluminum foundries and three secondary aluminum (scrap) smelters there was no overall excess risk of cancer among male or female workers less than 85 years of age (males: 325 observed cases, standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91-1.13; females: 22 cases, SIR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.60-1.44). In male workers, however, significantly elevated risk estimates were observed for cancer of the lung (51 cases; SIR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.11-1.96), anorectal cancer (33 cases; SIR 2.13, 95% CI = 1.47-2.99), and sinonasal cancer (4 cases; SIR = 4.70, 95% CI = 1.28-12.01). There was no increase of urinary bladder or liver cancer. Lung cancer risks were highest in workers with a short duration of employment (
PubMed ID
9327070 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.