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Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59663
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Jorhem
G. Haegglund
Author Affiliation
Chemistry Division 2, National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Beverages - analysis
Cereals - chemistry
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Meat - analysis
Milk - analysis
Shellfish - analysis
Sweden
Tea - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources.
PubMed ID
1542992 View in PubMed
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