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1999 Pediatric Nursing Humanitarian Award Recipient: Craig Kielburger, founder of Free the Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190111
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 1999 Sep-Oct;25(5):522-6
Publication Type
Article

Accessing health services through the back door: a qualitative interview study investigating reasons why people participate in health research in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257231
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anne Townsend
Susan M Cox
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2B5, Canada. atownsen@exchange.ubc.ca.
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altruism
Biomedical research
British Columbia
Communication
Comprehension
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Motivation
Patient Selection
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Research Subjects - psychology
Therapeutic Misconception
Abstract
Although there is extensive information about why people participate in clinical trials, studies are largely based on quantitative evidence and typically focus on single conditions. Over the last decade investigations into why people volunteer for health research have become increasingly prominent across diverse research settings, offering variable based explanations of participation patterns driven primarily by recruitment concerns. Therapeutic misconception and altruism have emerged as predominant themes in this literature on motivations to participate in health research. This paper contributes to more recent qualitative approaches to understanding how and why people come to participate in various types of health research. We focus on the experience of participating and the meanings research participation has for people within the context of their lives and their health and illness biographies.
This is a qualitative exploratory study informed by grounded theory strategies. Thirty-nine participants recruited in British Columbia and Manitoba, Canada, who had taken part in a diverse range of health research studies participated in semi-structured interviews. Participants described their experiences of health research participation including motivations for volunteering. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparisons. Coding and data management was supported by Nvivo-7.
A predominant theme to emerge was 'participation in health research to access health services.' Participants described research as ways of accessing: (1) Medications that offered (hope of) relief; (2) better care; (3) technologies for monitoring health or illness. Participants perceived standard medical care to be a "trial and error" process akin to research, which further blurred the boundaries between research and treatment.
Our findings have implications for recruitment, informed consent, and the dichotomizing of medical/health procedures as either research or treatment. Those with low health status may be more vulnerable to potential coercion, suggesting the need for a more cautious approach to obtaining consent. Our findings also indicate the need for boundary work in order to better differentiate treatment and research. It is important however to acknowledge a categorical ambiguity; it is not always the case that people are misinformed about the possible benefits of research procedures (i.e., therapeutic misconception); our participants were aware that the primary purpose of research is to gain new knowledge yet they also identified a range of actual health benefits arising from their participation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24119203 View in PubMed
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Addressing the burden of post-conflict surgical disease - strategies from the North Caucasus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135930
Source
Glob Public Health. 2011;6(6):669-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karsten Lunze
Fatima I Lunze
Author Affiliation
Preventive Medicine, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. karsten.lunze@post.harvard.edu
Source
Glob Public Health. 2011;6(6):669-77
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Blast Injuries - complications - psychology - surgery
Capacity Building - methods
Child
Disaster Planning - methods - standards
Ear, Middle - injuries - surgery
Explosions
General Surgery - manpower
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
International Cooperation
Needs Assessment
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Prisoners - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Schools
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Terrorism
War
Abstract
The 2004 terror attack on a school in Beslan, North Caucasus, with more than 1300 children and their families taken hostage and 334 people killed, ended after extreme violence. Following the disaster, many survivors with blast ear injuries developed complications because no microsurgery services were available in the region. Here, we present our strategies in North Ossetia to strengthen subspecialty surgical care in a region of instable security conditions. Disaster modifies disease burden in an environment of conflict-related health-care limitations. We built on available secondary care and partnered international with local stakeholders to reach and treat victims of a humanitarian disaster. A strategy of mutual commitment resulted in treatment of all consenting Beslan victims with blast trauma sequelae and of non disaster-related patients. Credible, sustained partnerships and needs assessments beyond the immediate phases after a disaster are essential to facilitate a meaningful transition from humanitarian aid to capacity building exceeding existing insufficient standards. Psychosocial impacts of disaster might constitute a barrier to care and need to be assessed when responding to the burden of surgical disease in conflict or post-conflict settings. Involving local citizen groups in the planning process can be useful to identify and access vulnerable populations. Integration of our strategy into broader efforts might strengthen the local health system through management and leadership.
PubMed ID
21432701 View in PubMed
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Advancing the population health agenda: uniting altruism and self-interest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199426
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Nov-Dec;90 Suppl 1:S66-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
S J Lewis
Author Affiliation
Access Consulting Ltd., Saskatoon. sj.lewis@home.com
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Nov-Dec;90 Suppl 1:S66-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Canada
Health Policy
Humans
Public Health
PubMed ID
10686766 View in PubMed
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Against dichotomies: On mature care and self-sacrifice in care ethics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286954
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2017 Sep;24(6):694-703
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Inge van Nistelrooij
Carlo Leget
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2017 Sep;24(6):694-703
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Empathy - ethics
Ethical Theory
Ethics, Nursing
Humans
Moral Development
Norway
Professional-Patient Relations - ethics
Abstract
In previous issues of this journal, Carol Gilligan's original concept of mature care has been conceptualized by several (especially Norwegian) contributors. This has resulted in a dichotomous view of self and other, and of self-care and altruism, in which any form of self-sacrifice is rejected. Although this interpretation of Gilligan seems to be quite persistent in care-ethical theory, it does not seem to do justice to either Gilligan's original work or the tensions experienced in contemporary nursing practice.
A close reading of Gilligan's concept of mature care leads to a view that differs radically from any dichotomy of self-care and altruism. Instead of a dichotomous view, a dialectical view on self and other is proposed that builds upon connectedness and might support a care-ethical view of nursing that is more consistent with Gilligan's own critical insights such as relationality and a practice-based ethics. A concrete case taken from nursing practice shows the interconnectedness of professional and personal responsibility. This underpins a multilayered, complex view of self-realization that encompasses sacrifices as well.
When mature care is characterized as a practice of a multilayered connectedness, caregivers can be acknowledged for their relational identity and nursing practices can be recognized as multilayered and interconnected. This view is better able to capture the tensions that are related to today's nursing as a practice, which inevitably includes sacrifices of self. In conclusion, a further discussion on normative conceptualizations of care is proposed that starts with a non-normative scrutiny of caring practices.
PubMed ID
26811398 View in PubMed
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The American Hospital in Moscow: A Lesson in International Cooperation, 1917-23.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268717
Source
Med Hist. 2015 Oct;59(4):554-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Susan Grant
Source
Med Hist. 2015 Oct;59(4):554-74
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Germany
History, 20th Century
Hospitals - history
Humans
International Cooperation - history
Moscow
Protestantism - history
USSR
United States
Abstract
In its examination of American Medical Aid to Russia, this article shows how the best of intentions can have the potential to go horribly awry. It argues that the competing binary forces of international collaboration and goodwill versus political tensions and uncertainty combined to create an environment wherein actors and agents inhabited an ever changing and unpredictable international stage. Could American philanthropic organisations and individuals overcome political volatility, financial restrictions and ideological barriers? Just what would it take to establish an American hospital in Moscow, the Bolshevik seat of power? The attempt to establish the hospital proved to be an exercise in patience, persistence and prudence (although not always in equal measure). This article shows that international cooperation, while undoubtedly complicated, was certainly possible. The flow of information, materiel and personnel between the United States, Germany and Russia proved that good intentions, trust and a will to help others were valued. The history of American Medical Aid to Russia also demonstrates that the Quaker role of facilitator and interlocutor was vital in establishing a relationship of trust between Soviet Russia and the United States. This article discusses the difficulties that philanthropic organisations faced when navigating the choppy international waters of the early 1920s and highlights the rewards of successfully doing this. It argues that basic human relationships and trust were just as, if not sometimes more, important than ideology in determining the tenor of early US-Soviet relations.
PubMed ID
26352304 View in PubMed
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Are 'anonymous' and 'non-directed' prerequisites for living altruistic donation? The views of transplant physicians from France and Qu├ębec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157771
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jul;67(1):147-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Marie-Chantal Fortin
Marianne Dion-Labrie
Marie-Josée Hébert
Marie Achille
Hubert Doucet
Author Affiliation
Nephrology and Transplantation Division, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. marie-chantal.fortin@sympatico.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jul;67(1):147-51
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Attitude of Health Personnel
Confidentiality
Directed Tissue Donation - ethics
Disclosure
France
Humans
Kidney Transplantation
Living Donors - ethics
Physicians
Quebec
Tissue and Organ Procurement - ethics - methods
Abstract
It can be argued that living altruistic donors should remain anonymous and should not express preferences in the selection of organ recipients. This study aimed to describe the views of transplant physicians in France and Québec regarding these issues. A total of 27 French and 19 Québec renal transplant physicians took part in individual, semi-directed interviews. Almost all of the physicians agreed that anonymity is mandatory in living altruistic donation (LAD). Regarding the issue of directed donation, most of the French physicians (78%) were opposed to any form of the practice, compared to only a third of their Québec colleagues (32%). We found that these positions were embedded in their respective cultural, legal and social contexts. These results afford a better understanding of these complex issues in two different cultural contexts, and will be useful in the development of international guidelines for LAD.
PubMed ID
18406031 View in PubMed
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Artificial feeding for severely disoriented, elderly patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230801
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1989 May;35:1057-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1989
Author
Neil H McAlister
Nazlin K McAlister
Catherine G Challin
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1989 May;35:1057-62
Date
May-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Directives
Aged
Altruism
Beneficence
Canada
Coercion
Conscience
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cultural Diversity
Decision Making
Dementia
Equipment and Supplies
Ethics
Euthanasia, Passive
Humans
Jurisprudence
Life Support Care
Mental Competency
Nutritional Support
Paternalism
Patient Care
Physicians
Right to Die
Risk
Risk assessment
Social Values
Third-Party Consent
Treatment Refusal
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
The issue of artificial feeding for patients with dementia who refuse feeding by hand is a wrenching emotional problem that can cloud clinical judgement. It is helpful to apply an analytic approach to decision making. There are five steps: gathering a comprehensive clinical database; defining the goal of treatment; knowing the treatment options available, their burdens and potential benefits; understanding the law; and defining the moral framework in which care is being given. Such an approach can be used to formulate a plan of treatment in the best interests of incompetent elderly patients who cannot speak for themselves.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11659211 View in PubMed
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The art of professional development and caring in cancer nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16482
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2006 Mar;8(1):20-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Yvonne Wengström
Marieanne Ekedahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Research and Education and the Institute of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Yvonne.Wengström@Karolinska.se
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2006 Mar;8(1):20-6
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Altruism
Art
Attitude of Health Personnel
Career Choice
Empathy
Existentialism - psychology
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Narration
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Oncologic Nursing - education - organization & administration
Professional Competence
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sweden
Terminal Care - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
The impetus for this qualitative study was the premise expressed by lay people that nursing terminally ill cancer patients must be depressing and difficult to cope with. Its focus was nurses' stress and coping strategies, both secular and religious. Data was collected using a narrative life-story approach, and then Lazaruz and Folkman's coping theory and Pargament's theory on the psychology of religion were used during the analysis of the data. Several factors were identified, related to the individual and group levels, that influence a nurse's identity and professional development. A person's life orientation was suggested as a first concept for developing a professional paradigm that includes caritas as a main orienting factor. Directed by the nurse's secular and religious orientation, competence develops, making it possible to understand, analyze, manage, and appreciate the significance of the professional work of caring.
PubMed ID
16451425 View in PubMed
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126 records – page 1 of 13.