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Allostatic load: single parents, stress-related health issues, and social care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162977
Source
Health Soc Work. 2007 May;32(2):89-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Randy L Johner
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Regina, Regian, Saskatchewan, Canada. johner1r@uregina.ca
Source
Health Soc Work. 2007 May;32(2):89-94
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allostasis - physiology
Canada
Health status
Humans
Poverty
Single Parent - psychology
Social Work
Stress, Psychological - physiopathology
Abstract
This article explores the possible relationships between allostatic load (AL) and stress-related health issues in the low-income single-parent population, using both a population health perspective (PHP) and a biological framework. A PHP identifies associations among such factors as gender, income, employment, and social support and their potential effect on health outcomes. A PHP also recognizes physiological and pathological manifestations of the body such as stress (mental or somatic) and individual biological parameters (for example, glucose levels) as health determinants. AL uses an aggregate score of individual biological parameters as a health measure that is exacerbated through repetitive movement of physiologic systems under stress. The social work profession should incorporate knowledge of both PHP and AL into its theory and practice domains for effective care of vulnerable populations such as single-parent families.
PubMed ID
17571642 View in PubMed
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Associations between stress and hearing problems in humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120675
Source
Hear Res. 2013 Jan;295:9-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Barbara Canlon
Töres Theorell
Dan Hasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Hear Res. 2013 Jan;295:9-15
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allostasis
Female
Hearing Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prevalence
Risk factors
Stress, Physiological
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden - epidemiology
Tinnitus - etiology
Abstract
Hearing problems are a public health issue with prevalence figures far more common than previously estimated. There are well-established risk factors of hearing problems such as age, sex and noise exposure history. Here, we demonstrate additional risk factors, i.e. socioeconomic status and long-term stress exposure that are found to increase the risk of hearing problems. In order to proactively intervene and prevent hearing problems, these newly recognized risk factors need to be taken into consideration. When taking these new risk factors into account, sex differences become even more apparent than previously found. The aim of this review is to summarize our recent findings about the associations between stress and hearing problems.
PubMed ID
22982334 View in PubMed
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Determining pancreatic ß-cell compensation for changing insulin sensitivity using an oral glucose tolerance test.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260781
Source
Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Nov 1;307(9):E822-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2014
Author
Thomas P J Solomon
Steven K Malin
Kristian Karstoft
Sine H Knudsen
Jacob M Haus
Matthew J Laye
Maria Pedersen
Bente K Pedersen
John P Kirwan
Source
Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Nov 1;307(9):E822-9
Date
Nov-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allostasis
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - metabolism - physiopathology
Diagnosis, Differential
Disease Progression
Female
Glucose Clamp Technique
Glucose Intolerance - blood - diagnosis - metabolism - physiopathology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Insulin - blood - secretion
Insulin Resistance
Insulin-Secreting Cells - secretion
Male
Middle Aged
Ohio
Prediabetic State - blood - diagnosis - metabolism - physiopathology
Abstract
Plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide responses during an OGTT are informative for both research and clinical practice in type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to use such information to determine insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion so as to calculate an oral glucose disposition index (DI(OGTT)) that is a measure of pancreatic ß-cell insulin secretory compensation for changing insulin sensitivity. We conducted an observational study of n = 187 subjects, representing the entire glucose tolerance continuum from normal glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes. OGTT-derived insulin sensitivity (S(I OGTT)) was calculated using a novel multiple-regression model derived from insulin sensitivity measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp as the independent variable. We also validated the novel S(I OGTT) in n = 40 subjects from an independent data set. Plasma C-peptide responses during OGTT were used to determine oral glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS(OGTT)), and DI(OGTT) was calculated as the product of S(I OGTT) and GSIS(OGTT). Our novel S(I OGTT) showed high agreement with clamp-derived insulin sensitivity (typical error = +3.6%; r = 0.69, P
PubMed ID
25184989 View in PubMed
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Does 'existential unease' predict adult multimorbidity? Analytical cohort study on embodiment based on the Norwegian HUNT population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287313
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 11 16;6(11):e012602
Publication Type
Article
Date
11-16-2016
Author
Margret Olafia Tomasdottir
Johann Agust Sigurdsson
Halfdan Petursson
Anna Luise Kirkengen
Tom Ivar Lund Nilsen
Irene Hetlevik
Linn Getz
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 11 16;6(11):e012602
Date
11-16-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allostasis
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Exercise
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Self Concept
Abstract
Multimorbidity is prevalent, and knowledge regarding its aetiology is limited. The general pathogenic impact of adverse life experiences, comprising a wide-ranging typology, is well documented and coherent with the concept allostatic overload (the long-term impact of stress on human physiology) and the notion embodiment (the conversion of sociocultural and environmental influences into physiological characteristics). Less is known about the medical relevance of subtle distress or unease. The study aim was to prospectively explore the associations between existential unease (coined as a meta-term for the included items) and multimorbidity.
Our data are derived from an unselected Norwegian population, the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, phases 2 (1995-1997) and 3 (2006-2008), with a mean of 11 years follow-up.
The analysis includes 20 365 individuals aged 20-59 years who participated in both phases and was classified without multimorbidity (with 0-1 disease) at baseline.
From HUNT2, we selected 11 items indicating 'unease' in the realms of self-esteem, well-being, sense of coherence and social relationships. Poisson regressions were used to generate relative risk (RR) of developing multimorbidity, according to the respondents' ease/unease profile.
A total of 6277 (30.8%) participants developed multimorbidity. They were older, more likely to be women, smokers and with lower education. 10 of the 11 'unease' items were significantly related to the development of multimorbidity. The items 'poor self-rated health' and 'feeling dissatisfied with life' exhibited the highest RR, 1.55 and 1.44, respectively (95% CI 1.44 to 1.66 and 1.21 to 1.71). The prevalence of multimorbidity increased with the number of 'unease' factors, from 26.7% for no factor to 49.2% for 6 or more.
In this prospective study, 'existential unease' was associated with the development of multimorbidity in a dose-response manner. The finding indicates that existential unease increases people's vulnerability to disease, concordant with current literature regarding increased allostatic load.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27852715 View in PubMed
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The effect of allostatic load on hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis before and after secondary vaccination in Atlantic salmon postsmolts (Salmo salar L.).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260701
Source
Fish Physiol Biochem. 2014 Apr;40(2):527-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Martin H Iversen
Robert A Eliassen
Source
Fish Physiol Biochem. 2014 Apr;40(2):527-38
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone - metabolism
Aeromonas salmonicida - immunology
Allostasis - immunology - physiology
Animal Welfare
Animals
Feedback, Physiological
Fish Diseases - immunology - prevention & control
Fisheries
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - immunology - prevention & control - veterinary
Hydrocortisone - blood
Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System - immunology - physiology
Immunization, Secondary - methods - veterinary
Kidney - immunology - physiology
Norway
Osmoregulation
Salmo salar - growth & development - immunology - physiology
Stress, Physiological
Abstract
The experiment consisted of three experimental groups: (1) "vaccine and stress", (2) "stress and vaccine" and (3) control. All groups have previously been vaccinated 6 months prior to the start of the experiment. At the start of the experiment, the "vaccine and stress" group was vaccinated with Pentium Forte Plus for the second time (25.02.2008) and then given a daily stressor (confinement stressor 267 kg m-3 in 15 min) for a period of 4 weeks. The "stress and vaccine" group was given a similar daily stressor for 4 weeks and then vaccinated for the second time. The control group was neither stressed nor vaccinated a second time. The results indicates that fish in the "stress and vaccine" group may have entered an allostatic overload type 2 due to oversensitivity to ACTH, a reduced efficient negative feedback system with elevated baseline levels of plasma cortisol and reduced immune response with pronounced effects on the well-being of the animal. The "vaccine and stress" group may likewise have entered an allostatic overload type 1 response, with oversensitivity to ACTH and transient reduced efficient negative feedback system. This study shows that if plasma cortisol becomes elevated prior to vaccination, it could perhaps instigate an allostatic overload type 2 with dire consequences on animal welfare. To reduce the risk of compromising the animal welfare during commercial vaccination of salmon, one propose to grade the fish minimum a week prior to vaccination or grade simultaneously with vaccination. This could reduce the overall allostatic load during handling and vaccination and secure a healthy fish with intact immune response and improved animal welfare.
PubMed ID
24045864 View in PubMed
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Household crowding is associated with higher allostatic load among the Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257127
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Apr;68(4):363-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Mylene Riva
Pierrich Plusquellec
Robert-Paul Juster
Elhadji A Laouan-Sidi
Belkacem Abdous
Michel Lucas
Serge Dery
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Axe Santé des populations et pratiques optimales en santé, Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, , Québec, Canada.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Apr;68(4):363-9
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Allostasis - physiology
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Crowding
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Housing - standards
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Quebec - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - ethnology
Abstract
Household crowding is an important problem in some aboriginal communities that is reaching particularly high levels among the circumpolar Inuit. Living in overcrowded conditions may endanger health via stress pathophysiology. This study examines whether higher household crowding is associated with stress-related physiological dysregulations among the Inuit.
Cross-sectional data on 822 Inuit adults were taken from the 2004 Qanuippitaa? How are we? Nunavik Inuit Health Survey. Chronic stress was measured using the concept of allostatic load (AL) representing the multisystemic biological 'wear and tear' of chronic stress. A summary index of AL was constructed using 14 physiological indicators compiled into a traditional count-based index and a binary variable that contrasted people at risk on at least seven physiological indicators. Household crowding was measured using indicators of household size (total number of people and number of children per house) and overcrowding defined as more than one person per room. Data were analysed using weighted Generalised Estimating Equations controlling for participants' age, sex, income, diet and involvement in traditional activities.
Higher household crowding was significantly associated with elevated AL levels and with greater odds of being at risk on at least seven physiological indicators, especially among women and independently of individuals' characteristics.
This study demonstrates that household crowding is a source of chronic stress among the Inuit of Nunavik. Differential housing conditions are shown to be a marker of health inequalities among this population. Housing conditions are a critical public health issue in many aboriginal communities that must be investigated further to inform healthy and sustainable housing strategies.
PubMed ID
24385548 View in PubMed
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Impaired sleep and allostatic load: cross-sectional results from the Danish Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268481
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Dec;15(12):1571-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Alice Jessie Clark
Nadya Dich
Theis Lange
Poul Jennum
Ase Marie Hansen
Rikke Lund
Naja Hulvej Rod
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Dec;15(12):1571-8
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allostasis - physiology
Biomarkers - blood
Blood pressure
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Health status
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Interleukin-6 - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sleep Wake Disorders - etiology - physiopathology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Triglycerides - blood
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Understanding the mechanisms linking sleep impairment to morbidity and mortality is important for future prevention, but these mechanisms are far from elucidated. We aimed to determine the relation between impaired sleep, both in terms of duration and disturbed sleep, and allostatic load (AL), which is a measure of systemic wear and tear of multiple body systems, as well as with individual risk markers within the cardiac, metabolic, anthropometric, and immune system.
A cross-sectional population-based study of 5226 men and women from the Danish Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank with comprehensive information on sleep duration, disturbed sleep, objective measures of an extensive range of biological risk markers, and physical conditions.
Long sleep (mean difference 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13, 0.32) and disturbed sleep (0.14; 0.06, 0.22) were associated with higher AL as well as with high-risk levels of risk markers from the anthropometric, metabolic, and immune system. Sub-analyses suggested that the association between disturbed sleep and AL might be explained by underlying disorders. Whereas there was no association between short sleep and AL, the combination of short and disturbed sleep was associated with higher AL (0.19; 0.08, 0.30) and high-risk levels of immune system markers.
Our study suggests small but significant differences in the distribution of allostatic load, a pre-clinical indicator of disease risk and premature death, for people with impaired relative to normal sleep. Impaired sleep may be a risk factor for developing disease and be a risk marker for underlying illness or sleep disorders.
PubMed ID
25316292 View in PubMed
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Is self-rated health a stable and predictive factor for allostatic load in early adulthood? Findings from the Nord Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266532
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Sep;117:1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Tina Løkke Vie
Karl Ove Hufthammer
Turid Lingaas Holmen
Eivind Meland
Hans Johan Breidablik
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Sep;117:1-9
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Allostasis - physiology
Biological Markers - analysis
Child
Female
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
Self-rated health (SRH) is a widely used health indicator predicting morbidity and mortality in a wide range of populations. However, little is known about the stability and biological basis of SRH. The aim of this study was to map the stability of SRH from adolescence to early adulthood, and to examine the relationships between SRH and biological dysregulation, in terms of allostatic load (AL). The AL score comprises the eleven biomarkers systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), triglycerides, waist-hip ratio (WHR), diabetes risk profile, glucose, C-reactive protein (CRP) and body mass index (BMI). Eleven years prospective data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), Norway, were utilised. Baseline data were gathered from 9141 adolescents (mean age 15.9 years) in the Young-HUNT I survey (1995-1997) and follow-up data were gathered from the adult HUNT3 survey (2006-2008). Altogether, 1906 respondents completed both questionnaires and clinical measurements in both studies. Cross-tables for SRH at baseline and follow-up showed that SRH remained unchanged in 57% of the respondents. Only 3% of the respondents changed their ratings by two steps or more on a four-level scale. Further, linear regression analyses adjusted for age and gender revealed that SRH in adolescence predicted AL in young adulthood. Similar patterns were found for most of the individual biomarkers. The consistency found in SRH from adolescence to young adulthood, and its association with AL across time, indicate that routines for dealing with SRH early in life may be a central strategy to prevent morbidity in the adult population.
PubMed ID
25016460 View in PubMed
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Job insecurity as a predictor of physiological indicators of health in healthy working women: an extension of previous research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128755
Source
Stress Health. 2012 Aug;28(3):255-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Katharina Näswall
Petra Lindfors
Magnus Sverke
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. katharina.naswall@canterbury.ac.nz
Source
Stress Health. 2012 Aug;28(3):255-63
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allostasis - physiology
Arousal - physiology
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Hydrocortisone - metabolism
Longitudinal Studies
Saliva - chemistry
Self Report
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - metabolism - physiopathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Uncertainty
Women's health
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
Job insecurity has been linked to different negative outcomes, such as negative work attitudes and health problems, with most studies including self-reported outcomes. Extending earlier research, the present study includes both self-reported and physiological indicators of health and sets out to investigate whether higher levels of job insecurity are related to higher levels of allostatic load, higher levels of morning cortisol, more physician-diagnosed symptoms of ill-health and poorer self-rated health. The study also investigated whether self-rated health mediated the relation between job insecurity and physiological outcomes. This was cross-sectionally studied in a cohort of Swedish women who participated in a large-scale longitudinal study focusing on life span development and adaptation. The results showed that job insecurity was related to self-rated health and morning cortisol, and, contrary to expectations, that job insecurity was unrelated to allostatic load and physician ratings, both directly and indirectly. The results indicate that, in healthy working women, job insecurity may be less detrimental to long-term physiological health than originally hypothesized.
PubMed ID
22170746 View in PubMed
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Neighborhood perceptions and allostatic load: Evidence from Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291080
Source
Health Place. 2016 07; 40:1-8
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
07-2016
Author
Ioana van Deurzen
Naja Hulvej Rod
Ulla Christensen
Åse Marie Hansen
Rikke Lund
Nadya Dich
Author Affiliation
Tilburg University, Sociology Department, PO Box 90153, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands. Electronic address: i.a.vandeurzen@uvt.nl.
Source
Health Place. 2016 07; 40:1-8
Date
07-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Allostasis - physiology
Denmark
Environment
Female
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Perception - physiology
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Abstract
An influential argument explaining why living in certain neighborhoods can become harmful to one's health maintains that individuals can perceive certain characteristics of the neighborhood as threatening and the prolonged exposure to a threatening environment could induce chronic stress. Following this line of argumentation, in the present study we test whether subjective perceptions of neighborhood characteristics relate to an objective measure of stress-related physiological functioning, namely allostatic load (AL). We use a large dataset of 5280 respondents living in different regions of Denmark and we account for two alternative mechanisms, i.e., the objective characteristics of the living environment and the socio-economic status of individuals. Our results support the chronic stress mechanisms linking neighborhood quality to health. Heightened perceptions of disorder and pollution were found related to AL and this relationship was particularly robust for women.
PubMed ID
27156011 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.