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Diet before pregnancy and the risk of hyperemesis gravidarum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134673
Source
Br J Nutr. 2011 Aug;106(4):596-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Margaretha Haugen
Ase Vikanes
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Andrej M Grjibovski
Per Magnus
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Safety, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. margaretha.haugen@fhi.no
Source
Br J Nutr. 2011 Aug;106(4):596-602
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allium
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Hyperemesis Gravidarum - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Seafood
Severity of Illness Index
Water - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
Hyperemesis gravidarum (hyperemesis), characterised by severe nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy, has an unknown aetiology. The aim of the present study was to investigate food and nutrient intake before pregnancy and the risk of developing hyperemesis in women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. From 1999 to 2002, a total of 7710 pregnant women answered a FFQ about their diet during the 12 months before becoming pregnant and a questionnaire about illnesses during pregnancy, including hyperemesis. Only women who were hospitalised for hyperemesis were included as cases. Nutrient intakes during the year before pregnancy did not differ between the ninety-nine women who developed hyperemesis and the 7611 who did not. However, the intake of seafood, allium vegetables and water was significantly lower among women who developed hyperemesis than among women in the non-hyperemesis group. Relative risks of hyperemesis were approximated as OR, and confounder control was performed with multiple logistic regression. Women in the upper tertile of seafood consumption had a lower risk of developing hyperemesis than those in the lower tertile (OR 0·56, 95 % CI 0·32, 0·98), and women in the second tertile of water intake had a lower risk of developing hyperemesis than those in the first tertile (OR 0·43, 95 % CI 0·25, 0·73). The findings suggest that a moderate intake of water and adherence to a healthy diet that includes vegetables and fish are associated with a lower risk of developing hyperemesis.
PubMed ID
21554820 View in PubMed
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The first results of using the Allium test in estimating the chemical and radiation toxicity of bottom sediments in the Yenisei River.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279958
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2016 Jul;469(1):192-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
A Ya Bolsunovsky
E A Trofimova
A V Zueva
D V Dementiev
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2016 Jul;469(1):192-5
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allium - metabolism
Gamma Rays
Plant Roots - metabolism
Rivers
Siberia
Water Pollutants, Chemical - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - metabolism
Abstract
The first results of the use of the Allium test for estimation of toxicity of bottom sediments in the Yenisei River and the effect of external ?-radiation under laboratory conditions are presented. The effect of stimulation of the onion root growth, i.e., the absence of toxicity was discovered in toxicological experiments using bottom sediments and under external ?-radiation. The stimulating effect of radiation on the growth of onion roots limits the use of the Allium test for testing samples from the Yenisei River ecosystem in the zone subjected to the impact of radioactive discharges from the Mining and Chemical Combine.
PubMed ID
27595829 View in PubMed
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Flavonoid intake and coronary mortality in Finland: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212623
Source
BMJ. 1996 Feb 24;312(7029):478-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-1996
Author
P. Knekt
R. Jarvinen
A. Reunanen
J. Maatela
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1996 Feb 24;312(7029):478-81
Date
Feb-24-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Allium
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - mortality
Diet
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quercetin - administration & dosage
Risk factors
Abstract
To study the association between dietary intake of flavonoids and subsequent coronary mortality.
A cohort study based on data collected at the Finnish mobile clinic health examination survey from 1967-72 and followed up until 1992.
30 communities from different parts of Finland.
5133 Finnish men and women aged 30-69 years and free from heart disease at baseline.
Dietary intake of flavonoids, total mortality, and coronary mortality.
In women a significant inverse gradient was observed between dietary intake of flavonoids and total and coronary mortality. The relative risks between highest and lowest quarters of flavonoid intake adjusted for age, smoking, serum cholesterol concentration, blood pressure, and body mass index were 0.69 (95% confidence interval 0.53 to 0.90) and 0.54 (0.33 to 0.87) for total and coronary mortality, respectively. The corresponding values for men were 0.76 (0.63 to 0.93) and 0.78 (0.56 to 1.08), respectively. Adjustment for intake of antioxidant vitamins and fatty acids weakened the associations for women; the relative risks for coronary heart disease were 0.73 (0.41 to 1.32) and 0.67 (0.44 to 1.00) in women and men, respectively. Intakes of onions and apples, the main dietary sources of flavonoids, presented similar associations. The relative risks for coronary mortality between highest and lowest quarters of apple intake were 0.57 (0.36 to 0.91) and 0.81 (0.61 to 1.09) for women and men, respectively. The corresponding values for onions were 0.50 (0.30 to 0.82) and 0.74 (0.53 to 1.02), respectively.
The results suggest that people with very low intakes of flavonoids have higher risks of coronary disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8597679 View in PubMed
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Intakes of garlic and dried fruits are associated with lower risk of spontaneous preterm delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113693
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Jul;143(7):1100-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Ronny Myhre
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Solveig Myking
Merete Eggesbø
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Margaretha Haugen
Bo Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Genes and Environment, Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. ronny.myhre@fhi.no
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Jul;143(7):1100-8
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allium
Child
Diet
Female
Fetal Membranes, Premature Rupture - prevention & control
Food Handling
Fruit
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Several studies have found associations between microbial infections during pregnancy and preterm delivery (PTD). We investigated the influence of food with antimicrobial and prebiotic components on the risk of spontaneous PTD. A literature search identified microbes associated with spontaneous PTD. Subsequently, 2 main food types (alliums and dried fruits) were identified to contain antimicrobial components that affect the microbes associated with spontaneous PTD; they also contained dietary fibers recognized as prebiotics. We investigated intake in 18,888 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort (MoBa), of whom 950 (5%) underwent spontaneous PTD (
Notes
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PubMed ID
23700347 View in PubMed
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[Mitotoxic and genotoxic effect of sediment on the example of the small rivers of the Orenburg region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119592
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 May-Jun;(3):37-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
G F Kol'chugina
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 May-Jun;(3):37-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allium - chemistry - cytology - growth & development
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Humans
Mitosis - drug effects
Mutagenicity Tests - methods
Retrospective Studies
Rivers
Russia
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The Purpose--an estimation mitotoxic and genotoxic activities of sediments from small Blyava and Kuraganka rivers (Orenburg region) with the use of ana- telophase method. The results have shown the reduction in mitotoxic and genotoxic activities of the sediments over the 2007-2010 period.
PubMed ID
23088122 View in PubMed
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Quercetin and isorhamnetin in sweet and red cultivars of onion (Allium cepa L.) at harvest, after field curing, heat treatment, and storage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98258
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Feb 24;58(4):2323-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-2010
Author
Marie E Olsson
Karl-Erik Gustavsson
Ingunn M Vågen
Author Affiliation
Department of Horticulture, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 103, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden. Marie.Olsson@ltj.slu.se
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Feb 24;58(4):2323-30
Date
Feb-24-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allium - chemistry - classification - growth & development
Antioxidants - analysis
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid - methods
Flavonols - analysis - chemistry
Food Preservation - methods
Glucosides - analysis
Hot Temperature
Humans
Norway
Quercetin - analysis
Abstract
Effects of heat treatment and storage on quercetin and isorhamnetin content, major and minor components of isorhamnetin, and quercetin glucosides and aglycone, were investigated in onion (Allium cepa L.). The sweet onion 'Recorra' and red onions 'Hyred' and 'Red Baron' were cultivated in the south part of Norway and thereafter stored for eight months. The onions were either not field dried, but stored directly, or field dried and then stored, or field dried and then heat treated before storage. Neither storage nor heat treatment caused any major differences in total flavonol content in the investigated sweet onion as well as in the red onion cultivars. The two major quercetin glucosides differed in their changes in content during storage; quercetin-4'-glucoside did not show any consistent changes during storage in the two red cultivars, independent of treatment, whereas quercetin-3,4'-diglucoside increased significantly by 30 or 51%, respectively, during storage in 'Hyred' and 'Red Baron' in the 24 h heat treated onions. Isorhamnetin-4'-glucoside, which might possibly be of special interest from a human health point of view, was present at 2-3 times higher amount in the sweet onion cultivar than in the two red cultivars. Some of the quercetin glucosides present at lower concentrations, isorhamnetin-3,4'-diglucoside, quercetin-3,7,4'-triglucoside, and quercetin-7,4'-diglucoside, increased during storage in all treatments in both 'Hyred' and 'Red Baron', though sometimes a decrease was found at the end of storage.
PubMed ID
20099844 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.