Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Lifestyle-Related Factors and Atopy in Seven Danish Population-Based Studies from Different Time Periods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273358
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0137406
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Tea Skaaby
Lise Lotte Nystrup Husemoen
Betina Heinsbæk Thuesen
Torben Jørgensen
Allan Linneberg
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0137406
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allergens - immunology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - blood - epidemiology - immunology
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Tract Diseases - blood - epidemiology - immunology
Abstract
The prevalence of allergic respiratory disease tends to increase in populations that adopt the so-called Westernized lifestyle. We investigated the association between atopy and several possible lifestyle-related factors in seven Danish population-based studies.
A total of 20048 persons participated in the seven studies. We used logistic regression to analyse the associations between possible determinants and atopy defined as serum specific IgE or skin prick test positivity against inhalant allergens. Associations were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). In addition, individual participant data meta-analyses were performed.
Atopy was significantly associated with younger age (OR per 1 year increase in age: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.97, 0.98); male sex (OR for males versus females: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.24, 1.45), heavy drinking (OR for heavy drinkers versus light drinkers: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.27), never smoking (OR for current versus never smokers: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.67, 0.80), and higher educational level (OR for educated versus uneducated: 1.27; 95% CI: 1.15, 1.41). Atopy was not associated with blood pressure, serum total cholesterol, physical activity or body mass except in women only, where we found a positive association (OR for obese vs. normal weight: 1.18; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.39) with ptrend = 0.032.
Of interest for preventive purposes, we found that atopy was associated with some of the reversible lifestyle-related factors that characterize a Westernized lifestyle.
Notes
Cites: Thorax. 2001 Jan;56(1):4-811120896
Cites: Allergy. 2001 Apr;56(4):328-3211284801
Cites: Respir Med. 2001 Apr;95(4):258-6411316107
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 May;163(6):1344-911371399
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2001 Sep;31(9):1409-1711591191
Cites: Curr Opin Immunol. 2001 Dec;13(6):701-811677093
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2002 Jan;26(1):59-6411821655
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2002 Jun;32(6):831-712047427
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007 Mar;119(3):591-617208288
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2007 Aug;37(8):1137-4217651142
Cites: Allergy. 2007 Oct;62(10):1205-1317845592
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007 Oct;120(4):965-717637474
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2008 Jan;38(1):152-6017979993
Cites: Allergy. 2008 May;63(5):570-418394131
Cites: Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2008;147(2):93-10018520153
Cites: Allergy. 2008 Nov;63(11):1418-2718925878
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2008 Nov;32(11):1984-9118782342
Cites: Clin Chim Acta. 2009 Mar;401(1-2):25-3219056369
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009;9:8819320986
Cites: J Agromedicine. 2009;14(2):222-719437281
Cites: Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2010;151(2):142-819752568
Cites: Allergy. 2010 Jul;65(7):859-6420015326
Cites: J Asthma. 2010 Sep;47(7):822-920707763
Cites: PLoS Med. 2014 Mar;11(3):e100161124618794
Cites: Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:60719224987694
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2014 Nov;47(5):576-8625113139
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2014 Nov;44(11):1361-7025220375
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2014 Nov-Dec;2(6):779-8525439371
Cites: Endocrine. 2015 Mar;48(2):541-5024917447
Cites: Autoimmunity. 2015;48(5):282-825600125
Cites: Endocrine. 2016 Feb;51(2):342-5026024976
Cites: Allergy. 2010 Nov;65(11):1446-5420456312
Cites: Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2010;153(4):372-720559003
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Jun;40(3):602-1020338891
Cites: J Pediatr (Rio J). 2011 Jul-Aug;87(4):336-4221842111
Cites: Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2011;156(1):117-821447968
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012 Feb;129(2):374-80, 380.e1-222088612
Cites: Br J Dermatol. 2012 Mar;166(3):498-50421999468
Cites: Diabet Med. 2012 Sep;29(9):e354-6022587629
Cites: Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Dec;20(6):1088-9423022702
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2002 Sep;12(3):166-7012232953
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2003 Feb;33(2):192-812580911
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2003 Feb;33(2):199-20512580912
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2002 Dec;32(12):1702-512653159
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2003 Oct;33(10):1360-714519141
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2003 Oct;33(10):1443-914519153
Cites: Thorax. 2003 Dec;58(12):1031-514645967
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2003 Oct;10(5):377-8614663300
Cites: J Biomed Sci. 2004 Sep-Oct;11(5):599-60615316134
Cites: Clin Biochem. 2004 Oct;37(10):882-9215369719
Cites: Addict Biol. 2004 Sep-Dec;9(3-4):195-20415511713
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1991 Mar;151(3):487-922001130
Cites: Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 1996 Dec;111(4):396-4028957114
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Jan 14;340(2):115-269887164
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005 Mar 1;171(5):440-515557135
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005 May;115(5):1102-415867879
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Sep;82(3):504-916155260
Cites: Allergy. 2006 Mar;61(3):344-816436144
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 2006 Apr;91(4):334-916428358
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006 May;117(5):1001-716675325
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(6):623-3117132596
Cites: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2007 Jan;98(1):70-417225723
Erratum In: PLoS One. 2015;10(10):e014140326485707
PubMed ID
26372449 View in PubMed
Less detail

The long-term programming effect of maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D in pregnancy on allergic airway disease and lung function in offspring after 20 to 25 years of follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266895
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2015 Jul;136(1):169-176.e2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Susanne Hansen
Ekaterina Maslova
Marin Strøm
Allan Linneberg
Thorhallur I Halldorsson
Charlotta Granström
Ronald Dahl
Hans Jürgen Hoffmann
Sjurdur F Olsen
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2015 Jul;136(1):169-176.e2
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allergens - immunology
Asthma - epidemiology - immunology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Eosinophil Cationic Protein - metabolism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Lung - immunology - physiopathology
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Spirometry
Time Factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
High prenatal vitamin D status has been linked to decreased risk of atopic diseases in early childhood, but whether such relations persist until adulthood has not been explored.
We sought to examine the association between maternal 25-hydryxovitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations and outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function in offspring with 20 to 25 years of follow-up.
In a prospective birth cohort with 965 pregnant women enrolled in 1988-1989, maternal 25(OH)D concentrations were quantified in serum from gestational week 30 (n = 850 [88%]). Offspring were followed in nationwide registries with complete follow-up to the age of 25 years (n = 850 [100%]). Additionally, at age 20 years, outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function were assessed in a subset of offspring by using blood samples and spirometry (n = 410 [45%]) and a questionnaire (n = 641 [70%]).
Exposure to a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration (=125 nmol/L) was associated with an increased risk of asthma hospitalizations in offspring (hazard ratio [HR], 1.81; 95% CI, 0.78-4.16) during 25 years of follow-up compared with the reference group (75-
PubMed ID
25649083 View in PubMed
Less detail

Specific IgE positivity against inhalant allergens and development of autoimmune disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271586
Source
Autoimmunity. 2015;48(5):282-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Tea Skaaby
Lise Lotte Nystrup Husemoen
Betina Heinsbæk Thuesen
Runa Vavia Fenger
Allan Linneberg
Source
Autoimmunity. 2015;48(5):282-8
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Allergens - immunology
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Autoimmune Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Allergic and autoimmune diseases have been suggested to be inversely associated. We investigated the association between atopy and development of any and specific types of autoimmune disease.
We included a total of 14,849 individuals from five population-based studies with measurements of atopy defined as specific IgE positivity against inhalant allergens. We followed the participants by linkage to the Danish National Patient Register (median follow-up time 11.2 years). Hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of autoimmune disease were estimated by Cox regression.
The risk for atopics versus non-atopics was: for any autoimmune disease (HR?=?0.99, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.18), thyrotoxicosis (HR?=?0.69, 95% CI: 0.34, 1.37), type 1 diabetes (HR?=?1.16, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.60), multiple sclerosis (HR?=?1.97, 95% CI: 0.95, 4.11), iridocyclitis (HR?=?0.82, 95% CI: 0.38, 1.74), Crohn's disease (HR?=?1.03, 95% CI: 0.47, 2.25), ulcerative colitis (HR?=?0.93, 95% CI: 0.52, 1.69), psoriasis vulgaris (HR?=?1.50, 95% CI: 0.86, 2.62), seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (HR?=?0.74, 95% CI: 0.48, 1.14) and polymyalgia rheumatica (HR?=?0.79, 95% CI: 0.44, 1.44).
We found no statistically significant associations between atopy and autoimmune disease, but we cannot exclude relatively small to moderate effects - protective or promotive - of atopy on autoimmune disease.
PubMed ID
25600125 View in PubMed
Less detail