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49 records – page 1 of 5.

7 years experience of photopatch testing with sunscreen allergens in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33993
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1998 Feb;38(2):61-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
B. Berne
A M Ros
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1998 Feb;38(2):61-4
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Allergens - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Child
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - etiology
Dermatitis, Photoallergic - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies
Patch Tests
Severity of Illness Index
Skin - drug effects - pathology - radiation effects
Sunscreening Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Sweden
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Urticaria - chemically induced
Abstract
Since 1990 7 sunscreen allergens have been included in the standard photopatch protocol at 2 Swedish dermatology clinics. 355 consecutive patients with suspected photosensitivity were tested, and in 28 of these (7.9%), a total of 42 allergic reactions were found. 80% of the reactions were of photocontact origin. The most common allergen was benzophenone-3 (Eusolex 4360), with 15 photocontact and 1 contact allergic reactions, followed by isopropyl dibenzoylmethane (Eusolex 8020) (8 photocontact, 4 contact) and butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane (Parsol 1789), with 6 photocontact reactions. There were 2 cases of photocontact allergy to phenylbenzimidazole sulfonic acid (Eusolex 232), which has not been reported previously. 1 case of contact urticaria from benzophenone-3 was accidentally found. In addition, 21 + reactions of doubtful relevance were noted in 14 patients: 16 on irradiated and 5 on non-irradiated test sites. Among these, irritant and phototoxic reactions may be included. These results indicate that the inclusion of UV filters in the standard photopatch protocol is important. Immediate-type testing for urticaria could also be of value.
PubMed ID
9506215 View in PubMed
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Advances in upper airway diseases and allergen immunotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186402
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003 Mar;111(3 Suppl):S793-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Harold S Nelson
Author Affiliation
National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, CO 80206, USA.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003 Mar;111(3 Suppl):S793-8
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Sublingual
Administration, Topical
Allergens - administration & dosage - chemistry
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Asthma - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hydrocortisone
Immunization - methods
Liposomes
Oligonucleotides - chemistry
Rhinitis - pathology - therapy
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Skin Tests
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies continue to find an increased prevalence of rhinitis, asthma, and atopy in more westernized countries. Both allergic and nonallergic rhinitis are risk factors for development of asthma, particularly in adulthood. In patients who have both asthma and rhinitis, treatment of the latter decreases the likelihood of emergency department visits or hospitalization for asthma. The protective effect of intranasal cortico-steroids is much greater than that of antihistamines. This mirrors the effect on rhinitis symptoms, in which nasal corticosteroids are much more effective than antihistamines, leukotriene receptor antagonists, or the combination of both. In patients with severe asthma, sinus mucosal thickening on computed tomography (CT) correlates with the severity of lower airway disease indicated by sputum eosinophilia, exhaled nitrous oxide (NO), functional residual capacity, and diffusing capacity. Preseasonal specific immunotherapy (SIT) is less effective, but additive to treatment with omalizumab. It is also somewhat less effective in reducing nasal symptoms than nasal corticosteroids; however, it is superior to them for reducing lower airway inflammation. SIT in children with only allergic rhinitis reduces both the incidence of asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. High-dose sublingual immunotherapy appears to be safe and effective, but less effective than injection immunotherapy. It is not clear that there are cost savings with sublingual immunotherapy, as home administration savings may be offset by the much larger amount of allergen extracts required. New approaches to allergen immunotherapy, designed to increase efficacy and safety, include conjugation of allergens to immunostimulatory sequences and encapsulation in liposomes. Cross-reactivity between inhalants and foods demonstrated by skin prick tests is more predictive of clinically important sensitivity than is that demonstrated by RAST testing. The latter, because of cross-reacting profilins, is often clinically irrelevant.
PubMed ID
12618745 View in PubMed
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Allergen-specific Th1 cells counteract efferent Th2 cell-dependent bronchial hyperresponsiveness and eosinophilic inflammation partly via IFN-gamma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15527
Source
J Immunol. 2001 Jan 1;166(1):207-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2001
Author
T J Huang
P A MacAry
P. Eynott
A. Moussavi
K C Daniel
P W Askenase
D M Kemeny
K F Chung
Author Affiliation
Thoracic Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College School of Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
Source
J Immunol. 2001 Jan 1;166(1):207-17
Date
Jan-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adoptive Transfer
Allergens - administration & dosage - immunology
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - immunology - pathology - prevention & control
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - immunology
Cell Line
Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte - administration & dosage - immunology
Inflammation - immunology - pathology - prevention & control
Injections, Intravenous
Interferon Type II - immunology - physiology
Interleukin-4 - antagonists & inhibitors - genetics
Lung - cytology - immunology
Male
Ovalbumin - administration & dosage - immunology
Pulmonary Eosinophilia - immunology - pathology - prevention & control
RNA, Messenger - antagonists & inhibitors
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Th1 Cells - immunology - transplantation
Th2 Cells - immunology - transplantation
Abstract
Th2 T cell immune-driven inflammation plays an important role in allergic asthma. We studied the effect of counterbalancing Th1 T cells in an asthma model in Brown Norway rats that favors Th2 responses. Rats received i.v. transfers of syngeneic allergen-specific Th1 or Th2 cells, 24 h before aerosol exposure to allergen, and were studied 18-24 h later. Adoptive transfer of OVA-specific Th2 cells, but not Th1 cells, and OVA, but not BSA exposure, induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) to acetylcholine and eosinophilia in a cell number-dependent manner. Importantly, cotransfer of OVA-specific Th1 cells dose-dependently reversed BHR and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophilia, but not mucosal eosinophilia. OVA-specific Th1 cells transferred alone induced mucosal eosinophilia, but neither BHR nor BAL eosinophilia. Th1 suppression of BHR and BAL eosinophilia was allergen specific, since cotransfer of BSA-specific Th1 cells with the OVA-specific Th2 cells was not inhibitory when OVA aerosol alone was used, but was suppressive with OVA and BSA challenge. Furthermore, recipients of Th1 cells alone had increased gene expression for IFN-gamma in the lungs, while those receiving Th2 cells alone showed increased IL-4 mRNA. Importantly, induction of these Th2 cytokines was inhibited in recipients of combined Th1 and Th2 cells. Anti-IFN-gamma treatment attenuated the down-regulatory effect of Th1 cells. Allergen-specific Th1 cells down-regulate efferent Th2 cytokine-dependent BHR and BAL eosinophilia in an asthma model via mechanisms that depend on IFN-gamma. Therapy designed to control the efferent phase of established asthma by augmenting down-regulatory Th1 counterbalancing mechanisms should be effective.
PubMed ID
11123294 View in PubMed
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Allergic contact dermatitis in response to budesonide reactivated by inhalation of the allergen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15363
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2002 Jun;46(6):880-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Marléne Isaksson
Magnus Bruze
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2002 Jun;46(6):880-5
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adult
Allergens - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Budesonide - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology
Double-Blind Method
Drug Hypersensitivity
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patch Tests
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Spirometry
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Up to 5% of patients with dermatitis who are consecutively patch tested are allergic to one or more corticosteroids. However, few reports of allergic mucosal and skin symptoms in patients with asthma and rhinitis caused by inhaled corticosteroids exist. OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine whether inhalation of budesonide would result in reactivation of patch test reactions caused by budesonide. METHODS: The study, which was randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled, was ethically reviewed by the Medical Faculty, University of Lund, Sweden. Fifteen nonasthmatic patients who were initially given a diagnosis of budesonide hypersensitivity on patch testing from less than 1 up to 8 years before the study were provoked with budesonide or placebo by inhalation 6 weeks after they had been patch tested with budesonide, its R and S diastereomers, and potentially cross-reacting substances. Lung function was studied by using spirometry and repeated peak expiratory flow measurements. RESULTS: In 4 of 7 patients who inhaled budesonide, reactivation of previously positive patch test reactions was noted within 24 hours, in contrast to 0 of 8 patients who inhaled placebo (P =.026). No adverse pulmonary responses could be detected. CONCLUSION: This study shows that allergic skin reactions may occur in patients with contact allergy to budesonide when inhaled forms of the drug are used.
PubMed ID
12063485 View in PubMed
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An oral Brown Norway rat model for food allergy: comparison of age, sex, dosing volume, and allergen preparation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51646
Source
Toxicology. 2004 Mar 15;196(3):247-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2004
Author
Kirsten Pilegaard
Charlotte Madsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition, Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, DK-2860 Søborg, Denmark. kpi@fdir.dk
Source
Toxicology. 2004 Mar 15;196(3):247-57
Date
Mar-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Allergens - administration & dosage - toxicity
Animals
Disease Models, Animal
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Food Hypersensitivity - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - analysis - biosynthesis
Immunoglobulin G - analysis - biosynthesis
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
The purpose of the presented experiments was to study the possibility of using the Brown Norway rat as a model for food allergy in our laboratory. Specific serum IgE against ovalbumin (OVA) was induced after dosing male and female Brown Norway rats daily by gavage for 35 days. The influence of various preparations of allergen: OVA grade II, OVA grade V, and fresh egg white, age (4 versus 8 weeks), dosing volumes, and animal suppliers was studied. A general finding was that females had statistically significantly higher specific IgE and IgG titres and number of responders than males. Egg white preparation, age, dosing volume, and animal supplier did not statistically significantly influence the median IgE and IgG titres and number of responders. The difference between immune responses in males and females could not be attributed to variations in daily intake of OVA or exposure via the lung. In our hands, the oral Brown rat food allergy model gives rise to a moderate number of IgE responders, 13-38 and 38-75% in males and females, respectively. For further experiments with this model in our laboratory, females seem the sex of choice.
PubMed ID
15036751 View in PubMed
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An oral sensitization model in Brown Norway rats to screen for potential allergenicity of food proteins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57536
Source
Methods. 1999 Sep;19(1):78-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
L M Knippels
G F Houben
S. Spanhaak
A H Penninks
Author Affiliation
Department of Target Organ Toxicology, TNO Nutrition and Food Research Institute, AJ Zeist, 3700, The Netherlands. Knippels@voeding.tno.nl
Source
Methods. 1999 Sep;19(1):78-82
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Allergens - administration & dosage - toxicity
Animals
Antibodies - blood
Blood pressure
Cattle
Chickens
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage - immunology - toxicity
Digestive System - immunology - physiopathology
Disease Models, Animal
Egg Proteins - administration & dosage - immunology - toxicity
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Humans
Immunization
Immunologic Techniques
Male
Milk Proteins - administration & dosage - immunology - toxicity
Ovalbumin - administration & dosage - immunology - toxicity
Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Respiratory Function Tests
Abstract
We developed an oral sensitization protocol for food proteins for the rat. Young Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to 1 mg ovalbumin (OVA) by daily gavage dosing for 42 days without the use of an adjuvant. OVA-specific IgE and IgG responses were determined by ELISA. On an oral challenge with OVA some clinical symptoms of food allergy-like effects on the respiratory system, blood pressure, and permeability of the gastrointestinal barrier were studied. In addition, BN rats were orally exposed to a total hen egg white protein (HEW) extract and cow's milk (CM) and the specificities of induced antibody responses were compared with the specificities of antibodies in sera from egg- and milk-allergic patients using immunoblotting. Animals orally exposed to the allergens developed specific IgE and IgG antibodies which recognized the same proteins compared with antibodies from egg- or CM-allergic patients. Among the various clinical symptoms of food allergy, gut permeability was increased after an oral challenge. In addition, some animals demonstrated a temporary decrease in breathing frequency or systolic blood pressure. The results obtained show that the Brown Norway rat is a suitable animal model for inducing specific IgG and IgE responses on daily intragastric dosing of OVA without the use of an adjuvant. Moreover, local immune-mediated effects on oral challenge are observed. The observation that enterally exposed BN rats and food-allergic patients demonstrate antibody responses to a comparable selection of proteins on exposure to different protein mixtures (HEW and CM) further supports the suitability of the BN rat as an animal model for food allergy research and for the study of the allergenicity of (novel) food proteins.
PubMed ID
10525441 View in PubMed
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Assay of the biologic activity of allergen skin test preparations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240763
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1984 Mar;73(3):324-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1984
Author
F. Björkstén
T. Haahtela
A. Backman
I. Suoniemi
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1984 Mar;73(3):324-31
Date
Mar-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Allergens - administration & dosage - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic
Finland
Histamine - diagnostic use
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - diagnosis
Male
Middle Aged
Reference Values
Skin Tests - methods - standards
Abstract
We studied the biologic activity of allergen preparations using a method involving skin prick tests in humans and the use of HEP (histamine equivalent prick) units. Results were found to be dependent on the population groups used in assays. If populations are not carefully standardized, results may vary by 1 power of 10. Accuracy can also be improved by the use of suitable allergen standard reference preparations, but such were not available to us. Confidence ranges for the biologic activities were relatively wide and varied with the allergen preparation and the population group. Typically, the 95% confidence range included values from one-fifth to five times the estimated HEP value when the number of subjects in the assay was 30 to 50 persons. When the preparations representing the same source material (e.g., timothy pollen) were assayed simultaneously in one population group of this size, a twofold or larger difference in HEP values generally proved significant. An examination of 43 commercial products showed that allergen preparations with biologic activities declared in HEP units had a more uniform biologic activity than those assayed with traditional methods and units (PNU/ml or weight/volume).
PubMed ID
6699313 View in PubMed
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Association between atopic sensitization and asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in swedish adults: pets, and not mites, are the most important allergens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15654
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1999 Jul;104(1):58-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
P. Plaschke
C. Janson
E. Norrman
E. Björnsson
S. Ellbjär
B. Järvholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Roskilde County Hospital, Denmark; Allergy Research Centre, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1999 Jul;104(1):58-65
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - analysis
Allergens - administration & dosage - analysis
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Animals, Domestic - immunology
Asthma - physiopathology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Mites - immunology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Skin Tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Atopic sensitization is a well-known risk factor for asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR). Mites have been regarded as the most important allergens, but the prevalence of sensitization to mites is relatively low in Sweden. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate possible associations between sensitization to various allergens and asthma and BHR in adults. METHODS: A random sample of 1859 subjects, aged 20 to 46 years, was investigated in a cross-sectional study by using a questionnaire, skin prick tests (SPTs), specific and total IgE measurements, and methacholine bronchial challenge tests. Possible associations were analyzed univariately and by using multivariate logistic regression analysis and proportional hazard regression analysis. RESULTS: Positive SPT and specific IgE results were more common in subjects with asthma and BHR than in subjects without these conditions for all allergens. The independent associations between positive SPT responses and asthma and BHR are given as adjusted prevalence ratios (PRRs): pets and asthma, PRR = 3.6; pets and BHR, PRR = 2.0; grass and asthma, PRR = 2.0; grass and BHR, PRR = 1.7; mites and asthma, PRR = 1.4; and mites and BHR, PRR = 1.2. The use of specific IgE measurements instead of SPTs showed essentially similar results. CONCLUSION: Cats and dogs were the sensitizing allergens most closely associated with asthma and BHR. The relationships with sensitization to grass and mites were less pronounced.
PubMed ID
10400840 View in PubMed
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Association between positive patch tests to epoxy resin and fragrance mix I ingredients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152274
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2009 Mar;60(3):155-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Klaus Ejner Andersen
Lars Porskjaer Christensen
Aage Vølund
Jeanne Duus Johansen
Evy Paulsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. keandersen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2009 Mar;60(3):155-7
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - administration & dosage - toxicity
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Epoxy Resins - administration & dosage - toxicity
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Patch Tests - statistics & numerical data
Perfume - administration & dosage - toxicity
Population Surveillance
Predictive value of tests
Research Design
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Both epoxy resin (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A) and fragrance mix I are included in the European baseline series of contact allergens. A significant association between positive reactions to epoxy resin and fragrance mix has been reported by others.
To investigate and possibly reproduce this association with the use of TRUE((R)) test data and supplementary tests with fragrance mix ingredients from the Department of Dermatology, Odense University Hospital.
Six thousand one hundred and fifteen consecutive eczema patients tested from 1995 to 2007 were included, and test results from all patients tested with fragrance mix ingredients were analysed.
One hundred and forty-five (2.4%) were positive to epoxy resin and 282 (4.6%) were positive to fragrance mix I. Nineteen were positive to both giving an odds ratio of 3.3, which is significant (95% CI 2.0-5.4). Analysis of association to individual fragrance mix ingredients showed a significant association to alpha-amyl cinnamal and isoeugenol.
The significant association between positive reactions to epoxy resin and fragrance mix I was reproduced. However, the clinical implications are not clarified, and even though the association may be coincidental, the fact that it can be reproduced with a different patch test system and in a different population speaks against a random result. Further studies may help to interpret the association.
PubMed ID
19260913 View in PubMed
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Associations between baseline allergens and polysensitization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92260
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2008 Aug;59(2):96-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Carlsen Berit Christina
Menné Torkil
Johansen Jeanne Duus
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Allergology, National Allergy Research Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Ledreborg Allé 40, 1., 2820 Gentofte, Denmark. bccarlsen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2008 Aug;59(2):96-102
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allergens - administration & dosage - diagnostic use
Cobalt - diagnostic use
Denmark
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - etiology
Disease Susceptibility - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Methanol - diagnostic use
Middle Aged
Myroxylon
Parabens - diagnostic use
Patch Tests - methods
Phenylenediamines - diagnostic use
Potassium Dichromate - diagnostic use
Probability
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Sesquiterpenes - diagnostic use
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Identification of patients at risk of developing polysensitization is not possible at present. An association between weak sensitizers and polysensitization has been hypothesized. OBJECTIVES: To examine associations of 21 allergens in the European baseline series to polysensitization. PATIENTS/METHODS: From a database-based study with 14 998 patients patch tested with the European baseline series between 1985 and 2005, a group of 759 (5.1%) patients were polysensitized. Odds ratios were calculated to determine the relative contribution of each allergen to polysensitization. RESULTS: Seven allergens--parabens mix, N-isopropyl-N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine, sesquiterpene lactone mix, wool alcohols, potassium dichromate, Myroxylon pereirae, and cobalt chloride - showed statistically significant positive associations to polysensitization. Five allergens p-phenylenediamine, neomycin sulfate, epoxy resin, primin, and nickel sulfate showed statistically significant negative associations to polysensitization. For the allergens with the strongest associations, only every second individual with these particular allergies had two or more additional allergies. CONCLUSIONS: No common denominator for the association between the allergens and the polysensitization was apparent, and any association, whether positive or negative, was relatively low. Based on these results, sensitization to specific baseline allergens cannot be used as risk indicators for polysensitization.
PubMed ID
18759876 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.