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A 3-year clinical follow-up of adult patients with 3243A>G in mitochondrial DNA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82145
Source
Neurology. 2006 May 23;66(10):1470-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-2006
Author
Majamaa-Voltti K A M
Winqvist S.
Remes A M
Tolonen U.
Pyhtinen J.
Uimonen S.
Kärppä M.
Sorri M.
Peuhkurinen K.
Majamaa K.
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. kirsi.majamaa-voltti@oulu.fi
Source
Neurology. 2006 May 23;66(10):1470-5
Date
May-23-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cognition Disorders - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - genetics
Disease Progression
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Electroencephalography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - genetics
Humans
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - genetics - ultrasonography
Lactates - blood
MELAS Syndrome - genetics - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mitochondria, Muscle - metabolism
Mosaicism
Neuropsychological Tests
Point Mutation
Pyruvates - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To follow the clinical course of patients with the mitochondrial DNA mutation 3243A>G for 3 years. METHODS: Thirty-three adult patients with the 3243A>G mutation entered a 3-year follow-up study. They were clinically evaluated annually, audiometry was performed, and samples were drawn for the analysis of blood chemistry and mutation heteroplasmy in leukocytes. Holter recording was performed three times during the follow-up and echocardiography, neuropsychological assessment, and quantitative EEG and brain imaging conducted at entry and after 3 years. RESULTS: The incidence of new neurologic events was low during the 3-year follow-up. Sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI) progressed, left ventricular wall thickness increased, mean alpha frequency in the occipital and parietal regions decreased, and the severity of disease index (modified Rankin score) progressed significantly. The rate of SNHI progression correlated with mutation heteroplasmy in muscle. The increase in left ventricular wall thickness was seen almost exclusively in diabetic patients. Seven patients died during the follow-up, and they were generally more severely affected than those who survived. CONCLUSIONS: Significant changes in the severity of disease, sensorineural hearing impairment, left ventricular hypertrophy, and quantitative EEG were seen in adult patients with 3243A>G during the 3-year follow-up.
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2007 Jan 9;68(2):163-417210904
PubMed ID
16717204 View in PubMed
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5-alpha-reductase 2 polymorphisms as risk factors in prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19112
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 2002 Jun;12(4):307-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Söderström T
Wadelius M
Andersson S-O
Johansson J-E
Johansson S
Granath F
Rane A
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital, S-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. torbjorn.soderstrom@lmk.ck.lul.se
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 2002 Jun;12(4):307-12
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Cell Differentiation
DNA - blood - metabolism
DNA Primers - chemistry
European Continental Ancestry Group
Genotype
Heterozygote
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Odds Ratio
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prostate-Specific Antigen - metabolism
Prostatic Neoplasms - enzymology - etiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Testosterone 5-alpha-Reductase - genetics
Abstract
Prostate cancer is a significant cause of death in Western countries and is under the strong influence of androgens. The steroid 5alpha-reductase 2 catalyzes the metabolism of testosterone into the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone in the prostate gland. The enzyme is a target in pharmacological treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia using specific inhibitors such as finasteride. Makridakis et al. have characterized the V89L and A49T polymorphisms in recombinant expression systems. The L allelic variant has a lower Vmax/Km ratio than the V variant. In the A49T polymorphism, the T variant has an increased Vmax/Km ratio. We performed a population-based case-control study of the impact of the SRD5A2 V89L and A49T polymorphisms on the risk of prostate cancer. We also studied the relation between the genotypes and age at diagnosis, tumor, node, metastasis stage, differentiation grade, prostate specific antigen and heredity. The study included 175 prostate cancer patients and 159 healthy controls that were matched for age. There was an association with SRD5A2 V89L LL genotype and metastases at the time of diagnosis, OR 5.67 (95% CI 1.44-22.30) when adjusted for age, differentiation grade, T-stage and prostate specific antigen. Heterozygous prostate cancer cases that carried the SRD5A2 A49T AT genotype were significantly younger than cases that carried the AA genotype, (mean age 66 years vs 71, P = 0.038). The SRD5A2 V89L and A49T polymorphisms were, however, not associated with altered prostate cancer risk. Further studies of the V89L polymorphism may lead to better understanding of the etiology of prostate cancer metastases.
PubMed ID
12042668 View in PubMed
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The 5alpha-reductase type II A49T and V89L high-activity allelic variants are more common in men with prostate cancer compared with the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173682
Source
Eur Urol. 2005 Oct;48(4):679-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Yvonne L Giwercman
Per-Anders Abrahamsson
Aleksander Giwercman
Virgil Gadaleanu
Göran Ahlgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Wallenberg Laboratory, entrance 46, SE - 205 02 Malmö, Sweden. yvonne.giwercman@kir.mas.lu.se
Source
Eur Urol. 2005 Oct;48(4):679-85
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3-Oxo-5-alpha-Steroid 4-Dehydrogenase - blood - genetics
Aged
Alanine
Alleles
Arginine
Case-Control Studies
Dihydrotestosterone - blood
Disease Progression
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutamine
Humans
Leucine
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Point Mutation
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prostatic Hyperplasia - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Receptors, Androgen - blood - genetics
Risk factors
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminal Repeat Sequences
Testosterone - blood
Threonine
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Valine
Abstract
To compare men with prostate disease with those from the general population regarding polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene and in the 5alpha-reductase II (SRD5A2) gene.
The SRD5A2 polymorphisms A49T, V89L and R227Q, the androgen receptor CAG and GGN repeats and sex hormone status was investigated in men with prostate cancer (CaP) (n=89), benign prostate hyperplasia (n=45) and healthy military conscripts (n=223).
The SRD5A2 high-activity allele variants A49T AT and V89L LL were more frequent in CaP-patients compared to general population, p=0.026 and p=0.05, respectively. CaP progression was, however, independent of SRD5A2 variants. In contrary, men with GGN
PubMed ID
16039774 View in PubMed
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6-Locus HLA allele and haplotype frequencies in a population of 1075 Russians from Karelia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301335
Source
Hum Immunol. 2019 Feb; 80(2):95-96
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Yvonne Hagenlocher
Beatrix Willburger
Geoffrey A Behrens
Alexander H Schmidt
Yuri Ioffe
Jürgen Sauter
Author Affiliation
DKMS German Bone Marrow Donor Center, Tübingen, Germany.
Source
Hum Immunol. 2019 Feb; 80(2):95-96
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alleles
Gene Frequency
Genetic Loci
Genetics, Population
Genotype
HLA Antigens - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Population Groups
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
A total of 1075 Russians from the Russian part of Karelia were genotyped at high-resolution for the human leukocyte antigen loci HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1, and -DPB1 using next generation sequencing methods. The haplotypic and allelic profiles as well as Hardy-Weinberg proportions of this population sample were evaluated. As the most frequent 6-locus haplotype, A*03:01?g?~?B*07:02?g?~?C*07:02?g?~?DRB1*15:01?g?~?DQB1*06:02?g?~?DPB1*04:01?g was identified with an estimated frequency of 3.5%. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium was detected at any of the loci studied. The HLA genotypic data of the population sample reported here are available publicly in the Allele Frequencies Net Database under the population name "Russia Karelia" and the identifier AFN3430.
PubMed ID
30391501 View in PubMed
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The 32-base pair deletion of the chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5-Delta32) is not associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis in 363 Scandinavian patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168816
Source
Tissue Antigens. 2006 Jul;68(1):78-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
E. Melum
T H Karlsen
U. Broomé
E. Thorsby
E. Schrumpf
K M Boberg
B A Lie
Author Affiliation
Institute of Immunology, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Sognsvannsyn 20, 0027 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Tissue Antigens. 2006 Jul;68(1):78-81
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Base Pairing
Case-Control Studies
Cholangitis, Sclerosing - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Disease Progression
Female
Gene Deletion
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Receptors, CCR5 - genetics
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on T-cells and macrophages. A 32-base pair deletion in the chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5-Delta32) leads to a non-functional receptor. Conflicting evidence exists whether this deletion is associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We genotyped the CCR5-Delta32 variant in 363 PSC patients and 366 controls. No significant increase in the Delta32 allele frequency was detected in the PSC patients compared to controls (12.7% vs 10.7% OR = 1.22, 95% CI [0.88, 1.68], P = 0.23). Survival analysis did not reveal any significant effects from CCR5-Delta32 genotypes on disease progression. Thus, in this study (power > 90%, given OR = 2, alpha = 0.05), we were unable to replicate previous findings and our results do not support an involvement of CCR5-Delta32 in either PSC susceptibility or progression.
Notes
Erratum In: Tissue Antigens. 2006 Aug;68(2):192
PubMed ID
16774544 View in PubMed
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37 Years of Body Mass Index and Dementia: Effect Modification by the APOE Genotype: Observations from the Prospective Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275033
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(4):1119-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Kristoffer Bäckman
Erik Joas
Margda Waern
Svante Östling
Xinxin Guo
Kaj Blennow
Ingmar Skoog
Deborah R Gustafson
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(4):1119-27
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alleles
Apolipoprotein E4 - genetics
Body mass index
Body Weight - genetics
Dementia - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Overweight and obesity in mid- and late-life may increase risk for dementia, whereas a decline in body weight or body mass index (BMI) and underweight in years preceding a clinical dementia diagnosis are also associated with dementia. Little is known about the modifying effect of the APOE genotype, a major susceptibility gene for Alzheimer's disease (AD), on the BMI-dementia adult life course trajectory.
We evaluated the exposure, BMI, in relationship to the outcome, clinical dementia, over 37 years, considering the effect modification of the APOE ?4 allele.
The Prospective Population Study of Women (PPSW) in Sweden is a systematic sample of 1462 women born 1908, 1914, 1918, 1922, and 1930 and aged 38-60 years at baseline. Examinations occurred in 1968, 1974, 1980, 1992, 2000, and 2005; 559 women had information on dementia, BMI, and APOE ?4 allele status, in addition to covariates. Statistical analyses were conducted using mixed effects regression models.
Trajectories of BMI over 37 years differed by APOE ?4 allele status. While women gained BMI similarly from mid-life to age 70 years, women with at least one APOE ?4 allele experienced BMI decline more quickly after age 70 years compared to women without an APOE ?4 allele. However, upon stratifying the sample by dementia occurrence, it appeared that dementia drove the overall BMI-trajectory. There was a main effect of age, interactions of age by APOE ?4 allele status, and age by presence versus absence of dementia.
Women with similar average BMI at mid-life exhibited different BMI trajectories in relation to dementia occurrence. In addition, the pattern of BMI decline in late-life differed on the basis of APOE ?4 allele possession. Thus, these data suggest roles for both dementia- and APOE-associated changes in BMI during the adult life course.
PubMed ID
26402098 View in PubMed
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164Ile allele in the beta2-Adrenergic receptor gene is associated with risk of elevated blood pressure in women. The Copenhagen City Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173671
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2005 Sep;15(9):633-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Amar A Sethi
Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen
Gorm B Jensen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2005 Sep;15(9):633-45
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Arginine - chemistry
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Denmark
Female
Gene Expression Regulation
Gene Frequency
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Glutamic Acid - chemistry
Glutamine - chemistry
Glycine - chemistry
Haplotypes
Heart rate
Heterozygote
Humans
Hypertension - genetics
Isoleucine - chemistry
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Risk
Risk factors
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Since beta2-adrenergic receptors are important regulators of blood pressure, genetic variation in this receptor could explain risk of elevated blood pressure in selected individuals. We tested the hypothesis that Gly16Arg, Gln27Glu, and Thr164Ile in the beta2-adrenergic receptor gene associated with elevated blood pressure.
We genotyped 9185 individuals from the adult Danish general population.
Allele frequencies of 16Arg, 27Glu, and 164Ile were 0.38, 0.44, and 0.01, respectively. Among women never treated with antihypertensive medication those heterozygous for Thr164Ile versus non-carriers had increased diastolic blood pressure (P=0.02). Women heterozygous for Thr164Ile versus non-carriers had an odds ratio for elevated blood pressure of 1.93 (95% CI: 1.30-2.86). Finally, women double heterozygous for Thr164Ile and Gln27Glu or Gly16Arg versus non-carriers at all 3 loci had an odds ratio for elevated blood pressure of 2.49 (1.28-4.85) or 3.19 (1.46-6.97). In men, blood pressure was not influenced by this genetic variation.
In women Thr164Ile heterozygosity is associated with increased diastolic blood pressure, and represent a risk factor for elevated blood pressure in women in the general population. This was most pronounced in those women also heterozygous for Gln27Glu or Gly16Arg.
PubMed ID
16041242 View in PubMed
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677 C-->T polymorphism of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene and preeclampsia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197794
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Aug;96(2):277-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
H. Laivuori
R. Kaaja
O. Ylikorkala
T. Hiltunen
K. Kontula
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. hannele.laivuori@pp.fimnet.fi
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Aug;96(2):277-80
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Amino Acid Substitution
Case-Control Studies
DNA Primers
Female
Finland
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Heterozygote
Humans
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2)
Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-NH Group Donors - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Pre-Eclampsia - enzymology - genetics
Pregnancy
Abstract
To evaluate C to T substitution at nucleotide 677 of N(5), N(10)-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene in women with prior preeclamptic or normotensive pregnancies.
Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotypes were determined in 113 Finnish women with preeclamptic first pregnancies and 103 controls with one or more normotensive pregnancies, using polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis. Preeclampsia was defined as severe in 100 women who fulfilled one or more of the subsequent criteria: systolic blood pressure (BP) at least 160 mmHg, diastolic BP at least 110 mmHg, or proteinuria at least 2 g per 24-hour urine collection.
There were no significant differences in prevalences of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotypes (CC, CT, and TT) between groups (57%, 40%, and 3% in the preeclamptic group and 54%, 39%, and 7%, respectively, in controls). The frequency of the T677 allele was 0.23 in the preeclamptic group and 0.26 in the control group (difference 0.03; 95% confidence interval -0.08, 0.14; P =.51). Our sample had 60% power to detect a difference of the allele frequencies similar to that (0.12) reported previously. The result was similar when analysis was restricted to patients with severe preeclampsia (T677 allele frequency 0.22).
A carrier status for the T677 allele of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene does not predispose to preeclampsia, at least in the Finnish population.
PubMed ID
10908777 View in PubMed
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The 20210 A allele of the prothrombin gene is a common risk factor among Swedish outpatients with verified deep venous thrombosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207569
Source
Thromb Haemost. 1997 Sep;78(3):990-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
A. Hillarp
B. Zöller
P J Svensson
B. Dahlbäck
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Lund University, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. andreas.hillarp@klkemi.mas.lu.se
Source
Thromb Haemost. 1997 Sep;78(3):990-2
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Female
Gene Frequency
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients
Phlebography
Protein C - physiology
Prothrombin - genetics
Risk factors
Sweden
Thrombophlebitis - genetics
Abstract
A dimorphism in the 3'-untranslated region of the prothrombin gene (G to A transition at position 20210) has recently been reported to be associated with increases in plasma prothrombin levels and in the risk of venous thrombosis. We have examined the prothrombin dimorphism among 99 unselected outpatients with phlebography verified deep venous thrombosis, and in 282 healthy controls. The prevalence of the 20210 A allele was 7.1% (7/99) in the patient group, and 1.8% (5/282) in the healthy control group (p = 0.0095). The relative risk of venous thrombosis was calculated to be 4.2 (95% CI, 1.3 to 13.6), and was still significant when adjustment was made for age, sex and the factor V:R506Q mutation causing APC resistance [odds ratio 3.8 (95% CI, 1.1 to 13.2)]. As previously reported, 28% of the patients were carriers of the factor V:R506Q mutation. Thus, 34% (one patient carried both traits) of unselected patients with deep venous thrombosis were carriers of an inherited prothrombotic disorder. To sum up, our results confirm the 20210 A allele of the prothrombin gene to be an important risk factor for venous thrombosis.
Notes
Comment In: Thromb Haemost. 1998 Feb;79(2):4449493605
PubMed ID
9308741 View in PubMed
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1664 records – page 1 of 167.