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9 records – page 1 of 1.

Abyssivirga alkaniphila gen. nov., sp. nov., an alkane-degrading, anaerobic bacterium from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent system, and emended descriptions of Natranaerovirga pectinivora and Natranaerovirga hydrolytica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275915
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2016 Apr;66(4):1724-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Anders Schouw
Tove Leiknes Eide
Runar Stokke
Rolf Birger Pedersen
Ida Helene Steen
Gunhild Bødtker
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2016 Apr;66(4):1724-34
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanes - metabolism
Arctic Regions
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Base Composition
Biodegradation, Environmental
Clostridiales - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Fatty Acids - chemistry
Glycolipids - chemistry
Hydrothermal Vents - microbiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Peptidoglycan - chemistry
Phospholipids - chemistry
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
A strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, syntrophic, alkane-degrading strain, L81T, was isolated from a biofilm sampled from a black smoker chimney at the Loki's Castle vent field. Cells were straight, rod-shaped, Gram-positive-staining and motile. Growth was observed at pH?6.2-9.5, 14-42?°C and 0.5-6?% (w/w) NaCl, with optima at pH?7.0-8.2, 37?°C and 3% (w/w) NaCl. Proteinaceous substrates, sugars, organic acids and hydrocarbons were utilized for growth. Thiosulfate was used as an external electron acceptor during growth on crude oil. Strain L81T was capable of syntrophic hydrocarbon degradation when co-cultured with a methanogenic archaeon, designated strain LG6, isolated from the same enrichment. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain L81T is affiliated with the family Lachnospiraceae, and is most closely related to the type strains of Natranaerovirga pectinivora (92?% sequence similarity) and Natranaerovirga hydrolytica (90%). The major cellular fatty acids of strain L81T were C15?:?0, anteiso-C15?:?0 and C16?:?0, and the profile was distinct from those of the species of the genus Natranaerovirga. The polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unidentified phospholipids, four unidentified glycolipids and two unidentified phosphoglycolipids. The G+C content of genomic DNA was determined to be 31.7?mol%. Based on our phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic results, strain L81T is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus of the family Lachnospiraceae, for which we propose the name Abyssivirga alkaniphila gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Abyssivirga alkaniphila is L81T (=DSM 29592T=JCM 30920T). We also provide emended descriptions of Natranaerovirga pectinivora and Natranaerovirga hydrolytica.
PubMed ID
26822139 View in PubMed
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Arctic hydrology during global warming at the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95711
Source
Nature. 2006 Aug 10;442(7103):671-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2006
Author
Pagani Mark
Pedentchouk Nikolai
Huber Matthew
Sluijs Appy
Schouten Stefan
Brinkhuis Henk
Damsté Jaap S Sinninghe
Dickens Gerald R
Author Affiliation
Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, PO Box 208109, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. mark.pagani@yale.edu
Source
Nature. 2006 Aug 10;442(7103):671-5
Date
Aug-10-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanes - metabolism
Arctic Regions
Biological Markers - analysis
Calcium Carbonate - analysis - metabolism
Carbon - metabolism
Carbon Isotopes
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Greenhouse Effect
History, Ancient
Humidity
Hydrogen - analysis - chemistry
Marine Biology
Oceans and Seas
Plants - metabolism
Rain
Seawater - analysis - chemistry
Sodium Chloride - analysis
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum represents a period of rapid, extreme global warming 55 million years ago, superimposed on an already warm world. This warming is associated with a severe shoaling of the ocean calcite compensation depth and a >2.5 per mil negative carbon isotope excursion in marine and soil carbonates. Together these observations indicate a massive release of 13C-depleted carbon and greenhouse-gas-induced warming. Recently, sediments were recovered from the central Arctic Ocean, providing the first opportunity to evaluate the environmental response at the North Pole at this time. Here we present stable hydrogen and carbon isotope measurements of terrestrial-plant- and aquatic-derived n-alkanes that record changes in hydrology, including surface water salinity and precipitation, and the global carbon cycle. Hydrogen isotope records are interpreted as documenting decreased rainout during moisture transport from lower latitudes and increased moisture delivery to the Arctic at the onset of the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum, consistent with predictions of poleward storm track migrations during global warming. The terrestrial-plant carbon isotope excursion (about -4.5 to -6 per mil) is substantially larger than those of marine carbonates. Previously, this offset was explained by the physiological response of plants to increases in surface humidity. But this mechanism is not an effective explanation in this wet Arctic setting, leading us to hypothesize that the true magnitude of the excursion--and associated carbon input--was greater than originally surmised. Greater carbon release and strong hydrological cycle feedbacks may help explain the maintenance of this unprecedented warmth.
Notes
Erratum In: Nature. 2006 Oct 5;443(7111):598
PubMed ID
16906647 View in PubMed
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[Comparative characteristics of microbial communities in two regions of natural oil seepage in Lake Baikal]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92701
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2008 May-Jun;(3):333-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pavlova O N
Zemskaia T I
Gorshkov A G
Kostornova T Ia
Khlystov O M
Parfenova V V
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2008 May-Jun;(3):333-40
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanes - metabolism
Biodegradation, Environmental
Fresh Water - microbiology
Oxidation-Reduction
Petroleum - metabolism
Siberia
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Microbial communities and hydrocarbon contents have been studied in two regions of natural oil seepage in Lake Baikal: (1) opposite the Bol'shaya Zelenovskaya River mouth (studied previously) and (2) near Cape Gorevoi Utes (discovered in 2005). The abundance of both heterotrophic and hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms is significantly higher in water samples from the first region, where the oil is biologically degraded. In the surface soil layer at stations located in the immediate vicinity of oil seepage site, the abundance of n-alkane-oxidizing microorganisms reaches 2000 cells/ml, and that of oil-oxidizing microorganisms reaches 2600 cells/ml. In water samples from near Cape Gorevoi Utes, the abundance of these groups of microorganisms does not exceed 190 and 500 cells/ml, respectively.
PubMed ID
18663971 View in PubMed
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High rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane, ethane and propane coupled to thiosulphate reduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264660
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015 Mar;22(5):3697-704
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Diego A Suarez-Zuluaga
Jan Weijma
Peer H A Timmers
Cees J N Buisman
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015 Mar;22(5):3697-704
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanes - metabolism
Anaerobiosis
Denmark
Ethane - metabolism
Geologic Sediments - microbiology
Germany
Methane - metabolism
Oxidation-Reduction
Propane - metabolism
Sulfates - metabolism
Sulfur-Reducing Bacteria - growth & development - metabolism
Thiosulfates - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - metabolism
Abstract
Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to sulphate reduction and the use of ethane and propane as electron donors by sulphate-reducing bacteria represent new opportunities for the treatment of streams contaminated with sulphur oxyanions. However, growth of microbial sulphate-reducing populations with methane, propane or butane is extremely slow, which hampers research and development of bioprocesses based on these conversions. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the growth rate with possible alternative terminal electron acceptors such as thiosulphate and elemental sulphur may be higher, which would facilitate future research. Here, we investigate the use of these electron acceptors for oxidation of methane, ethane and propane, with marine sediment as inoculum. Mixed marine sediments originating from Aarhus Bay (Denmark) and Eckernförde Bay (Germany) were cultivated anaerobically at a pH between 7.2 and 7.8 and a temperature of 15 °C in the presence of methane, ethane and propane and various sulphur electron acceptors. The sulphide production rates in the conditions with methane, ethane and propane with sulphate were respectively 2.3, 2.2 and 1.8 µmol S L(-1) day(-1). For sulphur, no reduction was demonstrated. For thiosulphate, the sulphide production rates were up to 50 times higher compared to those of sulphate, with 86.2, 90.7 and 108.1 µmol S L(-1) day(-1) for methane, ethane and propane respectively. This sulphide production was partly due to disproportionation, 50 % for ethane but only 7 and 14 % for methane and propane respectively. The oxidation of the alkanes in the presence of thiosulphate was confirmed by carbon dioxide production. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of thiosulphate use as electron acceptor with ethane and propane as electron donors. Additionally, these results indicate that thiosulphate is a promising electron acceptor to increase start-up rates for sulphate-reducing bioprocesses coupled to short-chain alkane oxidation.
PubMed ID
25256585 View in PubMed
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Oil type and temperature dependent biodegradation dynamics - Combining chemical and microbial community data through multivariate analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300060
Source
BMC Microbiol. 2018 08 07; 18(1):83
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-07-2018
Author
Deni Ribicic
Kelly Marie McFarlin
Roman Netzer
Odd Gunnar Brakstad
Anika Winkler
Mimmi Throne-Holst
Trond Røvik Størseth
Author Affiliation
SINTEF Ocean, Environment and New Resources, Brattørkaia 17C, 7010, Trondheim, Norway. deni.ribicic@sintef.no.
Source
BMC Microbiol. 2018 08 07; 18(1):83
Date
08-07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Alkanes - metabolism
Bacteria - classification - genetics - metabolism
Biodegradation, Environmental
Cold Temperature
DNA, Bacterial
Hydrocarbons - metabolism
Lipids
Microbiota
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Oils - analysis - metabolism
Petroleum - metabolism
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Seawater - microbiology
Temperature
Water Pollutants, Chemical
Abstract
This study investigates a comparative multivariate approach for studying the biodegradation of chemically dispersed oil. The rationale for this approach lies in the inherent complexity of the data and challenges associated with comparing multiple experiments with inconsistent sampling points, with respect to inferring correlations and visualizing multiple datasets with numerous variables. We aim to identify novel correlations among microbial community composition, the chemical change of individual petroleum hydrocarbons, oil type and temperature by creating modelled datasets from inconsistent sampling time points. Four different incubation experiments were conducted with freshly collected Norwegian seawater and either Grane and Troll oil dispersed with Corexit 9500. Incubations were conducted at two different temperatures (5 °C and 13 °C) over a period of 64 days.
PCA analysis of modelled chemical datasets and calculated half-lives revealed differences in the biodegradation of individual hydrocarbons among temperatures and oil types. At 5 °C, most n-alkanes biodegraded faster in heavy Grane oil compared to light Troll oil. PCA analysis of modelled microbial community datasets reveal differences between temperature and oil type, especially at low temperature. For both oils, Colwelliaceae and Oceanospirillaceae were more prominent in the colder incubation (5 °C) than the warmer (13 °C). Overall, Colwelliaceae, Oceanospirillaceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Alteromonadaceae and Piscirickettsiaceae consistently dominated the microbial community at both temperatures and in both oil types. Other families known to include oil-degrading bacteria were also identified, such as Alcanivoracaceae, Methylophilaceae, Sphingomonadaceae and Erythrobacteraceae, but they were all present in dispersed oil incubations at a low abundance (
PubMed ID
30086723 View in PubMed
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Sterol glucosyltransferases have different functional roles in Pichia pastoris and Yarrowia lipolytica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9601
Source
Cell Biol Int. 2003;27(11):947-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Oleh V Stasyk
Taras Y Nazarko
Olena G Stasyk
Olena S Krasovska
Dirk Warnecke
Jean-Marc Nicaud
James M Cregg
Andrei A Sibirny
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cell Biology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Drahomanov Street 14/16, 79005, Lviv, Ukraine
Source
Cell Biol Int. 2003;27(11):947-52
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanes - metabolism
Cells, Cultured
Comparative Study
Ethanol - metabolism
Glucose - metabolism
Glucosyltransferases - metabolism - physiology
Methanol - metabolism
Mutation - genetics
Peroxisomes - enzymology
Phagocytosis - physiology
Pichia - enzymology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sterols - metabolism
Time Factors
Vacuoles - enzymology
Yarrowia - enzymology - genetics
Abstract
Mutants of the methanol-utilizing yeast Pichia pastoris and the alkane-utilizing yeast Yarrowia lipolytica defective in the orthologue of UGT51 (encoding sterol glucosyltransferase) were isolated and compared. These mutants do not contain the specific ergosterol derivate, ergosterol glucoside. We observed that the P. pastoris UGT51 gene is required for pexophagy, the process by which peroxisomes containing methanol-metabolizing enzymes are selectively shipped to and degraded in the vacuole upon shifting methanol-grown cells of this yeast to glucose or ethanol. PpUGT51 is also required for other vacuole related processes. In contrast, the Y. lipolytica UGT51 gene is required for utilization of decane, but not for pexophagy. Thus, sterol glucosyltransferases play different functional roles in P. pastoris and Y. lipolytica.
PubMed ID
14585290 View in PubMed
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[Study on the Lake Baikal microbial community in the areas of the natural oil seeps]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92702
Source
Prikl Biokhim Mikrobiol. 2008 May-Jun;44(3):319-23
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pavlova O N
Zemskaia T I
Gorshkov A G
Parfenova V V
Suslova M Iu
Khlystov O M
Source
Prikl Biokhim Mikrobiol. 2008 May-Jun;44(3):319-23
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanes - metabolism
Bacteria - growth & development - isolation & purification - metabolism
Fresh Water - microbiology
Models, Biological
Petroleum - metabolism
Siberia
Time Factors
Water Microbiology
Abstract
We studied the composition of a natural microbial community, the distribution of different groups of microorganisms (including those able to degrade oil hydrocarbons) within the areas of natural oil seeps in the Lake Baikal. It was revealed that, in the bottom sediments, the oil-degrading microorganisms dominating the community have included the bacteria of g. Bacillus, while in the water column, dominating microbes are presented by species of genera Rhodococcus Pseudomonas, and Micrococcus. Under the conditions of the model experiment, the potential activity of Baikal microbes towards utilization of n-alcanes has been assessed. Under such conditions it was shown that the concentration of n-alcanes decreases to 60% during 20 days of the experiment (the initial oil concentration was 0.5 mg/l, i.e., ten maximal permissible concentrations, MPC).
PubMed ID
18663956 View in PubMed
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[The role of previous adaptation to paraffin in the ability of several microscopic fungi to oxidize n-decane and n-hexadecane]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13519
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1970 Jan-Feb;32(1):39-44
Publication Type
Article

9 records – page 1 of 1.