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45 records – page 1 of 5.

Algae feeding in mice: preliminary observations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297216
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report AAL-TDR-62-38.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1962
Author
Rehkemper, J.A.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report AAL-TDR-62-38.
Date
June 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Animals
Mice
Algae
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Source
Science. 2002 Aug 30;297(5586):1494-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-2002
Author
Kaiser Jocelyn
Source
Science. 2002 Aug 30;297(5586):1494-6
Date
Aug-30-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algae
Antarctic Regions
Cold Climate
Diatoms
Ecosystem
Evolution
Geologic sediments
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Ice
Time
Notes
Erratum In: Science 2002 Sep 20;297(5589):1996
PubMed ID
12202815 View in PubMed
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Climate-driven regime shifts in the biological communities of arctic lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95809
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Mar 22;102(12):4397-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-22-2005
Author
Smol John P
Wolfe Alexander P
Birks H John B
Douglas Marianne S V
Jones Vivienne J
Korhola Atte
Pienitz Reinhard
Rühland Kathleen
Sorvari Sanna
Antoniades Dermot
Brooks Stephen J
Fallu Marie-Andrée
Hughes Mike
Keatley Bronwyn E
Laing Tamsin E
Michelutti Neal
Nazarova Larisa
Nyman Marjut
Paterson Andrew M
Perren Bianca
Quinlan Roberto
Rautio Milla
Saulnier-Talbot Emilie
Siitonen Susanna
Solovieva Nadia
Weckström Jan
Author Affiliation
Paleoecological Environmental Assessment and Research Laboratory, Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6. smolj@biology.queensu.ca
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Mar 22;102(12):4397-402
Date
Mar-22-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algae - isolation & purification
Animals
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
Cold Climate
Ecosystem
Fresh Water
Greenhouse Effect
Invertebrates
Time Factors
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Fifty-five paleolimnological records from lakes in the circumpolar Arctic reveal widespread species changes and ecological reorganizations in algae and invertebrate communities since approximately anno Domini 1850. The remoteness of these sites, coupled with the ecological characteristics of taxa involved, indicate that changes are primarily driven by climate warming through lengthening of the summer growing season and related limnological changes. The widespread distribution and similar character of these changes indicate that the opportunity to study arctic ecosystems unaffected by human influences may have disappeared.
PubMed ID
15738395 View in PubMed
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Community-level analysis of psbA gene sequences and irgarol tolerance in marine periphyton.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90767
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2009 Feb;75(4):897-906
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Eriksson K M
Clarke A K
Franzen L-G
Kuylenstierna M.
Martinez K.
Blanck H.
Author Affiliation
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 461, SE-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. martin.eriksson@dpes.gu.se
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2009 Feb;75(4):897-906
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algae - drug effects - enzymology - genetics
Amino Acid Sequence
Amino Acid Substitution
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology
Cyanobacteria - drug effects - enzymology - genetics
DNA, Algal - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Drug Tolerance
Molecular Sequence Data
Mutation, Missense
Photosystem II Protein Complex - genetics
Seawater - microbiology
Sequence Alignment
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sweden
Triazines - pharmacology
Abstract
This study analyzes psbA gene sequences, predicted D1 protein sequences, species relative abundance, and pollution-induced community tolerance in marine periphyton communities exposed to the antifouling compound Irgarol 1051. The mechanism of action of Irgarol is the inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport at photosystem II by binding to the D1 protein. The metagenome of the communities was used to produce clone libraries containing fragments of the psbA gene encoding the D1 protein. Community tolerance was quantified with a short-term test for the inhibition of photosynthesis. The communities were established in a continuous flow of natural seawater through microcosms with or without added Irgarol. The selection pressure from Irgarol resulted in an altered species composition and an inducted community tolerance to Irgarol. Moreover, there was a very high diversity in the psbA gene sequences in the periphyton, and the composition of psbA and D1 fragments within the communities was dramatically altered by increased Irgarol exposure. Even though tolerance to this type of compound in land plants often depends on a single amino acid substitution (Ser(264)-->Gly) in the D1 protein, this was not the case for marine periphyton species. Instead, the tolerance mechanism likely involves increased degradation of D1. When we compared sequences from low and high Irgarol exposure, differences in nonconserved amino acids were found only in the so-called PEST region of D1, which is involved in regulating its degradation. Our results suggest that environmental contamination with Irgarol has led to selection for high-turnover D1 proteins in marine periphyton communities at the west coast of Sweden.
PubMed ID
19088321 View in PubMed
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[Data on the nutritional spectrum of black fly larvae]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62297
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1988 Jan-Feb;(1):78-81
Publication Type
Article
Source
Hydrobiologia. 21(1-2):90-124.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
Author
Irenee-Marie, Fr.
Hilliard, Douglas K.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Hydrobiologia. 21(1-2):90-124.
Date
1963
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Algae
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Development of a methodology for assessing the environmental impact of radioactivity in Northern Marine environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86689
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2006 Oct;52(10):1127-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Brown J E
Hosseini A.
Børretzen P.
Thørring H.
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Grini naeringspark 13, N-1332, Østerås, Norway.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2006 Oct;52(10):1127-37
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algae
Animals
Arctic Regions
Environment
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Marine Biology - methods
Radioactivity
Radioisotopes - analysis
Radiometry - veterinary
Abstract
The requirement to assess the impacts of radioactivity in the environment explicitly and transparently is now generally accepted by the scientific community. A recently developed methodology for achieving this end for marine ecosystems is presented within this paper. With its clear relationship to an overarching system, the marine impact assessment is built around components of environmental transfer, ecodosimetry and radiobiological effects appraisal relying on the use of "reference organisms". Concentration factors (CFs), dynamic models and, in cases where parameters are missing, allometry have been employed in the consideration of radionuclide transfer. Dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) have been derived for selected flora and fauna using, inter alia, dose attenuation and chord distribution functions. The calculated dose-rates can be contextualised through comparison with dose-rates arising from natural background and chronic dose-rates at which biological effects have been observed in selected "umbrella" endpoints.
PubMed ID
16914169 View in PubMed
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Development of microalgae communities in the Phytotelmata of allochthonous populations of Sarracenia purpurea (Sarraceniaceae).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80060
Source
Plant Biol (Stuttg). 2006 Nov;8(6):849-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Gebühr C.
Pohlon E.
Schmidt A R
Küsel K.
Author Affiliation
Limnology Research Group, Institute of Ecology, Friedrich Schiller University, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 10, 07745 Jena, Germany.
Source
Plant Biol (Stuttg). 2006 Nov;8(6):849-60
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algae - growth & development
Animals
Bacteria - growth & development
Biomass
Ecosystem
Fresh Water
Mastigophora - growth & development
Protozoa - growth & development
Rotifera - growth & development
Sarraceniaceae - classification - physiology
Abstract
The phytotelmata of the North American pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea are colonised by a great variety of aquatic organisms and, thus, provide an ideal model to study trophic interactions in small freshwater ecosystems. Although algae are discussed as a potential food source for predators, little is known about the structure of algae coenoses in pitchers of S. purpurea. This study aims to elucidate temporal shifts in the algae community structure in pitchers of an allochthonous population of S. purpurea in Saxony, Germany. A total of 78 algae taxa was found in the pitchers. Mean algae abundances in new and old pitchers were similar (2.6 x 10(5) and 2.3 x 10(5) algae ml(-1), respectively). Taxa from the orders Chlamydomonadales, Chlorococcales, and Ochromonadales were the primary colonisers. With increasing age of the pitchers the filamentous green algae from the order Klebsormidiales became more abundant. In contrast, pennate diatoms dominated the algae coenoses in the fen. Algae community structure in vase-shaped 50 ml Greiner tubes was similar to those of natural pitchers. Differences in the temporal patterns of algae coenoses in individual pitchers suggested a colonisation of the pitchers by algae via trapped insects, air and rain water rather than via the surrounding fen. Biomass of algae approximated 0.3 mg C ml(-1), which corresponds to 82.8 % of the living biomass (bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates, algae, protozoans and rotifers). Rotifers were abundant in new pitchers; nematodes and mites were seldom found in all pitchers. A similar qualitative and quantitative composition of the aquatic biocoenoses was observed in pitchers of another allochthonous S. purpurea population growing in Blekinge, Sweden. Biomass of algae represented nearly one quarter of the total organic matter content in the pitchers. Thus, nitrogen and phosphorus compounds present in the algae biomass might be used by the carnivorous S. purpurea plant as additional food source in allochthonous populations in Europe lacking top predators.
PubMed ID
17066365 View in PubMed
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Diversity and distribution of marine microbial eukaryotes in the Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95732
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2006 May;72(5):3085-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Lovejoy C.
Massana R.
Pedrós-Alió C.
Author Affiliation
Québec Océan and Département de Biologie, Université Laval, Quebec, QC, Canada G1K 7P4. connie.lovejoy@bio.ulaval.ca
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2006 May;72(5):3085-95
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Animals
Arctic Regions
Copepoda - classification - genetics
Diatoms - classification - genetics
Eukaryotic Cells - classification
Gene Library
Genes, rRNA
Hydrozoa - classification - genetics
Mastigophora - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Molecular Sequence Data
Oceans and Seas
Phylogeny
Polychaeta - classification - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Seawater - microbiology - parasitology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
We analyzed microbial eukaryote diversity in perennially cold arctic marine waters by using 18S rRNA gene clone libraries. Samples were collected during concurrent oceanographic missions to opposite sides of the Arctic Ocean Basin and encompassed five distinct water masses. Two deep water Arctic Ocean sites and the convergence of the Greenland, Norwegian, and Barents Seas were sampled from 28 August to 2 September 2002. An additional sample was obtained from the Beaufort Sea (Canada) in early October 2002. The ribotypes were diverse, with different communities among sites and between the upper mixed layer and just below the halocline. Eukaryotes from the remote Canada Basin contained new phylotypes belonging to the radiolarian orders Acantharea, Polycystinea, and Taxopodida. A novel group within the photosynthetic stramenopiles was also identified. One sample closest to the interior of the Canada Basin yielded only four major taxa, and all but two of the sequences recovered belonged to the polar diatom Fragilariopsis and a radiolarian. Overall, 42% of the sequences were
PubMed ID
16672445 View in PubMed
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Ecosystem and human health assessment to define environmental management strategies: The case of long-term human impacts on an Arctic lake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81031
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Oct 1;369(1-3):1-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2006
Author
Moiseenko T I
Voinov A A
Megorsky V V
Gashkina N A
Kudriavtseva L P
Vandish O I
Sharov A N
Sharova Yu
Koroleva I N
Author Affiliation
Water Problems Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gubkina 3, GSP-1, Moscow, 119991, Russia. tatyana@aqua.laser.ru
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Oct 1;369(1-3):1-20
Date
Oct-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algae
Animals
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Fishes
Fresh Water - analysis
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Hematologic Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Invertebrates
Kidney Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Liver Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Metals, Heavy - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Phytoplankton
Russia
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Water Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control
Water Supply - analysis
Zooplankton
Abstract
There are rich deposits of mineral and fossil natural resources in the Arctic, which make this region very attractive for extracting industries. Their operations have immediate and vast consequences for ecological systems, which are particularly vulnerable in this region. We are developing a management strategy for Arctic watersheds impacted by industrial production. The case study is Lake Imandra watershed (Murmansk oblast, Russia) that has exceptionally high levels of economic development and large numbers of people living there. We track the impacts of toxic pollution on ecosystem health and then--human health. Three periods are identified: (a) natural, pre-industrial state; (b) disturbed, under rapid economic development; and (c) partial recovery, during recent economic meltdown. The ecosystem is shown to transform into a qualitatively new state, which is still different from the original natural state, even after toxic loadings have substantially decreased. Fish disease where analyzed to produce and integral evaluation of ecosystem health. Accumulation of heavy metals in fish is correlated with etiology of many diseases. Dose-effect relationships are between integral water quality indices and ecosystem health indicators clearly demonstrates that existing water quality standards adopted in Russia are inadequate for Arctic regions. Health was also poor for people drinking water from the Lake. Transport of heavy metals from drinking water, into human organs, and their effect on liver and kidney diseases shows the close connection between ecosystem and human health. A management system is outlined that is based on feedback from indices of ecosystem and human health and control over economic production and/or the amount of toxic loading produced. We argue that prospects for implementation of such a system are quite bleak at this time, and that more likely we will see a continued depopulation of these Northern regions.
PubMed ID
16920180 View in PubMed
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45 records – page 1 of 5.