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Acute interstitial pneumonia in mink kits: experimental reproduction of the disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4624
Source
Vet Pathol. 1986 Sep;23(5):579-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1986
Author
S. Alexandersen
Source
Vet Pathol. 1986 Sep;23(5):579-88
Date
Sep-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aleutian Mink Disease - pathology
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus - isolation & purification
Animals
Female
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Lung - pathology - ultrastructure
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Mink
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - pathology - veterinary
Pulmonary Fibrosis - pathology - veterinary
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Organ homogenates from kits that died of interstitial pneumonia were inoculated into adult Aleutian disease virus (ADV)-negative mink and shown to contain infectious ADV. Acute interstitial pneumonia was experimentally reproduced with the organ homogenate but only by inoculation of newborn kits born from ADV-negative dams. Older kits and kits from ADV-positive dams did not develop interstitial pneumonia, but later developed the classic form of Aleutian disease. Electron microscopic examination was done on purified suspensions of defined ADV isolates and on purified organ homogenates from kits with spontaneous or experimental interstitial pneumonia. In kits from both groups a virus, morphologically resembling the defined ADV isolates, was demonstrated. Findings of intranuclear inclusion bodies and intranuclear ADV antigen in alveolar type-II cells in affected lungs and the lack of immunologically mediated lesions suggest that lung lesions result from primary viral injury to alveolar type-II cells. Experiments also showed that infection of dams with ADV before pregnancy decreased the number of kits per mated dam and infection with ADV in mid-pregnancy caused fetal death, fetal resorption, or abortion.
PubMed ID
3022453 View in PubMed
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Alaska public health improvement partnership : letter of intent to apply for a grant under the Robert Wood Johnson / W.K. Kellogg Foundations' initiative : turning point, collaborating for a new century in public health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289735
Source
Juneau : Alaska Division of public Health. 1 v.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1997
Source
Juneau : Alaska Division of public Health. 1 v.
Date
1997
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Public Health
Health planning
Medical policy
Alaska Public Health Improvement Partnership
Aleutians East Borough (Alaska)
Notes
ALASKA RA447.A4A46 1997
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Aleutian disease serology, protein electrophoresis, and pathology of the European mink (Mustela lutreola) from Navarra, Spain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91885
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2008 Sep;39(3):305-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Sánchez-Migallón Guzmán David
Carvajal Ana
García-Marín Juan F
Ferreras María C
Pérez Valentín
Mitchell Mark
Urra Fermín
Ceña Juan C
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-8410, USA.
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2008 Sep;39(3):305-13
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Aleutian Mink Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus - immunology
Animals
Animals, Wild - microbiology - virology
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Cause of Death
Conservation of Natural Resources
Cross-Sectional Studies
Distemper - epidemiology - mortality
Distemper Virus, Canine
Female
Male
Mink
Mycoses - epidemiology - mortality - veterinary
Seasons
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
The European mink, Mustela lutreola, has suffered a dramatic decline in Europe during the 20th century and is one of the most endangered carnivores in the world. The subpopulation of European mink from Navarra, Spain, estimated to number approximately 420, represents approximately two thirds of the total number of mink in Spain. Aleutian Disease Virus (ADV) is a parvovirus with a high degree of variability that can infect a broad range of mustelid hosts. The pathogenesis of this virus in small carnivores is variable and can be influenced by both host factors (e.g., species, American mink genotype, and immune status) and viral strain. A cross-sectional study was conducted during the pre-reproductive period of February-March 2004 and 2005 and the postreproductive period of September-December 2004. Mink were intensively trapped along seven rivers that were representative of the European mink habitat in Navarra. Antibody counter immunoelectrophoresis against ADV was performed on 84 European mink blood samples. All the samples were negative. Protein electrophoresis was performed on 93 plasma samples. Nine of those samples (9.6%) had gamma globulin levels exceeding 20% of the total plasma protein. Complete necropsies were performed on 23 cadavers of European mink collected in the area between 2000 and 2005. Seventeen of the mink (74%) had traumatic and hemorrhagic lesions compatible with vehicular impact injuries. Although there were no histopathologic lesions associated with ADV, this study documents the first description of a naturally occurring canine distemper virus infection in a European mink. In addition, pulmonary adiaspiromycosis in three European mink from Spain was reported.
PubMed ID
18816991 View in PubMed
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Aleutians & Pribilofs Regional Health Profile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301049
Source
Alaska Native Epidemiology Center. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 2012
Aleutians & Pribilofs Regional Health Profile     The Alaska Na ve Epidemiology Center 4000 Ambassador Drive, C ‐ DCHS  Anchorage, Alaska 99508  Phone: 907‐729‐4567   Fax: 907‐729‐4569   E‐mail:  anepicenter@anthc.org  Website:  h p://www.anthctoday.org/epicenter/  September 2012 The
  1 document  
Source
Alaska Native Epidemiology Center. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium.
Date
September 2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1483221
Keywords
Alaska
Pribilofs
Aleutians
Demographics
Mortality
Morbidity
Health care
Behavioral health
Documents
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Application of real-time PCR to detect Aleutian Mink Disease Virus on environmental farm sources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262977
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2014 Oct 10;173(3-4):355-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-2014
Author
Alberto Prieto
José Manuel Díaz-Cao
Ricardo Fernández-Antonio
Rosario Panadero
Pablo Díaz
Ceferino López
Patrocinio Morrondo
Pablo Díez-Baños
Gonzalo Fernández
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2014 Oct 10;173(3-4):355-9
Date
Oct-10-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aleutian Mink Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus - genetics - isolation & purification
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Mink
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods - veterinary
Regression Analysis
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
The Aleutian Mink Virus (AMDV) causes the Aleutian Mink Disease (AMD) or Mink Plasmacytosis, a disease responsible of high economic losses for industry worldwide. Despite there is evidence of the environmental persistence of the virus, there is not literature on the detection of this virus in environmental samples in farms and this fact would have great importance in the control programs of the disease. In order to detect contamination caused by AMDV on farms, several environmental samples were taken and examined using qPCR. 93.9% of samples taken from farms confirmed to be infected tested positive. The virus was also detected on a farm which, despite having no previous positive results, was sharing personnel with an infected farm. All samples taken from AMD-free farms tested negative, including a farm where an eradication procedure by stamping out had been performed during the preceding months. Higher contamination levels were observed in samples from those surfaces in direct contact with animals. These results are the first demonstration of environmental contamination in farms, hitherto suggested by epidemiological evidences, caused by AMDV on surfaces, furniture and equipments inside mink farms. qPCR is an useful tool for evaluating the spread of AMDV into the environment, and it may have important applications within the disease control programs.
PubMed ID
25183237 View in PubMed
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The capsid proteins of Aleutian mink disease virus activate caspases and are specifically cleaved during infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146350
Source
J Virol. 2010 Mar;84(6):2687-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Fang Cheng
Aaron Yun Chen
Sonja M Best
Marshall E Bloom
David Pintel
Jianming Qiu
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics and Immunology, Mail Stop 3029, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, KS 66160, USA.
Source
J Virol. 2010 Mar;84(6):2687-96
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aleutian Mink Disease - virology
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus - metabolism
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Capsid Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Caspases - genetics - metabolism
Cats
Cell Line
Enzyme Activation
Humans
Isoenzymes - genetics - metabolism
Mink - virology
Molecular Sequence Data
Recombinant Fusion Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Temperature
Abstract
Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) is currently the only known member of the genus Amdovirus in the family Parvoviridae. It is the etiological agent of Aleutian disease of mink. We have previously shown that a small protein with a molecular mass of approximately 26 kDa was present during AMDV infection and following transfection of capsid expression constructs (J. Qiu, F. Cheng, L. R. Burger, and D. Pintel, J. Virol. 80:654-662, 2006). In this study, we report that the capsid proteins were specifically cleaved at aspartic acid residue 420 (D420) during virus infection, resulting in the previously observed cleavage product. Mutation of a single amino acid residue at D420 abolished the specific cleavage. Expression of the capsid proteins alone in Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells reproduced the cleavage of the capsid proteins in virus infection. More importantly, capsid protein expression alone induced active caspases, of which caspase-10 was the most active. Active caspases, in turn, cleaved capsid proteins in vivo. Our results also showed that active caspase-7 specifically cleaved capsid proteins at D420 in vitro. These results suggest that viral capsid proteins alone induce caspase activation, resulting in cleavage of capsid proteins. We also provide evidence that AMDV mutants resistant to caspase-mediated capsid cleavage increased virus production approximately 3- to 5-fold in CrFK cells compared to that produced from the parent virus AMDV-G at 37 degrees C but not at 31.8 degrees C. Collectively, our results indicate that caspase activity plays multiple roles in AMDV infection and that cleavage of the capsid proteins might have a role in regulating persistent infection of AMDV.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20042496 View in PubMed
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Source
Curr Opin Hematol. 2008 Jan;15(1):22-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Jerry Kaplan
Ivana De Domenico
Diane McVey Ward
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine, 30 N. 1900 E., Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA.
Source
Curr Opin Hematol. 2008 Jan;15(1):22-9
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aleutian Mink Disease - genetics - pathology
Animals
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Chediak-Higashi Syndrome - complications - genetics - pathology - surgery
Conserved Sequence
Disease Models, Animal
Disease Progression
Genes, Recessive
Hemorrhagic Disorders - etiology
Humans
Lymphoproliferative Disorders - etiology
Membrane Fusion - physiology
Mice
Mice, Mutant Strains
Mink
Multigene Family
Opportunistic Infections - etiology
Species Specificity
Transport Vesicles - metabolism - pathology
Vesicular Transport Proteins - deficiency - genetics - physiology
Abstract
Chediak-Higashi syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive disorder, was described over 50 years ago. Patients show hypopigmentation, recurrent infections, mild coagulation defects and varying neurologic problems. Treatment is bone marrow transplant, which is effective in treating the hematologic and immune defects, however the neurologic problems persist. The CHS1/LYST gene was identified over 10 years ago and homologous CHS1/LYST genes are present in all eukaryotes. This review will discuss the advances made in understanding the clinical aspects of the syndrome and the function of CHS1/LYST/Beige.
Clinical reports of Chediak-Higashi syndrome have identified mutations throughout the CHS1/LYST gene. The nature of the mutation can be a predictor of the severity of the disease. Over the past decade the CHS1/LYST family of proteins has been analyzed using model organisms, two-hybrid analysis, overexpression phenotypes and dominant negatives. These studies suggest that the CHS1/LYST protein is involved in either vesicle fusion or fission.
Although CHS is a rare disease, the Chediak-like family of proteins is providing insight into the regulation of vesicle trafficking. Understanding the basic mechanisms that govern vesicle trafficking will provide essential information regarding how loss of CHS1/LYST affects hematologic, immunologic and neurologic processes.
PubMed ID
18043242 View in PubMed
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102 records – page 1 of 11.