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Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation: Looking back at twenty years of service

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96203
Publication Type
Report
Date
1993
Author
Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation
Date
1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Native Service
Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation (BBAHC)
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Aleut
Athapaskan
Bristol Bay region
Cannery doctors
Christianity
Community health aide program (CHAP)
Dillingham
Health aides
Influenza-measles epidemic
Iliamna Lake region
Indian Health Care Improvement Act of 1976
Indian Health Service
Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975
Kanakanak Hospital
Midlevel practitioners
Missionaries
Mortality rates
Nushagak River region
PL 93-638
Public health nurses
Smallpox
Traditional Native healers
Tuberculosis
Yup'ik
Abstract
The Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation (BBAHC) was the first tribal organization in the United States to use a P.L. 93-638 contract to manage and operate an Indian Health Service Unit. BBAHC was formed on behalf of 32 village tribes in 1973 and began managing and operating Kanakanak Hospital and Bristol Bay Area Service Unit in 1980. Twenty years have passed since the corporation took on its mission to provide health care programs to Native and other residents of Bristol Bay.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 96203.
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Source
Journal of the American Medical Association. 1951 Jan;145(2):108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1951
Source
Journal of the American Medical Association. 1951 Jan;145(2):108
Date
Jan-1951
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Alcoholism
Alaska
Aleuts
Eskimos
Homicides
Indians
Suicides
Tuberculosis
White population
Abstract
Dr. Jack C. Haldeman, medical officer in charge of the Arctic Health Research Center, said in an address before the recent Alaskan Science Conference that (on the basis of reported causes of death) accidents, alcoholism, suicides and homicides, as a group, accounted for 32 per cent of the deaths in Alaska among the white population during the five year period ending December 1949. By comparison, in 1948 only 9 per cent of all deaths in the United States as a whole were attributed to these causes. Alcoholism was reported as the immediate cause of death among the white population 20 times as often in Alaska as in the States and eight times as often among the nonwhite group. Tuberculosis was reported as the cause of death on 43 per cent of all death certificates for Indians, Eskimos and Aleuts in Alaska in 1946, 10 times as often as in the United States as a whole, and the combined pneumonia-influenza death rate was almost four times that of the States.
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Observations on the treatment of tuberculosis in the Alaskan Native during the transition period 1955-1957

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100785
Source
Unpublished paper from 1965 Anchorage conference "Rational Therapy and Control of Tuberculosis." 20 pp. & appendices.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1965
  1 document  
Author
Meyer, ED
Source
Unpublished paper from 1965 Anchorage conference "Rational Therapy and Control of Tuberculosis." 20 pp. & appendices.
Date
1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
1012070
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaskan Native
Aleuts
Eskimos
Indians
Infection
Isoniazid (INH)
Para-aminosalycylic acid (PAS)
Tb
Territorial Legislature
Tuberculosis
Abstract
The period from July 1955 to July 1957 could be called a transition period in the treatment of Tb among the Alaskan Natives. On the one hand, the massive tuberculosis problem existed seemingly unchangeable and unsolvable. Yet after these two years or so there were definite signs and concrete figures to show the first real breech in at least a century.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 100785.
Documents

MeyerObservationsOnTreatmentofTBinAlaska.pdf

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Source
Public Health Reports. 1953 Jan;68(1):23-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1953
  1 website  
Author
Weiss, E.S.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Public Health Reports. 1953 Jan;68(1):23-27
Date
Jan-1953
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Aleuts
BCG
Eskimos
Indians
PPD
Tuberculin sensitivity
White civilian population
Tuberculosis
Abstract
The 90-percent increase in the white civilian population of Alaska between 1939 and 1950 was largely due to the entry of employable adults and their children into the Anchorage and Fairbanks areas. Since many of these newer residents, as well as some of the older ones, return to the States for medical care, especially when extended hospitalization is involved, tuberculosis mortality statistics are of little value with respect to this group. Rejecting mortality statistics as an index of prevalence leaves two practical measures: mass X-ray survey results and tuberculin sensitivity data. Although records of both are available, the latter provide greater coverage numerically and geographically. They are a byproduct of an extensive BCG program of the Alaska Department of Health. Since age-specific tuberculin sensitivity rates are among the most useful measures of the prevalence of infection, the results of tuberculin tests have been tabulated and analyzed for specific racial groups in designated geographical areas in order to achieve a preliminary definition of the tuberculosis problem.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1777.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 636.
Online Resources
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