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The infectiousness of rubella and the possibility of reinfection

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature371
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1966 Jul;56(7):1082-1087
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1966
  1 website  
Author
Brody, J.A.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1966 Jul;56(7):1082-1087
Date
Jul-1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Aleut
Epidemic
Eskimo
St. George
St. Paul
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Measles - epidemiology - immunology
Middle Aged
Rubella - epidemiology - immunology
Abstract
A series of rubella epidemics occurred in Alaska in 1963-1964 in isolated Eskimo and Aleut communities in which the disease had been absent for at least 20 years. Details of one of these epidemicsappear elsewhere. In this communication, an attempt will be madeto analyze the epidemiological implications of these outbreaks. Several controversial concepts will be expressed concerning the infectiousness of rubella as opposed to measles and the problemof subclinical and second infections with rubella.
Notes
Alaska Medical Library - From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1963.
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 1961 Sep;50:444-5213764326
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1964 Feb;23:153-914117317
Cites: JAMA. 1965 Feb 22;191:619-2314242417
Cites: JAMA. 1965 Feb 22;191:624-614245933
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 806.
Online Resources
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