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A 2-year follow-up of 120 Swedish female alcoholics treated early in their drinking career: prediction of drinking outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10097
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1586-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
B. Haver
L. Dahlgren
A. Willander
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Alcohol and Drug Research Section, Stockholm, Sweden. brit.haver@psyk.uib.no
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1586-93
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - therapy
Biological Markers
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Patient Dropouts
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: One hundred twenty women alcoholics recruited to a treatment program called EWA (Early Treatment for Women With Alcohol Addiction) were studied. The selected women were not previously treated for alcohol abuse. METHODS: The women were followed up by use of a structured personal interview, biomarkers sensitive for alcohol abuse (i.e., glutamyl transpeptidase), and questionnaires, by using defined criteria for abstinence, social drinking, satisfactory drinking outcome, and unsatisfactory drinking outcome. RESULTS: Drinking outcome was good (i.e., total abstinence, social drinking, or satisfactory drinking outcome) for 67% of the women during the total follow-up time, by use of strict criteria for relapse. The results were corroborated by the biomarkers. Similar results were reported from two previously studied groups of women from the same department. However, the frequency of abstinence was higher and social drinking was significantly lower among this sample of women. Daily drinking, the use of sedatives, and a long duration of pretreatment alcohol abuse predicted an unfavorable outcome. However, a long duration of outpatient treatment predicted a good outcome, whereas treatment dropout was related to an unsatisfactory drinking outcome. A majority of the women (96%) rated the treatment experience and the treatment program favorably. The overall good results might reflect the selection of the subjects studied. CONCLUSIONS: Improving treatment program adherence would probably improve outcome for the women with an unsatisfactory drinking outcome.
PubMed ID
11707633 View in PubMed
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Source
Lakartidningen. 1976 Sep 1;73(36):2892-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1976
Author
G. Mellbin
Source
Lakartidningen. 1976 Sep 1;73(36):2892-3
Date
Sep-1-1976
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Substance-Related Disorders - therapy
Sweden
PubMed ID
966857 View in PubMed
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[A-clinics and treatment of drug addicts]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10817
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Aug 30;118(20):3175
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1998

[Acute care of alcoholics in Finland - point of intersection between social and health services].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244060
Source
Nord Med. 1981 Nov;96(11):285-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1981

[After-care department with out-patient facilities and day and night hospital in a mental hospital. Experiences from the year 1971].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254435
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1973 Aug 30;93(24):1656-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1973

Alaska Native Elders in Recovery: Linkages between Indigenous Cultural Generativity and Sobriety to Promote Successful Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291474
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2017 Jun; 32(2):209-222
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Jordan P Lewis
James Allen
Author Affiliation
WWAMI School of Medical Education, UAA College of Health, 3211 Providence Drive, HSB 301, Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA. jplewis@alaska.edu.
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2017 Jun; 32(2):209-222
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Alaska
Alaska Natives - psychology
Alcohol Abstinence - psychology
Alcoholism - therapy
Culture
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life
Rural Population
Spirituality
Abstract
This article builds on the People Awakening (PA) Project, which explored an Alaska Native (AN) understanding of the recovery process from alcohol use disorder and sobriety. The aim of this study is to explore motivating and maintenance factors for sobriety among older AN adult participants (age 50+) from across Alaska. Ten life history narratives of Alaska Native older adults, representing Alutiiq, Athabascan, Tlingit, Yup'ik/Cup'ik Eskimos, from the PA sample were explored using thematic analysis. AN older adults are motivated to abstain from, or to quit drinking alcohol through spirituality, family influence, role socialization and others' role modeling, and a desire to engage in indigenous cultural generative activities with their family and community. A desire to pass on their accumulated wisdom to a younger generation through engagement and sharing of culturally grounded activities and values, or indigenous cultural generativity, is a central unifying motivational and maintenance factor for sobriety. The implications of this research indicates that family, role expectations and socialization, desire for community and culture engagement, and spirituality are central features to both AN Elders' understanding of sobriety, and more broadly, to their successful aging. Future research is needed to test these findings in population-based studies and to explore incorporation of these findings into alcohol treatment programs to support older AN adults' desire to quit drinking and attain long-term sobriety. Sobriety can put older AN adults on a pathway to successful aging, in positions to serve as role models for their family and community, where they are provided opportunities to engage in meaningful indigenous cultural generative acts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28478599 View in PubMed
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Alcohol abstinence, non-hazardous use and hazardous use a decade after alcohol-related hospitalization: registry data linked to population-based representative postal surveys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265226
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:874
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kozma Ahacic
Robert F Kennison
Ingemar Kåreholt
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:874
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - therapy
Ethanol - administration & dosage
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although there is evident association between alcohol-related hospitalization and alcohol use, the relationship has not been well examined. This study analyzed the extent of alcohol abstinence, non-hazardous use and hazardous use among people who had experienced alcohol-related hospitalization during the preceding decade.
Registry data concerning alcohol-related hospitalizations between 1996 and 2007 were linked to two representative surveys, in 2006 and 2007, of residents of Stockholm County. Relevant contrasts were modeled, using logistic regression, in the pooled sample (n = 54 955). Ages were 23-84 years at follow-up.
Among persons previously hospitalized (n = 576), half reported non-hazardous use. Non-hazardous use was less prevalent than in the general population--and the extent of non-hazardous use did not change over time following hospitalization. There were no significant age differences, but non-hazardous use was less frequent among people with repeated episodes of care. One in six was abstinent. Abstinence was more common among the old, while hazardous use (exceeding 14 drinks per week for men, and 9 drinks per week for women) decreased with age. Abstinence also increased over time; among persons hospitalized ten years ago, the abstinence rate was twice that of the general population. Associations with hazardous use over time were less conclusive. Hazardous use among those previously hospitalized decreased over time in one sample but not in the other. After pooling the data, there were indications of a decrease over time following hospitalization, but more prevalent hazardous use than in the general population.
Following alcohol-related hospitalization, abstinence increased, and there was no evidence of regression towards the mean, i.e., towards non-hazardous use. Abstinence was also more widespread among previously hospitalized persons of older ages. With advancing age, changing hazardous alcohol habits among previously hospitalized appears to yield a trend towards promotion of abstinence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25150844 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol- and drug abuse treated in a therapeutic community. A follow-up study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13333
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1974 Jun 3;136(23):1235-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-3-1974

Alcohol detoxification completion, acceptance of referral to substance abuse treatment, and entry into substance abuse treatment among Alaska Native people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288312
Source
Addict Behav. 2017 Feb;65:25-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Ursula Running Bear
Janette Beals
Douglas K Novins
Spero M Manson
Source
Addict Behav. 2017 Feb;65:25-32
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alaska Natives
Alcoholism - therapy
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Little is known about factors associated with detoxification treatment completion and the transition to substance abuse treatment following detoxification among Alaska Native people. This study examined 3 critical points on the substance abuse continuum of care (alcohol detoxification completion, acceptance of referral to substance abuse treatment, entry into substance abuse treatment following detoxification).
The retrospective cohort included 383 adult Alaska Native patients admitted to a tribally owned and managed inpatient detoxification unit. Three multiple logistic regression models estimated the adjusted associations of each outcome separately with demographic/psychosocial characteristics, clinical characteristics, use related behaviors, and health care utilization.
Seventy-five percent completed detoxification treatment. Higher global assessment functioning scores, longer lengths of stay, and older ages of first alcohol use were associated with completing detoxification. A secondary drug diagnosis was associated with not completing detoxification. Thirty-six percent accepted a referral to substance abuse treatment following detoxification. Men, those with legal problems, and those with a longer length of stay were more likely to accept a referral to substance abuse treatment. Fifty-eight percent had a confirmed entry into a substance abuse treatment program at discharge. Length of stay was the only variable associated with substance abuse treatment entry.
Services like motivational interviewing, counseling, development of therapeutic alliance, monetary incentives, and contingency management are effective in linking patients to services after detoxification. These should be considered, along with the factors associated with each point on the continuum of care when linking patients to follow-up services.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27705843 View in PubMed
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148 records – page 1 of 15.