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165 records – page 1 of 17.

The 2-year course following detoxification treatment of substance abuse: the possible influence of psychiatric comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11106
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1997;247(6):320-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
K. Tómasson
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, National University Hospital, Landspítalinn, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1997;247(6):320-7
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry) - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
The influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the course and outcome in a nationwide representative sample (n = 351) of treatment-seeking substance users over a 28-month period was studied prospectively. The patients were administered the Diagnostic Interview Schedule and a questionnaire on drinking history. At 16 and 28 months after admission the patients returned a questionnaire on drinking history and mental health. In cases of those lacking information on either follow-up (45%), details on drinking status was obtained from informants. Completely abstinent were 16%. Generalized anxiety disorder and/or social phobia at the index admission predicted abstinence during the follow-up [odds ratio (OR) = 0.25], whereas onset of alcoholism among these patients after age 25 years predicted a worse prognosis (OR = 13.5). Also increasing number of social consequences related to abuse (OR = 1.3) and drinking more than the median (OR = 2.1) predicted a poor outcome. The abstinent group had significantly better mental health at follow-up. The patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders at admission were worse at follow-up. Although substance use disorders and comorbid psychiatric disorders have to a certain degree separate courses, there is nevertheless significant interaction between them. Early treatment and recognition of comorbid psychiatric disorders among substance abusers is necessary.
PubMed ID
9477012 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of moderate drinking by alcoholism treatment services in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211210
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1996 Sep;57(5):559-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
H. Rosenberg
E G Devine
N. Rothrock
Author Affiliation
Psychology Department, Bowling Green State University, Ohio 43403, USA.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1996 Sep;57(5):559-62
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Ambulatory Care
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Goals
Humans
Patient Admission
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Temperance - psychology
Abstract
The present study was conducted to provide a nationwide survey of acceptance of nonabstinence goals and related alcoholism treatment practices by Canadian alcoholism treatment services.
A random sample of 335 Canadian alcoholism treatment service agencies were mailed a 4-page questionnaire designed to assess acceptance of moderate drinking as a drinking goal and related alcoholism treatment practices.
Acceptance varied by type of service, with considerably more acceptance by outpatient programs (62%) and mixed inpatient/outpatient programs (43%) than inpatient/detoxification/ correctional facilities (27%) and halfway houses (16%). Two-thirds of the respondents who reported moderate drinking as unacceptable in their own agencies categorically rejected moderation for all alcoholism clients.
Individuals seeking services in Canadian alcoholism treatment agencies are more likely to have a choice of drinking goals if they present to an outpatient program than a residential institution, and Canadian agencies appear more accepting of moderation goals than American programs, but less accepting than British and Norwegian service agencies.
PubMed ID
8858554 View in PubMed
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Acculturation, alcoholism and Indian-style Alcoholics Anonymous.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245019
Source
J Stud Alcohol Suppl. 1981 Jan;9:143-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1981

Acupuncture treatment for women with concurrent substance use and anxiety/depression: an effective alternative therapy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164364
Source
Fam Community Health. 2007 Apr-Jun;30(2):112-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Christine M A Courbasson
Alicia Araujo de Sorkin
Berit Dullerud
Lucy Van Wyk
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Christine_Courbasson@camh.net
Source
Fam Community Health. 2007 Apr-Jun;30(2):112-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture, Ear
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - psychology - therapy
Anxiety Disorders - complications - prevention & control
Depressive Disorder - complications - prevention & control
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Personality Inventory
Self Efficacy
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
This exploratory study evaluated the benefits of adding auricular acupuncture to a 21-day outpatient structured psychoeducational treatment program for women with concurrent substance use problems, anxiety, and depression. Women receiving acupuncture (n = 185) reported having reduced physiological cravings for substances, felt significantly less depressed, less anxious, and were better able to reflect on and resolve difficulties than women in the control group (n = 101). It was found that auricular acupuncture, as an adjunct therapy to a comprehensive psychoeducational treatment program for women with addictions, shows promise in being an effective, more viable treatment alternative to anxiolytics.
PubMed ID
19241647 View in PubMed
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Adolescent antisocial behavior and substance use: longitudinal analyses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10058
Source
Addict Behav. 2002 Mar-Apr;27(2):227-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sigrun Adalbjarnardottir
Fjolvar Darri Rafnsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, Oddi, University of Iceland, Reykjavik. sa@hi.is
Source
Addict Behav. 2002 Mar-Apr;27(2):227-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - psychology
Family Health
Female
Humans
Iceland
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
This study explores how antisocial behavior among adolescents at age 14 is related longitudinally to their daily smoking, heavy alcohol use, and illicit drug use (hashish and amphetamines) at age 17. The sample of 9th graders (n = 1293) attending compulsory schools in Reykjavik, Iceland participated in the study and in the follow-up 3 years later. The focus is on a subgroup of 17-year-old adolescents who had not experimented with cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, or illicit drug use at age 14. Even after eliminating from the study those who had experimented with smoking at age 14 and those whose peers smoked, the adolescents who showed more signs of antisocial behavior at age 14 were more likely to smoke daily at age 17. Similar findings were revealed for illicit drug use at age 17. Further, with regard to alcohol use, adolescents who had not experimented with alcohol but showed indications of antisocial behavior at age 14 were more likely to drink heavily at each episode at age 17 if their parents drank.
PubMed ID
11817764 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol abuse prevention in health care services: screening methods and motivational counseling]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10685
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Mar 31;96(13):1594-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-1999
Author
S. Andréasson
A B Eklund
Author Affiliation
Beroendecentrum Nord, Stockholm. sven.andreasson@bekl.csso.sll.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Mar 31;96(13):1594-8
Date
Mar-31-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology
Counseling
English Abstract
Family Practice
Guidelines
Humans
Mass Screening
Models, Psychological
Physician-Patient Relations
Preventive Health Services
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Health service prevention of alcohol problems is based on screening and primarily involves motivational counselling. Screening may take the form of routine enquiries about drinking habits. Motivational counselling consists in two parts, assessment of readiness to change, and counselling adapted to the readiness to change. Alcohol problems do not generally require intervention by a specialist, but rather by an observer who suggests a change. Doctors and health care authorities alike should pursue the prevention of alcohol problems by such methods as a matter of policy, as this is a demonstrably effective approach which would enable both the need and costs of health care to be reduced.
PubMed ID
10218343 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol abusers after treatment at clinics--a follow-up study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11338
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Oct 20;115(25):3180
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1995
Author
P. Vollset
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Oct 20;115(25):3180
Date
Oct-20-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation - therapy
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Norway
Self-Help Groups
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
PubMed ID
8539702 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Alcohol abusers in the psychiatric emergency departments in Copenhagen and Frederiksberg]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12062
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Feb 18;153(8):567-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-1991
Author
U. Søgaard
A S Naylor
J. Knop
F J Thusholt
E O Holm-Jensen
Author Affiliation
Rigshospitalet psykiatrisk afdeling O, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Feb 18;153(8):567-70
Date
Feb-18-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium - psychology - therapy
Alcoholic Intoxication - psychology - therapy
Alcoholism - psychology - therapy
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - utilization
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - utilization
Psychoses, Alcoholic - psychology - therapy
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
On the basis of a prospective random sample investigation of 611 alcohol-related visits to the four psychiatric emergency units of the City of Copenhagen, demographic variables, referral sources and dispositions of treatment are described. On every 10th day throughout 1985 all visits were registered. The distribution of all variables except age and sex deviate significantly from those of non-alcohol-related visits. Thus fewer alcoholics cohabit and more are divorced. 25% of the alcohol-related visits resulted in an overnight stay in the unit, while 10% resulted in admission to the psychiatric ward. For non-alcohol-related visits the proportions were the reverse.
PubMed ID
2008741 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and drug intoxication during police interrogation and the reasons why suspects confess to the police.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11535
Source
Addiction. 1994 Aug;89(8):985-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
J F Sigurdsson
G H Gudjonsson
Author Affiliation
National Prison and Probation Administration, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Addiction. 1994 Aug;89(8):985-97
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prisoners - psychology
Psychotropic Drugs - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Control, Formal
Street Drugs - adverse effects
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
This study investigates the effects of alcohol, drug intoxication and withdrawal symptoms on the mental state of criminal suspects and the nature of their confession. A total of 359 sentenced prisoners were approached on admission and 96% agreed to participate in the study. They completed a specially designed Confession Questionnaire, which asked them questions about their reasons for confessing to the police, their attitude towards their confession, their mental state at the time of the confession and the extent to which they had been under the influence of alcohol and drug intoxication at the time of crime and police interview. The confession rate for the sample was very high (92%), with serious traffic violators having the highest confession rate (95%) and sex offenders the lowest (83%). The findings illustrate that the "perception of proof", "internal need to confess" and "external pressure" are the main reasons why suspects confess. However, subjects were identified who had experienced a typical "prisoner's dilemma" phenomenon during the police interview because of a co-defendant. Alcohol and drug intoxication was very commonly reported both at the time of the offence and the police interview, but these were related to the nature of their offence. Although intoxication and withdrawal symptoms did not appear to seriously impair their coping during the police interview it was consistently reported as having made them confused.
PubMed ID
7950856 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol and drug problems: a challenge to consultation-liaison psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233134
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1988 May;33(4):259-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1988
Author
F B Glaser
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1988 May;33(4):259-63
Date
May-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - psychology
Hospitals, General
Humans
Ontario
Referral and Consultation
Research
Sick Role
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Abstract
Although alcohol and drug problems are prevalent in the population at large and among patients in general hospitals, they have not been a major concern of consultation-liaison psychiatry. A setting in which all psychiatric consultations are directed to such problems, the Clinical Institute of the Addiction Research Foundation, is described, and parameters of its consultation experience are explored. It is suggested that dealing with alcohol and drug problems should become an integral aspect of consultation-liaison psychiatry. Such a development may prove to be especially fruitful in teaching a comprehensive approach to patient care.
PubMed ID
3289721 View in PubMed
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165 records – page 1 of 17.