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177 records – page 1 of 18.

[40 nurses reported for abuse every year].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240804
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1984 Feb 29;84(9):4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-29-1984
Author
P. Kristensen
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1984 Feb 29;84(9):4-6
Date
Feb-29-1984
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Denmark
Humans
Licensure, Nursing
Nurses
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
PubMed ID
6562777 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal community alcohol harm reduction policy (ACAHRP) project: a vision for the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159852
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2007;42(12-13):1851-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Louis Gliksman
Margaret Rylett
Ronald R Douglas
Author Affiliation
Social, Prevention & Health Policy Research Department, Centre for Addiction & Mental Health, London, Ontario M5S 2S1, Canada. louis_gliksman@camh.net
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2007;42(12-13):1851-66
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Harm Reduction
Health Policy
Health Surveys
Humans
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Ownership
Population Groups
Abstract
Four First Nation communities in Ontario, Canada, formulated alcohol management policies between 1992 and 1994. An alcohol management policy is a local control option to manage alcohol use in recreation and leisure areas. Survey results indicate that decreases in alcohol use-related problems related to intoxication, nuisance behaviors, criminal activity, liquor license violations, and personal harm were perceived to have occurred. Furthermore, having policy regulations in place did not have an adverse effect on facility rentals. Band administrators and facility staff in each community felt the policy had had a positive effect on events at which alcohol was sold or served.
PubMed ID
18075913 View in PubMed
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Advertising and alcohol sales: a legal impact study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225489
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1991 Nov;52(6):555-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
C R Makowsky
P C Whitehead
Author Affiliation
Health Services and Promotion Branch, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1991 Nov;52(6):555-67
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - supply & distribution
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Public Policy
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
According to the single distribution theory increases in the availability of alcoholic beverages in the general population are associated with increases in average consumption and increases in alcohol-related damage. If it can be demonstrated that advertising contributes to availability, perhaps in the form of what has been called social or subjective availability, then advertising could be considered an appropriate target of prevention. A 58-year ban on advertising of alcoholic beverages was lifted in Saskatchewan in 1983. Data on monthly sales of beer, wine and distilled spirits were examined for the years 1981 to 1987. Box-Jenkins time series techniques were used to estimate the statistical relationship between the policy change and volume of sales of alcoholic beverages. The results revealed that sales of beer increased and sales of spirits decreased following the change in legislation that permitted alcohol advertising in Saskatchewan. The main finding is that there was no impact on wine and total alcohol sales from the introduction of alcohol advertising. Alcohol advertising may have produced a substitution effect with respect to beer and spirits, but this was not predicted. This evaluation suggests that alcohol advertising is not a contributory force that influences the overall level of alcohol consumption. The place of advertising in the single distribution theory remains not proven, and the place of advertising as an instrument of public policy with respect to the prevention of alcohol-related damage remains in question.
PubMed ID
1758183 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Agenda--prevention of alcoholism in children and adolescents]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41820
Source
Zdravookhr Ross Fed. 1978;(12):38-9
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1978

Alcohol and alcohol problems research. 3. Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12725
Source
Br J Addict. 1985 Sep;80(3):245-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1985

[Alcohol and the effects of control measures]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12280
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Oct 4;86(40):3389-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-4-1989
Author
H. Boström
P. Allebeck
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Oct 4;86(40):3389-91
Date
Oct-4-1989
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Humans
Policy Making
Sweden
PubMed ID
2796531 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Alcohol consumption and alcoholic psychoses].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231586
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1989;89(2):93-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
A V Nemtsov
A K Nechaev
L A Panchenko
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1989;89(2):93-7
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholic Beverages - supply & distribution
Alcoholism - prevention & control - psychology
Ethanol - supply & distribution
Humans
Moscow
Psychoses, Alcoholic - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Seasons
Abstract
The course of alcoholic psychoses was juxtaposed to that of alcoholic beverages purchase in Moscow during 1984-1986. Antialcoholic measures since June, 1985, sharply decreased the number of psychoses to 33.1% of the 1984 level. Their distribution within a month has changed. The alcoholic beverages purchase in 1986 was 61.7% of that in 1984. The number of alcoholic psychoses displayed a strong correlation with the purchase level (r = +0.90). Regression analysis showed that beverages purchase reduction to 28% of the 1984 level would fully abolish the alcoholic psychoses in Moscow. The conclusion was that the alcoholic psychoses can serve as a reliable index of the effectiveness of anti-alcoholic measures.
PubMed ID
2728729 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol control policies: a public health issue revisited.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242426
Source
WHO Chron. 1983;37(5):169-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983

177 records – page 1 of 18.