Skip header and navigation

Refine By

177 records – page 1 of 18.

The abolition of the Swedish alcohol rationing system: effects on consumption distribution and cirrhosis mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12586
Source
Br J Addict. 1987 Jun;82(6):633-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987

Abstinence from alcohol and alcohol rehabilitation therapy in alcoholic liver disease: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310832
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2020 Apr; 55(4):472-478
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2020
Author
Einar S Björnsson
Kristjan Hauksson
Ragna Sigurdardottir
Margret Arnardottir
Arnar S Agustsson
Sigrun H Lund
Evangelos Kalaitzakis
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2020 Apr; 55(4):472-478
Date
Apr-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hepatitis, Alcoholic - mortality - rehabilitation
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality - rehabilitation
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
Objective: Abstinence from alcohol is recommended in patients diagnosed with alcoholic hepatitis (AH) and alcoholic cirrhosis (AC). We aimed to determine the impact of alcohol abstinence on prognosis of patients with AC and AH.Methods: All incident AC and AH patients in Iceland 2001-2016 were identified. Cirrhosis was confirmed clinically, biochemically, with imaging and histologically. Abstinence, alcohol rehabilitation and survival were analyzed.Results: Overall, 169 patients with AC and/or AH were identified. Eleven died during index hospitalization, leaving 158 patients for final analysis, median (IQR) age 56?years (48-65), 72% males. Over all 61 patients (39%) had AC, 40 (25%) AH and 57 (36%) features of both. Thirty-nine percent of patients remained abstinent during follow-up and 63% underwent alcohol rehabilitation. Moderate to severe ascites at diagnosis (odds ratio (OR): 3.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.37-7.02) and lack of alcoholic rehabilitation (OR: 5.28, 95% CI: 2.24- 14.11) were independent predictors of abstinence. Abstinence at one year of follow-up was not related to increased survival. Patients surviving one year, abstinence during follow-up was related to increased survival for both groups.Conclusion: Abstinence from alcohol following AC/AH diagnosis was achieved in 39% of patients. Abstinence was not related to increased survival for alcoholic liver disease patients at one-year, which might partly indicate that this might be a marker that some patients were 'too sick to drink'. AC and AH patients who survived one year and remained abstinent had a favorable long-term prognosis.
PubMed ID
32233877 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-dependent association of apolipoprotein E genotype with coronary and aortic atherosclerosis in middle-aged men: an autopsy study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201193
Source
Circulation. 1999 Aug 10;100(6):608-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1999
Author
E. Ilveskoski
M. Perola
T. Lehtimäki
P. Laippala
V. Savolainen
J. Pajarinen
A. Penttilä
K H Lalu
A. Männikkö
K K Liesto
T. Koivula
P J Karhunen
Author Affiliation
Medical School, University of Tampere, Tampere University Hospital, Finland. ei46478@uta.fi
Source
Circulation. 1999 Aug 10;100(6):608-13
Date
Aug-10-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alcoholism - mortality
Alleles
Aorta, Abdominal - pathology
Aorta, Thoracic - pathology
Aortic Diseases - epidemiology
Apolipoprotein E3
Apolipoprotein E4
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Arteriosclerosis - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Autopsy
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Heterozygote
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Violence
Abstract
Apolipoprotein E (apoE) polymorphism is one of the genetic determinants of serum cholesterol values. The apoE epsilon4 allele has been associated with advanced coronary heart disease (CHD) diagnosed by angiography, but the role of the apoE genotype in atherosclerosis has not been confirmed at vessel-wall level, nor is any age-dependent effect of the apoE genotype on the development of CHD known.
The right and left anterior descending coronary arteries (RCA and LAD) and the aorta from 700 male autopsy cases (Helsinki Sudden Death Study) in 1981-1982 and 1991-1992 (average age 53 years, range 33 to 70 years) were stained for fat, and all areas covered with fatty streaks, fibrotic plaques, and complicated lesions were measured. In the RCA and LAD, the apoE genotype was significantly associated with the area of total atherosclerotic lesions in men
PubMed ID
10441097 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol abuse and mortality: a 40-year prospective study of Norwegian conscripts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11131
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1997 Jan;44(2):261-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
I. Rossow
A. Amundsen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1997 Jan;44(2):261-7
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Alcoholism - mortality
Cause of Death
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The availability of a 40-yr prospective study of more than 40,000 Norwegian men born in 1932-33 constituted the point of departure for assessing excess mortality in alcohol abusers as well as proportions of premature deaths in men attributable to alcohol abuse. The conscripts were medically examined at the military screening, alcohol abuse was categorized for those registered as admitted to alcohol treatment units over a 35-yr period from 1951 to 1987, and these data were further linked to the national death register in 1991. A total of 4468 men died before the age of 60 (10.8% of the sample). Alcohol abusers were found to have an overall excess mortality of 3.3, increasing with age. The cumulative risk of death before the age of 60 yr was estimated to 0.405 for the alcohol abusers, and at least 6.7% of all deaths before the age of 60 could be attributed to alcohol abuse. Presence of chronic diseases at conscription did not confound the estimates of excess mortality in alcohol abusers, neither was any significant interaction between chronic diseases at conscription and later alcohol abuse found with respect to mortality. The most prevalent causes of death in the total sample were, in descending order, cardiovascular diseases, malignant tumors, and accidents. The relative risks for alcohol abusers of death from accidents,cardiovascular diseases, and malignant tumors were estimated as 3.2, 2.5, and 1.8, respectively.
PubMed ID
9015878 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol abuse and suicide: a 40-year prospective study of Norwegian conscripts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11405
Source
Addiction. 1995 May;90(5):685-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
I. Rossow
A. Amundsen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Addiction. 1995 May;90(5):685-91
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - mortality - psychology
Cause of Death
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Suicide mortality among alcohol abusers and the prevalence of alcohol abusers among suicides were assessed in a 40-year follow-up study of 40,000 Norwegian military conscripts. Alcohol abuse was operationalized as either admission to alcohol treatment clinic, alcohol related cause of death, or both. The relative risk of suicide among alcohol abusers was estimated to 6.9. The relative risk of committing suicide among alcohol abusers appeared to be higher in middle age (more than 40 years) than in younger age groups (RR = 12.8 and 4.5, respectively). The life-time risk of suicide, i.e. before the age of 60 years, was estimated to 0.63% for those not categorized as alcohol abusers and 4.76% for those categorized as alcohol abusers.
PubMed ID
7795504 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol and cause-specific mortality in Russia: a retrospective case-control study of 48,557 adult deaths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88559
Source
Lancet. 2009 Jun 27;373(9682):2201-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-27-2009
Author
Zaridze David
Brennan Paul
Boreham Jillian
Boroda Alex
Karpov Rostislav
Lazarev Alexander
Konobeevskaya Irina
Igitov Vladimir
Terechova Tatiana
Boffetta Paolo
Peto Richard
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, N N Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Centre, Moscow, Russia. dgzaridze@crc.umos.ru
Source
Lancet. 2009 Jun 27;373(9682):2201-14
Date
Jun-27-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Alcoholism - mortality
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death - trends
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cost of Illness
Death Certificates
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Distribution
Siberia - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Alcohol is an important determinant of the high and fluctuating adult mortality rates in Russia, but cause-specific detail is lacking. Our case-control study investigated the effects of alcohol consumption on male and female cause-specific mortality. METHODS: In three Russian industrial cities with typical 1990s mortality patterns (Tomsk, Barnaul, Biysk), the addresses of 60,416 residents who had died at ages 15-74 years in 1990-2001 were visited in 2001-05. Family members were present for 50,066 decedents; for 48,557 (97%), the family gave proxy information on the decedents' past alcohol use and on potentially confounding factors. Cases (n=43,082) were those certified as dying from causes we judged beforehand might be substantially affected by alcohol or tobacco; controls were the other 5475 decedents. Case versus control relative risks (RRs; calculated as odds ratios by confounder-adjusted logistic regression) were calculated in ever-drinkers, defining the reference category by two criteria: usual weekly consumption always less than 0.5 half-litre bottles of vodka (or equivalent in total alcohol content) and maximum consumption of spirits in 1 day always less than 0.5 half-litre bottles. Other ever-drinkers were classified by usual weekly consumption into three categories: less than one, one to less than three, and three or more (mean 5.4 [SD 1.4]) bottles of vodka or equivalent. FINDINGS: In men, the three causes accounting for the most alcohol-associated deaths were accidents and violence (RR 5.94, 95% CI 5.35-6.59, in the highest consumption category), alcohol poisoning (21.68, 17.94-26.20), and acute ischaemic heart disease other than myocardial infarction (3.04, 2.73-3.39), which includes some misclassified alcohol poisoning. There were significant excesses of upper aerodigestive tract cancer (3.48, 2.84-4.27) and liver cancer (2.11, 1.64-2.70). Another five disease groups had RRs of more than 3.00 in the highest alcohol category: tuberculosis (4.14, 3.44-4.98), pneumonia (3.29, 2.83-3.83), liver disease (6.21, 5.16-7.47), pancreatic disease (6.69, 4.98-9.00), and ill-specified conditions (7.74, 6.48-9.25). Although drinking was less common in women, the RRs associated with it were generally more extreme. After correction for reporting errors, alcohol-associated excesses accounted for 52% of all study deaths at ages 15-54 years (men 8182 [59%] of 13968, women 1565 [33%] of 4751) and 18% of those at 55-74 years (men 3944 [22%] of 17,536, women 1493 [12%] of 12 302). Allowance for under-representation of extreme drinkers would further increase alcohol-associated proportions. Large fluctuations in mortality from these ten strongly alcohol-associated causes were the main determinants of recent fluctuations in overall mortality in the study region and in Russia as a whole. INTERPRETATION: Alcohol-attributable mortality varies by year; in several recent years, alcohol was a cause of more than half of all Russian deaths at ages 15-54 years. Alcohol accounts for most of the large fluctuations in Russian mortality, and alcohol and tobacco account for the large difference in adult mortality between Russia and western Europe. FUNDING: UK Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK, British Heart Foundation, International Agency for Research on Cancer, and European Commission Directorate-General for Research.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Jun 27;373(9682):2176-719560585
PubMed ID
19560602 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1992 Aug;16(4):670-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
H G Giles
S. Sandrin
Author Affiliation
Addiction Research Foundation, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1992 Aug;16(4):670-2
Date
Aug-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality
Alcoholism - mortality
Cause of Death
Ethanol - pharmacokinetics
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prisoners - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - pharmacokinetics - poisoning
Social Control, Formal
Substance-Related Disorders - mortality
Abstract
We examined the involvement of alcohol consumption, chronic alcohol abuse or dependence, the soundness of the police determination of alcohol-related intoxication, and the importance of other drugs in deaths in police custody in a survey of the cases reported to the Chief Coroner of Ontario during the past 10 years. The data suggest no mismanagement by the police. At least 86% of the fatalities were associated with recent alcohol consumption or chronic alcohol abuse/dependence. Use of drugs other than alcohol was far less common. Promoting use and further development of simple tests to estimate blood alcohol concentration, chronic alcohol problems, and suicide risk, before incarceration takes place, may save lives.
PubMed ID
1530128 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Oct 8;129(19):2026
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-8-2009
Author
Oda Riska
Author Affiliation
oriska@hotmail.com
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Oct 8;129(19):2026
Date
Oct-8-2009
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - mortality
Alcoholism - mortality
Cause of Death
Humans
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Young Adult
PubMed ID
19823218 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol and fatal life trajectories in Russia: understanding narrative accounts of premature male death in the family.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133585
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:481
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Lyudmila Saburova
Katherine Keenan
Natalia Bobrova
David A Leon
Diana Elbourne
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:481
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - mortality
Employment
Family
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality, Premature - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
In the post-Soviet period, Russian working-age men have suffered unusually high mortality rates. Earlier quantitative work found that part of this is attributable to hazardous and harmful patterns of alcohol consumption, which increased in the period of transition at a time of massive social and economic disruption and uncertainty. However, there has been very little work done to document and understand in detail the downward life trajectories of individual men who died prematurely from alcohol-related conditions. Building on an earlier case-control study, this unique qualitative study investigates the perceived interplay between men's drinking careers, their employment and family history, health and eventual death.
In-depth interviews were conducted with close relatives (most often the widow) of 19 men who died between 2003 and 2005 aged 25-54 years whose close relatives reported that alcohol contributed to their death. The study was conducted in a typical medium-sized Russian city. The relative's accounts were analysed using thematic content analysis.
The accounts describe how hazardous drinking both contributed to serious employment, family and health problems, and was simultaneously used as a coping mechanism to deal with life crises and a decline in social status. The interviews highlighted the importance of the workplace and employment status for shaping men's drinking patterns. Common themes emerged around a culture of drinking in the workplace, peer pressure from colleagues to drink, use of alcohol as remuneration, consuming non-beverage alcohols, Russian-specific drinking patterns, attitudes to treatment, and passive attitudes towards health and drinking.
The study provides a unique insight into the personal decline that lies behind the extremely high working-age mortality due to heavy drinking in Russia, and highlights how health status and hazardous drinking are often closely intertwined with economic and social functioning. Descriptions of the development of drinking careers, hazardous drinking patterns and treatment experiences can be used to plan effective interventions relevant in the Russian context.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jun 27;373(9682):2201-1419560602
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jan 31;373(9661):399-40719150132
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2010 Mar;34(1):132-6819967435
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2010 Oct;20(5):569-7520219866
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Oct;39(5):1279-9020591986
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2010 Nov-Dec;45(6):573-8021075855
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2000 Nov;51(9):1313-2411037219
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2002 Mar;43(1):42-5511949196
Cites: Addiction. 2002 Nov;97(11):1413-2512410782
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1995 Oct;41(7):923-348545667
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 1996 Jan;31(1):103-148838396
Cites: Lancet. 1997 Aug 9;350(9075):383-89259651
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Dec;52(12):772-410396517
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2005 Oct;29(10):1884-816269919
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2006 Mar;84(3):239-4516583084
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2006 Jun;30(6):922-716737449
Cites: Addiction. 2007 Apr;102(4):544-5317362291
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Jun 16;369(9578):2001-917574092
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jan;66(2):327-3817949875
Cites: Sociol Health Illn. 2008 Nov;30(7):1070-8518564970
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2009 Jan;33(1):79-8519018753
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(13):1821-3220001282
PubMed ID
21689451 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol and ill health: the continuing debate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12038
Source
Br J Addict. 1991 Apr;86(4):379-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Dept of Community Medicine, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Br J Addict. 1991 Apr;86(4):379-82
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - mortality
Alcoholism - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Br J Addict. 1990 Feb;85(2):271-82180510
Comment On: Br J Addict. 1990 Jul;85(7):837-47; discussion 849-612204454
PubMed ID
2054531 View in PubMed
Less detail

177 records – page 1 of 18.