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42 records – page 1 of 5.

[Acceptance of van Swieten's liquor in Japan]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9759
Source
Nippon Ishigaku Zasshi. 2002 Dec;48(4):575-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Fumi Takahashi
Source
Nippon Ishigaku Zasshi. 2002 Dec;48(4):575-95
Date
Dec-2002
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohols - history
Austria
Commerce - history
English Abstract
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Japan
Mercury - history
Prescriptions, Drug - history
Sweden
Syphilis - history
Abstract
Carl Peter Thunberg, a Swedish medical doctor and botanist who visited Japan in 1775 as a medical doctor attached to the Dutch Trade House in Dejima, Nagasaki, taught the treatment of syphilis using mercury water to Japanese doctors and interpreters. This therapy is based on the oral administration of a 0.014% solution of mercuric chloride and was published in 1754 by Gerard van Swieten in Vienna, who questioned the utility of the conventional salivation therapy. The dose was set taking safety into account. Kogyu Yoshio, a Japanese-Dutch interpreter, had already read about it in a book written by J. J. Plenck, when he was taught about the therapy by Thunberg. He recorded Thunberg's teachings in his book "Komohijiki", presenting details of various formulations, including a high-dose formulation. The mercury therapy was subsequently spread across the country by medical doctors who learned Western medicine through the Dutch. In the 1820's, Genshin Udagawa, who read a number of Western medical books, published books on Western drugs. In these books, G. Udagawa included precise information on "Swieten Yakushu-hu (medicated alcohol)", including information on the dosage, formulation, mode of usage, and precautions for use. The maximum dose of mercuric chloride established chloride established by van Swieten was included in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia up to its 5th edition.
PubMed ID
12680425 View in PubMed
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Source
Polar Rec (Gr Brit). 1983;21(135):601-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
C E Albrecht
Source
Polar Rec (Gr Brit). 1983;21(135):601-3
Date
1983
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - history
History, Modern 1601-
United States
PubMed ID
11615078 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and alcohol problems research. 4. Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238389
Source
Br J Addict. 1985 Sep;80(3):255-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1985

Alcohol and health in Russia: good news at last.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295039
Source
Lancet. 2017 Sep 30; 390(10102):1616-1618
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Sep-30-2017

Alcohol and suicide in Russia, 1870-1894 and 1956-2005: evidence for the continuation of a harmful drinking culture across time?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136336
Source
J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2011 Mar;72(2):341-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Stickley, A
Jukkala, T
Norström, T
Author Affiliation
European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, United Kingdom. andrew.stickley@lshtm.ac.uk
Source
J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2011 Mar;72(2):341-7
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - history - mortality - trends
Alcoholic Intoxication - history - mortality
Alcoholism - history - mortality
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Male
Risk-Taking
Russia
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
Previous research suggests that a strong relation exists between alcohol consumption and suicide in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. This study extends this analysis across a much longer historical time frame by examining the relationship between heavy drinking and suicide in tsarist and post-World War II Russia.
Using alcohol poisoning mortality data as a proxy for heavy drinking, time-series analytical modeling techniques were used to examine the strength of the alcohol-suicide relation in the provinces of European Russia in the period 1870-1894 and for Russia in 1956-2005.
During 1870-1894, a decreasing trend was recorded in heavy drinking in Russia that contrasted with the sharp increase observed in this phenomenon in the post-World War II period. A rising trend in suicide was recorded in both study periods, although the increase was much greater in the latter period. The strength of the heavy drinking-suicide relation nevertheless remained unchanged across time, with a 10% increase in heavy drinking resulting in a 3.5% increase in suicide in tsarist Russia and a 3.8% increase in post-World War II Russia.
Despite the innumerable societal changes that have occurred in Russia across the two study periods and the growth in the level of heavy drinking, the strength of the heavy drinking-suicide relation has remained unchanged across time. This suggests the continuation of a highly detrimental drinking culture where the heavy episodic drinking of distilled spirits (vodka) is an essential element in the alcohol-suicide association.
PubMed ID
21388607 View in PubMed
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[Alcoholism as a social and hygienic problem (2)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237908
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1986;(4):59-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986

[Alcoholism-a study by Carl von Linnes in "Nemesis Divina"]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86125
Source
Sven Med Tidskr. 2007;11(1):95-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Ojesjö Leif
Author Affiliation
leif.ojesjo@stockholm.bonet.se
Source
Sven Med Tidskr. 2007;11(1):95-104
Date
2007
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - history
Anecdotes as Topic
History, 18th Century
Humans
Medicine in Literature
Sweden
Abstract
Linnaeus' (1707- 1778) anecdotes in Nemesis Divina and stories from the Lundby Study were taken as a starting point for this essay an about the fate of heavy ("gluttonous") drinkers. The narratives are real enough, even if their meanings are interpreted as highly metaphorical. It is argued that through Linnaeus thinking on diet, alcohol, excessive appetites and God's revenge, today's secular awareness of risk behavior and unhealthy life styles may be expanded. Hence, new insights can grow from different perspectives on complicated problems.
PubMed ID
18548948 View in PubMed
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Alcohol mortality in Russia: a historical perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153664
Source
Public Health. 2009 Jan;123(1):20-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
A. Stickley
Y. Razvodovsky
M. McKee
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition, University College of South Stockholm, SE 141 89 Huddinge, Sweden. andrew.stickley@sh.se
Source
Public Health. 2009 Jan;123(1):20-6
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - history - mortality
Europe - epidemiology
Female
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Mortality - history - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine major changes in the supply of alcohol in Russia and its impact on health in late-tsarist and early-Soviet society.
Statistical data on acute forms of alcohol mortality were drawn from official publications and medical literature published in the period 1860-1930 that covered the 50 provinces of European Russia and some of the major cities in the Russian Empire. These data were examined for across-time changes in alcohol mortality in relation to changes in the availability of alcohol products, both in terms of increased and decreased levels of supply.
Rapid changes in the supply of alcoholic products in earlier periods of Russian history resulted in quick and marked changes in the levels of acute alcohol mortality. However, while restrictions on the availability of spirits have sometimes been effective in reducing alcohol mortality, there has often been a rapid recourse to alternative forms of alcohol, i.e. alcohol surrogates.
The lesson of history suggests that any attempt to deal with the problem of hazardous drinking in Russia must deal with all sources of alcohol, both legal and illegal, as individuals have demonstrated a high degree of ingenuity in identifying alternative sources of alcohol, both in the past and the present.
PubMed ID
19084882 View in PubMed
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Alexey Kondratyevich Savrasov (1830-1897): the muse and the bottle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164673
Source
J Med Biogr. 2007 Feb;15(1):4-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Vladimir Lerner
Eliezer Witztum
Author Affiliation
Be'er Sheva Mental Health Center, PO Box 4600, Be'er Sheva 84170, Israel. lernervld@yahoo.com
Source
J Med Biogr. 2007 Feb;15(1):4-8
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - history
History, 19th Century
Humans
Male
Medicine in Art
Paintings - history
Russia
Abstract
The Russian landscape painter Alexey Savrasov lived in the middle of the 19th century. He was overwhelmed with grief at the loss of several of his children and he used alcohol to blunt the pain and anguish. The effects of psychoactive substances and especially alcohol have been linked closely to creativity. His life story demonstrates the bitter relationship between the bottle and the muse. He became dependent on alcohol, his family broke up and he was fired from work, his creativity declined and his health deteriorated. At death, he was a lonely and a forgotten man and only two persons attended his funeral.
PubMed ID
17356723 View in PubMed
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Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 May 6;95(19):2220-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-6-1998
Author
C. Carlén-Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Medicinhistoriska museerna i Lund och Helsingborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 May 6;95(19):2220-1
Date
May-6-1998
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Medical Records
Psychiatry - history
Sweden
PubMed ID
9623052 View in PubMed
Less detail

42 records – page 1 of 5.