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[Admissions for alcohol problems and subsequent treatment of addiction in a medical department. A 1-year prospective study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12660
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1986 Jul 21;148(30):1920-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-21-1986

Alcohol and drug dependency in Saskatchewan, 1969-1974.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241757
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1983 Jul;44(4):630-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
C. D'Arcy
G. Bold
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1983 Jul;44(4):630-46
Date
Jul-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Female
Health Services - utilization
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Hospitalization
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Saskatchewan
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
The demographic characteristics and the trends in health care utilization of alcohol- and drug-dependent residents of the Canadian province of Saskatchewan from 1969 to 1974 are examined.
PubMed ID
6632882 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol and narcotic problems among conscripted youth]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13169
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1977 Apr 20;97(11):511-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-20-1977
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Feb 27;71(9):805-9
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Feb-27-1974

Alcoholic cirrhosis in Denmark - population-based incidence, prevalence, and hospitalization rates between 1988 and 2005: a descriptive cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87157
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2008;8:3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Jepsen Peter
Vilstrup Hendrik
Sørensen Henrik T
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. pj@dce.au.dk
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2008;8:3
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Denmark has one of the highest alcohol consumption rates in Northern Europe. The overall per capita alcohol consumption has been stable in recent decades, but surveys have indicated that consumption has decreased in the young and increased in the old. However, there is no recent information on the epidemiology of alcoholic cirrhosis. We examined time trends in incidence, prevalence, and hospitalization rates of alcoholic cirrhosis in Denmark between 1988 and 2005. METHODS: We used data from a nationwide population-based hospital registry to identify all Danish citizens with a hospital diagnosis of alcoholic cirrhosis. We computed standardized incidence rates, prevalence and hospitalization rates of alcoholic cirrhosis within the Danish population. We also computed the number of hospitalizations per alcoholic cirrhosis patient per year. RESULTS: From 1988 to 1993, incidence rates for men and women of any age showed no clear trend, and after a 32 percent increase in 1994, rates were stable throughout 2005. In 2001-2005, the incidence rates were 265 and 118 per 1,000,000 per year for men and women, respectively, and the prevalence rates were 1,326 and 701 per 1,000,000. From 1994, incidence, prevalence, and hospitalization rates decreased for men and women younger than 45 years and increased in the older population, although the latter finding might be partly explained by changes in coding practice. Men and women born around 1960 or later had progressively lower age-specific alcoholic cirrhosis incidence rates than the generations before them. From 1996 to 2005, the number of hospitalizations per alcoholic cirrhosis patient per year increased from 1.3 to 1.5 for men and from 1.1 to 1.2 for women. CONCLUSION: From 1988 to 2005, alcoholic cirrhosis put an increasing burden on the Danish healthcare system. However, the decreasing incidence rate in the population younger than 45 years from 1994 indicated that men and women born around 1960 or later had progressively lower incidence rates than the generations before them. Therefore, we expect the overall incidence and prevalence rates of alcoholic cirrhosis to decrease in the future.
PubMed ID
18261240 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-induced psychotic disorder and delirium in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141116
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;197(3):200-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Jonna Perälä
Kimmo Kuoppasalmi
Sami Pirkola
Tommi Härkänen
Samuli Saarni
Annamari Tuulio-Henriksson
Satu Viertiö
Antti Latvala
Seppo Koskinen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Jaana Suvisaari
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Helsinki, Finland. jonna.perala@thl.fi
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;197(3):200-6
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium - epidemiology - therapy
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Ambulatory Care
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Epidemiologic Methods
Family Health
Fathers - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hallucinations - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Psychoses, Alcoholic - epidemiology - therapy
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Epidemiological data on alcohol-induced psychotic disorder and delirium (alcohol-induced psychotic syndrome, AIPS) are scarce.
To investigate the epidemiology of AIPS, the risk factors for developing AIPS among people with alcohol dependence, and mortality associated with alcohol dependence with or without AIPS, in a sample drawn from the general population of Finland.
A general population sample of 8028 persons were interviewed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and screened for psychotic disorders using multiple sources. Best-estimate diagnoses of psychotic disorders were made using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders and case notes. Data on hospital reatments and deaths were collected from national registers.
The lifetime prevalence was 0.5% for AIPS and was highest (1.8%) among men of working age. Younger age at onset of alcohol dependence, low socioeconomic status, father's mental health or alcohol problems and multiple hospital treatments were associated with increased risk of AIPS. Participants with a history of AIPS had considerable medical comorbidity, and 37% of them died during the 8-year follow-up.
Alcohol-induced psychotic disorder is a severe mental disorder with poor outcome.
PubMed ID
20807964 View in PubMed
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Source
Nord Psykiatr Tidsskr. 1973;27(1):14-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973
Author
G A Lundquist
Source
Nord Psykiatr Tidsskr. 1973;27(1):14-21
Date
1973
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Psychoses, Alcoholic - epidemiology
Research
Sweden
PubMed ID
4687746 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid substance use disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127356
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;24(1):38-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Serge Beaulieu
Sybille Saury
Jitender Sareen
Jacques Tremblay
Christian G Schütz
Roger S McIntyre
Ayal Schaffer
Author Affiliation
Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Serge.Beaulieu@McGill.ca
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;24(1):38-55
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Alcoholism - epidemiology - therapy
Anticonvulsants - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antimanic Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - therapy
Canada
Cocaine-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Opioid-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Psychotherapy - methods
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
Mood disorders, especially bipolar disorder (BD), frequently are associated with substance use disorders (SUDs). There are well-designed trials for the treatment of SUDs in the absence of a comorbid condition. However, one cannot generalize these study results to individuals with comorbid mood disorders, because therapeutic efficacy and/or safety and tolerability profiles may differ with the presence of the comorbid disorder. Therefore, a review of the available evidence is needed to provide guidance to clinicians facing the challenges of treating patients with comorbid mood disorders and SUDs.
We reviewed the literature published between January 1966 and November 2010 by using the following search strategies on PubMed. Search terms were bipolar disorder or depressive disorder, major (to exclude depression, postpartum; dysthymic disorder; cyclothymic disorder; and seasonal affective disorder) cross-referenced with alcohol or drug or substance and abuse or dependence or disorder. When possible, a level of evidence was determined for each treatment using the framework of previous Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments recommendations. The lack of evidence-based literature limited the authors' ability to generate treatment recommendations that were strictly evidence based, and as such, recommendations were often based on the authors' opinion.
Even though a large number of treatments were investigated for alcohol use disorder (AUD), none have been sufficiently studied to justify the attribution of level 1 evidence in comorbid AUD with major depressive disorder (MDD) or BD. The available data allows us to generate first-choice recommendations for AUD comorbid with MDD and only third-choice recommendations for cocaine, heroin, and opiate SUD comorbid with MDD. No recommendations were possible for cannabis, amphetamines, methamphetamines, or polysubstance SUD comorbid with MDD. First-choice recommendations were possible for alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine SUD comorbid with BD and only second-choice recommendations for heroin, amphetamine, methamphetamine, and polysubstance SUD comorbid with BD. No recommendations were possible for opiate SUD comorbid with BD. Finally, psychotherapies certainly are considered an essential component of the overall treatment of SUDs comorbid with mood disorders. However, further well-designed studies are needed in order to properly assess their potential role in specific SUDs comorbid with a mood disorder.
Although certain treatments show promise in the management of mood disorders comorbid with SUDs, additional well-designed studies are needed to properly assess their potential role in specific SUDs comorbid with a mood disorder.
PubMed ID
22303521 View in PubMed
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The effect of co-morbid depression and anxiety on the course and outcome of alcohol outpatient treatment: A naturalistic prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268729
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2015 Jul;69(5):331-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Angelina Isabella Mellentin
Bent Nielsen
Elsebeth Stenager
Anette Søgaard Nielsen
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2015 Jul;69(5):331-8
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology - therapy
Anxiety - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients
Prevalence
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies examining the effect of alcohol treatment among patients with alcohol use disorders (AUD) and co-morbid depression and/or anxiety are few and show inconsistent, but mainly negative drinking outcomes.
To describe the prevalence of anxiety and depression among Danish patients seeking treatment for an AUD, and to investigate the influence of psychiatric co-morbidity on the course and effect of treatment.
A consecutive sample of 363 outpatients with an AUD diagnosis according to the ICD-10 Diagnostic Criteria for Research was assessed by the means of the Addiction Severity Index at treatment start and 276 (76%) followed up after 1 year.
15.7% of the patients suffered from depression and 12.7% from anxiety at baseline. Both patients with or without co-morbidity had improved on drinking outcome measures at follow-up with medium to large effect sizes. No difference was found between patients with and without co-morbidity.
In contrast to the majority of prior studies, this study provides evidence that depression and anxiety do not have an effect on alcohol treatment. However, because of the naturalistic setting, a number of limitations should be taken into consideration interpreting the results.
PubMed ID
25981495 View in PubMed
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Employment status, mental disorders and service use in the working age population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164695
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2007 Feb;33(1):29-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Teija Honkonen
Marianna Virtanen
Kirsi Ahola
Mika Kivimäki
Sami Pirkola
Erkki Isometsä
Arpo Aromaa
Jouko Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FI-00250 Helsinki, Finland. teija.honkonen@ttl.fi
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2007 Feb;33(1):29-36
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - therapy
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - therapy
Employment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Marital status
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Abstract
This study examined the association between employment status and specific DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, IVth edition) depressive, anxiety and alcohol use disorders and the association between employment status and service use for these disorders.
As part of the representative population-based "Health 2000 Study" of Finns aged 30 years or over, 3440 employed, 429 unemployed, and 820 economically inactive persons of working age (30-64 years) participated in a comprehensive health examination, including the standardized Composite International Diagnostic Interview.
The risk of mental disorders was generally higher among the unemployed and the economically inactive than among the employed. The respective odds ratios were 1.79 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.26-2.54] and 1.54 (95% CI 1.06-2.25) for depressive disorders, 2.68 (95% CI 1.85-3.89) and 2.53 (95% CI 1.76-3.65) for anxiety disorders, and 2.58 (95% CI 1.82-3.65) and 1.43 (95% CI 0.91-2.22) for alcohol use disorders. Similar results were obtained for most of the specific categories of these disorders. Among the persons with anxiety disorders, the odds for treatment contact were 2.35 (95% CI 1.06-5.23) times higher for the unemployed than for the employed after control for disorder severity. For those with an alcohol use disorder, the corresponding odds ratio was 3.51 (95% CI 1.23-9.98).
Common mental disorders are less prevalent among the employed than among unemployed and economically inactive people. Among those with anxiety or alcohol use disorders, service use is less common among the employed than among the unemployed. This difference is not explained by the severity of the clinical state.
PubMed ID
17353962 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.