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Abuse of and dependence on alcohol in Swedish women: role of education, occupation and family structure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10814
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Sep;33(9):445-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
K L Thundal
P. Allebeck
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Göteborg University, Sweden. Kajsa-Lena.Thundal@socmed.gu.se
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Sep;33(9):445-50
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Demography
Divorce
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Marriage
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The present study, which is part of a multipurpose study on alcohol use among women, focuses on the association between education, occupation, family structure and development of alcohol dependence or abuse in women. A total of 316 women were selected by stratified random sampling from all women in a defined part of Gothenburg, Sweden. In a face to face interview, questions were asked about occupation, education, family structure and other variables reflecting socioeconomic conditions and relations within the family. As outcome measures we used alcohol dependence and abuse (ADA), diagnosed in a clinical interview according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition-Revised (DSM-III-R). We found that never having been married, or having poor communication with the spouse, as well as having no children at home to take care of, were strongly associated with ADA in women. The role of social class depended on whether education or occupation was used as a measure. Our findings are compatible with the hypothesis that development of alcohol-related problems among women to a large extent is influenced by matters that relate to home and private life.
PubMed ID
9766171 View in PubMed
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Adaptive functioning, psychopathology and service use among 18-year-old boys with drunkenness-related alcohol use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171291
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2006 Mar-Apr;41(2):143-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
Solja M Niemelä
Andre Sourander
Kari Poikolainen
Henrik Elonheimo
Hans Helenius
Lauri Sillanmäki
Petteri Multimäki
Kai Parkkola
Author Affiliation
Addiction Clinic at Turku Psychiatric Services, 20700 Turku, Finland. solja.niemela@utu.fi
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2006 Mar-Apr;41(2):143-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Demography
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - utilization
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Questionnaires
Abstract
To study the associations between drunkenness frequency and adaptive functioning, psychopathology and service use among 18-year-old Finnish boys in a nation-wide population-based study.
Information about drunkenness frequency within the previous six months was collected from the Finnish boys born in 1981 (n = 2306) at the boys' obligatory military call-up in 1999. Self-report questionnaires were used to study demographic factors, adaptive functioning, risk behaviour, life events, and mental health service use. Psychopathology and adaptive functioning was assessed with the Young Adult Self-Report (YASR) questionnaire.
Of the boys, 85% reported drunkenness within the previous 6 months. Most of the subjects were occasionally drunk: 39% reported drunkenness less than a month, and 35% less than once a week, while 10% reported being frequently drunk once a week or more often. Occasional drunkenness was associated with better adaptive functioning and psychosocial well-being in general. Refraining from drunkenness was associated with suicidal ideation and internalizing problems in the YASR scale. Frequent drunkenness associated with daily smoking, illicit drug use, and externalizing problems in the YASR scale, especially delinquent behaviour. In the multivariate analysis, number of friends, having a regular relationship and cigarette smoking had a linear association with frequency of drunkenness, while drunkenness-related alcohol use was less common among those with poor friendship quality. Among the participants, entering substance use treatment was rare (0.2%). Frequent drunkenness was found to be common among mental health service users.
Among late-adolescent boys, occasional drunkenness is a normative alcohol use pattern and associates with social competence and good psychosocial functioning. Late-adolescent boys refraining from drunkenness in addition to those with frequent drunkenness may be in a need of mental health assessment. As entering substance use treatment is infrequent, establishing integrated services with multi-professional co-operation for late-adolescent males with frequent drunkenness is emphasized.
PubMed ID
16396922 View in PubMed
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Adults with mild to moderate depression exhibit more alcohol related problems compared to the general adult population: a cross sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268226
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:542
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Julia Åhlin
Mats Hallgren
Agneta Öjehagen
Håkan Källmén
Yvonne Forsell
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:542
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - physiopathology
Depressive Disorder
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Alcohol use has been shown to interfere with treatment for depression, but consumption habits are not routinely screened in primary care. To date, few studies have compared the alcohol consumption habits of patients with depression to the general population. The purpose of this study was to compare alcohol habits in adults diagnosed with depression in primary care to the general adult population in Sweden.
Nine hundred fourty six patients diagnosed with mild to moderate depression, without a primary substance use disorder, in primary care settings located across Sweden completed the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Consumptions habits and alcohol related problems in the depressed sample were compared to those in the general adult population (n?=?663). Analyses were stratified by gender and age.
Ratings of alcohol problems and measures of hazardous drinking and binge drinking were significantly higher among patients seeking treatment for depression in primary care compared to the general population. Male patients scored higher on the AUDIT total and AUDIT-C (consumption) subscale than men in the general population. Compared to younger adults (aged 17-27) older depressed adults (aged 28-50 and 51-71) exhibited higher rates of consumption and problems related to alcohol.
Compared to the general adult population, consumption and problems related to alcohol use were substantially higher among patients with mild to moderate depression in primary care. Routine screening of alcohol use in primary care is recommended for patients presenting with depression.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26051511 View in PubMed
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Aggressive crime, alcohol and drug use, and concentrated poverty in 24 U.S. urban areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162146
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2007;33(4):595-603
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Avelardo Valdez
Charles D Kaplan
Russell L Curtis
Author Affiliation
Graduate School of Social Work, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4013, USA. avaldez2@uh.edu
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2007;33(4):595-603
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Poverty Areas
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Social Control, Formal
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
United States - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The nexus between substance use and aggressive crime involves a complex interrelationship among mediating individual and community-level variables. Using multilevel logistic regression models, we investigate how community-level concentration of poverty variables mediate the predictive relationships among individual level social attachment variables and substance use on aggressive crime in a large national sample of male arrestees (N = 20,602) drawn from 24 U.S. urban areas. The findings support our hypothesis that individual social attachments to marriage and the labor force (education and employment) are the principal individual-level pathway mediating the substance abuse/aggression nexus. In the random intercept model, 3.17% of the variation not explained by the individual-level predictor variables is attributable to community-level variation in urban area female-headed households and households receiving welfare. This confirms our hypothesis that social structural conditions of an urban environment differentially expose persons to conditions that predict being arrested for an aggressive crime. Our findings tend to counter the cultural theorists who argue for an indigenous culture of violence in inner-city ghettos and barrios.
Notes
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Cites: J Psychoactive Drugs. 1995 Apr-Jun;27(2):135-437562260
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1997 May;23(2):249-659143637
PubMed ID
17668345 View in PubMed
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Alcohol abuse and suicidal behaviour in young and middle aged men: differentiating between attempted and completed suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10552
Source
Addiction. 1999 Aug;94(8):1199-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
I. Rossow
A. Romelsjö
H. Leifman
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway. ingeborg.m.rossow@sifa.no
Source
Addiction. 1999 Aug;94(8):1199-207
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: To establish whether alcohol abuse as a risk factor in suicidal behaviour would be different in parasuicide compared to completed suicide, and to explore the relative impact of alcohol abuse on completed suicide among parasuicides. DESIGN: A 25-year follow-up study by linking data from military conscription, inpatient treatment and death register. PARTICIPANTS: A cohort of 46,490 Swedish male conscripts born in 1950-51. MEASUREMENTS: Psychiatric diagnosis was recorded at conscription, diagnoses related to alcohol abuse and suicidal behaviour were recorded at any inpatient treatment during follow-up, and underlying cause of death was recorded for those who died during follow-up. FINDINGS: Bivariate analyses showed alcohol abusers to have an elevated risk of attempted suicide (OR = 27.1) as well as completed suicide (OR = 4.7), but in the latter case to a significantly lesser extent. Correspondingly, alcohol abusers constituted a significantly larger proportion of the parasuicides (33.3%) than of the completed suicides (10.0%). A relatively stronger impact of alcohol abuse on parasuicide than on completed suicide remained after controlling for psychiatric co-morbidity, the adjusted odds ratios for attempted suicide and completed suicide being 8.8 and 2.4, respectively. Attempted suicide was a highly significant risk factor for completed suicide (OR = 13.5). Among those who attempted suicide, alcohol abusers were found to have a significantly lower risk of completed suicide than other suicide attempters (OR = 0.46). CONCLUSION: The significantly stronger association between alcohol abuse and attempted suicide compared to completed suicide may be viewed in the light of possible impact of intoxication and impulsiveness on non-fatal suicidal behaviour in alcohol abusers.
PubMed ID
10615735 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and drug abuse among sexual and nonsexual offenders: relationship to intimacy deficits and coping strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178703
Source
Sex Abuse. 2004 Jun;16(3):177-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Jan Looman
Jeffrey Abracen
Roberto DiFazio
Greg Maillet
Author Affiliation
Regional Treatment Centre, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Sex Abuse. 2004 Jun;16(3):177-89
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Emotions
Female
Humans
Incest - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Rape - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Three groups of subjects (N = 95) consisting or rapists, child molesters, and a comparison group of violent offenders were examined with reference to history of alcohol abuse, history of drug abuse, intimacy deficits, and emotionally based coping strategies. No differences were found between the two groups of sex offenders on any of the measures examined. Sex offenders were found to be significantly older than the comparison group. When age was entered as a covariate sex offenders were found to have significantly more difficulties with alcohol use as measured by the Michigan Alcohol Screening Test (MAST) and were significantly more likely to use emotionally based coping strategies as measured by the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS). No differences were found between any of the groups with reference to drug abuse as measured by the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST). Results are discussed in terms of Marshall's theory of intimacy deficits in sexual offenders.
PubMed ID
15326879 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and smoking behavior in chronic pain patients: the role of opioids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92152
Source
Eur J Pain. 2009 Jul;13(6):606-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Ekholm Ola
Grønbaek Morten
Peuckmann Vera
Sjøgren Per
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Pain. 2009 Jul;13(6):606-12
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Analgesics, Opioid - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Complementary Therapies
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - complications - drug therapy
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Tooth
Young Adult
Abstract
The primary aim of this epidemiological study was to investigate associations between chronic non-cancer pain with or without opioid treatment and the alcohol and smoking behavior. The secondary aims were to investigate self-reported quality of life, sleeping problems, oral health and the use of different health care providers. The Danish health survey of 2005 was based on a region-stratified random sample of 10.916 individuals. Data were collected via personal interviews and self-administrated questionnaires. Respondents suffering from chronic pain were identified through the question 'Do you have chronic/long-lasting pain lasting 6 months or more?' The question concerning alcohol intake assessed the frequency of alcohol intake and binge drinking. Smoking behavior assessed the daily number of cigarettes. Individuals reporting chronic pain were stratified into two groups (opioid users and non-opioid users). In all, 7275 individuals completed a personal interview and 5552 individuals completed and returned the self-administrated questionnaire. Responders with a self-reported earlier or present cancer diagnosis were excluded from the study. Hence, the final study population consisted of 5292 individuals. We found, that individuals suffering from chronic pain were less likely to drink alcohol. In opioid users alcohol consumption was further reduced. Cigarette smoking was significantly increased in individuals suffering from chronic pain and in opioid users smoking was further increased. Poor oral health, quality of life and sleep were markedly associated with chronic pain and opioid use. The use of opioids was associated with significantly more contacts to healthcare care providers.
PubMed ID
18774317 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and suicide in Alaska Natives

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3362
Source
American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research 1993;5(2):34-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
Kettl, P
Bixler, EO
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey Medical Center, Hershey 17033.
Source
American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research 1993;5(2):34-45
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Records
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Retrospective Studies
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A retrospective review of hospital records from the Alaska Native Medical Center, controlled for age, sex, and race, is presented for 33 Alaska Native suicide completers who died between 1980 and 1984. Suicide rates for Alaska Natives were twice the national average during the study period. The only significant differences between the suicide and control groups was the history of a prior suicide attempt (p 0.003). Alcohol abuse was diagnosed more often than any other psychiatric disorder in the suicide group and appears to be the most important antecedent of suicide in this study.
PubMed ID
8130312 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and suicide in Denmark 1911-24--experiences from a 'natural experiment'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11670
Source
Addiction. 1993 Sep;88(9):1189-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
Skog, OJ
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Addiction. 1993 Sep;88(9):1189-93
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - supply & distribution
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In 1916-17, prices of alcoholic beverages increased dramatically in Denmark, and alcohol consumption decreased strongly. On the basis of this 'natural experiment', the effect of variations in per capita alcohol consumption on suicide rates is estimated, and compared to Norström's analysis of Danish data from the period 1931-80, as well as similar analyses from other countries. It is concluded that per capita alcohol consumption is probably related to the suicide rate in Denmark, but to a less extent than in some other countries.
PubMed ID
8241918 View in PubMed
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Alcohol habits among teenagers in Sweden: factors of importance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11504
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1994 Nov;55(6):719-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
E. Persson
B S Hanson
A S Råstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Lund University, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1994 Nov;55(6):719-25
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Beverages - supply & distribution
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Environment
Social Values
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study of 689 secondary school students (13-16 years of age) in Sweden investigates the association between alcohol habits, the availability of alcohol and age, gender, socioeconomic status, ethnic origin and family structure. Data were obtained by anonymous questionnaires in 1991. The availability of alcohol increased from the seventh grade to the ninth as did the proportion of alcohol consumers and students with regular alcohol consumption. Boys in the seventh and eighth grades showed somewhat more advanced alcohol habits than girls, but in the ninth grade the opposite was seen. Students with more advanced alcohol habits and a higher availability of alcohol more often belonged to a lower socioeconomic strata and they lived more often with a single parent. Students of foreign background drank alcohol (especially wine) more regularly. An association was also found between the parents' liberal attitude toward offering alcohol at home and frequent intoxication and the students' experience of illicitly produced liquor, especially among the youngest students. In spite of the Swedish alcohol policy the availability of alcohol is rather high among young people. Special attention in alcohol preventive work should be paid to girls, young people living with one parent, young people in lower socioeconomic groups and young people of foreign origin.
PubMed ID
7861801 View in PubMed
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153 records – page 1 of 16.