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Adolescents alcohol-use and economic conditions: a multilevel analysis of data from a period with big economic changes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146664
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2010 Dec;11(6):533-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Mikael Svensson
Curt Hagquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Swedish Business School, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. mikael.svensson@oru.se
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2010 Dec;11(6):533-41
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - economics - epidemiology
Alcoholism - economics - epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - economics
Sweden
Time Factors
Unemployment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper examines how the unemployment rate is related to adolescent alcohol use and experience of binge drinking during a time period characterized by big societal changes. The paper uses repeated cross-sectional adolescent survey data from a Swedish region, collected in 1988, 1991, 1995, 1998, 2002 and 2005, and merges this with data on local unemployment rates for the same time periods. Individual level frequency of alcohol use as well as experience of binge drinking is connected to local level unemployment rate to estimate the relationship using multilevel modeling. The model includes municipality effects controlling for time-invariant differences between municipalities as well as year fixed effects controlling for municipality-invariant changes over time in alcohol use. The results show that the unemployment rate is negatively associated with adolescents' alcohol use and the experience of binge drinking. When the unemployment rate increases, more adolescents do not drink at all. Regular drinking (twice per month or more) is, on the other hand, unrelated to the unemployment rate. Examining gender-differences in the relationship, it is shown that the results are driven by behavior in girls, whereas drinking among boys does not show any significant relationship with changes in the unemployment rate.
PubMed ID
20012126 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol and alcoholism in historical and sociomedical perspective]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13102
Source
Sykepleien. 1978 Jun 20;65(10):608-13, 615
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1978

Alcohol-attributable morbidity and resulting health care costs in Canada in 2002: recommendations for policy and prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166214
Source
J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2007 Jan;68(1):36-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Benjamin Taylor
Jürgen Rehm
Jayadeep Patra
Svetlana Popova
Dolly Baliunas
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2S1, Canada.
Source
J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2007 Jan;68(1):36-47
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Alcohol-Related Disorders - economics - mortality - therapy
Alcoholism - economics - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Canada
Catchment Area (Health)
Chronic Disease
Female
Health Care Costs
Health Policy
Health status
Hospitalization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - economics
Prevalence
Abstract
Alcohol is one of the most important risk factors for burden of disease, particularly in high-income countries such as Canada. The purpose of this article was to estimate the number of hospitalizations, hospital days, and the resulting costs attributable to alcohol for Canada in 2002.
Exposure distribution was taken from the Canadian Addiction Survey and corrected for per capita consumption from production and sales. For chronic disease, risk relations were taken from the published literature and combined with exposure to calculate age- and gender-specific alcohol-attributable fractions. For injury, alcohol-attributable fractions were taken directly from available statistics. Data on the most responsible diagnosis, length of stay for hospitalizations, and costs were obtained from the national Canadian databases.
For Canada in 2002, there were 195,970 alcohol-related diagnoses among acute care hospitalizations, 2,058 alcohol-attributable psychiatric hospitalizations, and 183,589 alcohol-attributable admissions to specialized treatment centers. These accounted for 1,246,945 hospital days in acute care facilities, 54,114 hospital days in psychiatric hospitals, and 3,018,688 hospital days in specialized treatment centers (inpatient and outpatient). The main causes of alcohol-attributable morbidity were neuropsychiatric conditions, cardiovascular disease, and unintentional injuries. In total, Can. $2.29 billion were spent on alcohol-related health care.
Alcohol poses a heavy burden of disease as well as a financial strain on Canadian society. However, there are evidence-based effective and cost-effective policy and legislative interventions as well as measures to better enforce these laws.
PubMed ID
17149516 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and disability pension among middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10620
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1999 Aug;9(6):341-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
N O Månsson
L. Råstam
K F Eriksson
B. Israelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1999 Aug;9(6):341-8
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - economics
Alcoholism - economics
Disabled Persons
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyze the relation between alcohol consumption and the risk of disability pension among middle-aged men. METHODS: In the mid-seventies, complete birth-year cohorts of middle-aged male residents in Malmö, Sweden, were invited to participate in a general health survey. The 3751 men with complete data who constituted the cohort in this study were followed for 11 years. Alcohol consumption was estimated from the scores obtained from a test designed to identify subjects with alcohol related problems. RESULTS: Of the 498 men granted disability pension during follow-up, 48 stated to be teetotalers. The cumulative incidence of disability pension among teetotalers was 19%, whereas, it was 12% and 16%, respectively, among men with low and high alcohol consumption. The adjusted relative risk (RR) for acquiring a disability pension (using the group with low alcohol consumption as reference) was 1.8 among abstainers and 1.3 among men with high alcohol consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol overconsumption, as well as teetotalism, showed a positive relation to disability pension, and a moderate alcohol intake was found to be beneficial with respect to the risk of future disability pension.
PubMed ID
10475533 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption before and after a significant reduction of alcohol prices in 2004 in Finland: were the effects different across population subgroups?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145346
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2010 May-Jun;45(3):286-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
Satu Helakorpi
Pia Mäkelä
Antti Uutela
Author Affiliation
Department of Lifestyle and Participation, National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), PO Box 30, FI-00 271 Helsinki, Finland. satu.helakorpi@thl.fi
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2010 May-Jun;45(3):286-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - economics - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - economics
Alcoholism - economics - epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Education
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Population
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To examine trends in adult alcohol consumption by age, gender and education from 1982 to 2008 and evaluate the effects that a significant reduction in alcohol prices in 2004 had on alcohol consumption in different population subgroups.
The study population comprised respondents aged 25-64 (n = 79,100) replying to nationally representative annual postal surveys from 1982 to 2008 (average response rate 72%). The main measurements were the prevalence of respondents who had drunk at least eight (men) or five (women) drinks in the previous week ('moderate to heavy drinkers') and prevalence of those who weekly (men) or monthly (women) drank six or more drinks on a single occasion ('heavy episodic drinkers') (one 'drink' containing 11-13 g ethanol). Logistic models were used to test differences across population subgroups in the changes in drinking.
Following the reduction of alcohol prices in 2004, drinking increased among men and women aged 45-64. Among men, both moderate to heavy drinking and heavy episodic drinking increased in the lowest educational group. Among women, moderate to heavy drinking increased mostly in the lowest and intermediate educational groups, while the highest increases for heavy episodic drinking were in the intermediate and highest female educational groups.
Alcohol consumption increased especially among those aged 45-64 and among lower educated people following the reduction in alcohol prices in 2004 in Finland.
PubMed ID
20164044 View in PubMed
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Source
Alaska Med. 1987 Jul-Aug;29(3):116
Publication Type
Article
Author
T S Nighswander
Source
Alaska Med. 1987 Jul-Aug;29(3):116
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Alcoholism - economics - ethnology - therapy
Humans
Inuits
PubMed ID
3674334 View in PubMed
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[Alcoholism and the disability pension].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244564
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1981 Apr 27;143(18):1179-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-1981
Author
K. Lee
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1981 Apr 27;143(18):1179-82
Date
Apr-27-1981
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - economics
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions
PubMed ID
7292679 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism treatment in Canada: a review of current programs and policy issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244501
Source
Int J Addict. 1981 May;16(4):647-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1981
Author
A E Reid
Source
Int J Addict. 1981 May;16(4):647-81
Date
May-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - economics - rehabilitation - therapy
Canada
Employment
Ethnic Groups
Health Policy
Humans
Language
Ontario
Sex Factors
Abstract
An overview of the specialized alcoholism treatment field in Canada is presented based on a 1976 national survey of 338 programs. Descriptive information on these programs is presented to provide an understanding of the state of current treatment efforts and to identify emersent policy issues in this field. Programs activities are described under six headings: (1) the pattern of program development, (2) types of treatment agencies, (3) treatment capacity and utilization, (4) the characteristics of persons using treatment services, (5) approaches employed in treatment, and (6) program costs and financing of alcoholism treatment. Findings from the national study are related to three policy issues: access, quality, and cost. The need for future research aimed at these issues is discussed.
PubMed ID
7287245 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related deaths contribute to socioeconomic differentials in mortality in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9839
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2002 Dec;12(4):254-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Orjan Hemström
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm, University/Karolinska Institute, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. orjan.hemstrom@chess.su.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2002 Dec;12(4):254-62
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - economics - mortality
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Employment
Entrepreneurship
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This study aims at estimating the contribution of alcohol to socioeconomic mortality differentials in Sweden. METHODS: Data were obtained from a Census-linked Deaths Registry. Participants in the 1980 and 1990 censuses were included with a follow-up of mortality 1990-1995. Socioeconomic status was assigned from occupation in 1990 or 1980. Alcohol-related deaths were defined from underlying or contributory causes. Poison regressions were applied to compute age-adjusted mortality rate ratios for all-causes, alcohol-related and other causes among 30-79-year-olds. The contribution of alcohol to mortality differentials was calculated from absolute differences. RESULTS: Around 5% (9,547) of all deaths were alcohol-related (30-79 years). For both sexes, manual workers, lower nonmanuals, entrepreneurs and unclassifiable groups had significantly higher alcohol-related mortality than did upper nonmanuals. Male farmers had significantly lower such mortality. The contribution of alcohol to excess mortality over that of upper nonmanuals was greatest among middle-aged (40-59 years) men who were manual workers or who belonged to a group of 'unclassifiable & others' (25-35%). It was of considerable size also for middle-aged lower nonmanuals (both sexes), male entrepreneurs, female manual workers and 'unclassifiable & others'. Among men, the total contribution of alcohol (30-79 years) was estimated at 16% for manual workers, 10% for lower nonmanuals and 7% for entrepreneurs; and among women, 6% (manual workers, lower nonmanuals) and 3% (entrepreneurs). CONCLUSION: Although deaths related to alcohol were probably underreported (e.g. accidents), alcohol clearly contributes to socioeconomic mortality differentials in Sweden. The size of this contribution depends strongly on age (peak among the middle-aged) and gender (greatest among men).
PubMed ID
12506500 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related hospitalizations of elderly people. Prevalence and geographic variation in the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6168
Source
JAMA. 1993 Sep 8;270(10):1222-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-8-1993
Author
W L Adams
Z. Yuan
J J Barboriak
A A Rimm
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.
Source
JAMA. 1993 Sep 8;270(10):1222-5
Date
Sep-8-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - economics - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hospitals - utilization
Humans
Male
Medicare Part A - statistics & numerical data
Morbidity
Patient Admission - economics - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
United States - epidemiology
United States Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To determine the prevalence, geographic variation, and charges to Medicare of alcohol-related hospitalizations among elderly people in the United States. DESIGN--A cross-sectional prevalence study using 1989 hospital claims data from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA). Rates were determined using (1) hospital claims records from the HCFA's Medicare Provider Analysis and Review Record (MEDPAR) database for all Medicare Part A beneficiaries aged 65 years and older; (2) county population estimates for 1985 from the Bureau of the Census; and (3) per capita consumption of alcohol by state in 1989 as estimated by the US Department of Health and Human Services. SETTING--Data include all hospital inpatient Medicare Part A beneficiaries aged 65 years and older in the United States in 1989. RESULTS--The prevalence of alcohol-related hospitalizations among people aged 65 years and older nationally in 1989 was 54.7 per 10,000 population for men and 14.8 per 10,000 for women. Comparison with hospital records showed that MEDPAR data had a sensitivity of 77% to detect alcohol-related hospitalizations. There was considerable geographic variation; prevalence ranged from 18.9 per 10,000 in Arkansas to 77.0 per 10,000 in Alaska. A strong correlation existed between alcohol-related hospitalizations and per capita consumption of alcohol by state (Spearman correlation coefficient, .64; P
Notes
Erratum In: JAMA 1993 Nov 3;270(17):2055
PubMed ID
8355385 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.