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109 records – page 1 of 11.

The 1993 General Social Survey II: alcohol problems in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213880
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Nov-Dec;86(6):402-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
E W Single
J M Brewster
P. MacNeil
J. Hatcher
C. Trainor
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Nov-Dec;86(6):402-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Automobile Driving
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Quality of Life
Abstract
Rates and correlates of problems associated with the use of alcohol are reported from the 1993 General Social Survey in Canada. Approximately 1 in 11 drinkers (9.2%) reported that drinking has had an adverse effect on his or her social life, physical health, happiness, home life or marriage, work, or finances in the past year. The most commonly reported problems concerned physical health (5.1%), and financial position (4.7%). Approximately one in eight drinkers (12.9%) had driven a car within an hour after consuming two or more drinks in the previous year. Furthermore, more than two of every five respondents reported that they had experienced some problem due to other people's drinking. In a multivariate analysis, age, marital status, gender, religious attendance and employment status were the strongest predictors of problem drinking. The number of heavy drinking occasions is a stronger predictor of drinking problems than is overall level of consumption.
PubMed ID
8932480 View in PubMed
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Abuse of barbiturates in an alcoholic population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109029
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1971 Feb 6;104(3):219-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-6-1971

Alcohol abuse: a risk factor for surgical wound infections?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207482
Source
Am J Infect Control. 1997 Oct;25(5):381-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
A. Rantala
O P Lehtonen
J. Niinikoski
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Am J Infect Control. 1997 Oct;25(5):381-6
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surgery Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology - etiology
Survival Rate
Abstract
The incidence of postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs) is difficult to estimate because of the current trend of early discharge after surgery. Both operation-related and host factors should be taken into consideration in the prevention of SSIs. We wanted to determine the actual incidence of SSIs and evaluate the risk factors in our clinic, using an extended follow-up period of 30 days after operations.
We performed a prospective follow-up survey of SSIs over a 3.5-month period including a 1-month follow-up after discharge with written instructions and a telephone survey. The SSIs were defined according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Forty-three patient parameters were recorded, and risk factors for SSI were sought and tested by using multiple logistic regression analysis.
The follow-up was completed in 772 of 807 patients. The SSI rates in these patients were 5.3% in clean, 7.1% in clean-contaminated, 6.2% in contaminated, and 28.1% in dirty operations. Seventy-one percent of infections were not diagnosed until after discharge from the hospital. According to multiple logistic regression analysis, alcohol abuse (p
PubMed ID
9343620 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and breast cancer risk: the alcoholism paradox.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10389
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Oct;83(7):949-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
H. Kuper
W. Ye
E. Weiderpass
A. Ekbom
D. Trichopoulos
O. Nyrén
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention, Harvard University, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Oct;83(7):949-51
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A population-based cohort study of 36 856 women diagnosed with alcoholism in Sweden between 1965 and 1995 found that alcoholic women had only a small 15% increase in breast-cancer incidence compared to the general female population. It is therefore apparent, contrary to expectation, that alcoholism does not increase breast-cancer risk in proportion to presumed ethanol intake.
PubMed ID
10970699 View in PubMed
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Source
Health Rep. 2004;15 Suppl:9-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Michael Tjepkema
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Toronto, Ontario. Michael.Tjepkema@statcan.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2004;15 Suppl:9-19
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cluster analysis
Depression - complications - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
This article estimates the prevalence of alcohol and illicit drug dependence among Canadians aged 15 or older Comorbidity with depression is examined.
The data are from the 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey: Mental Health and Well-being and the National Population Health Survey.
Cross-tabulations were used to estimate the prevalence of alcohol and illicit drug dependence by selected characteristics. Multiple logistic regression models were used to determine if associations persisted after controlling for potentially confounding factors, and to test temporal relationships between frequent heavy drinking and depression.
In 2002, an estimated 641,000 people (2.6% of the household population aged 15 or older) were dependent on alcohol, and 194,000 (0.8%), on illicit drugs. These people had elevated levels of depression compared with the general population. Heavy drinking more than once a week was a risk factor for a new episode of depression, and depression was a risk factor for new cases of frequent heavy drinking.
PubMed ID
15748041 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol consumption and its connection with mortality from cardiovascular diseases in 40-59 years old men (data from 21.5 year prospective study)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181560
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(12):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
A L Aleksandri
V V Konstantinov
A D Deev
A V Kapustina
D B Shestov
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(12):8-12
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Random Allocation
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
To study contribution of alcohol consumption (AC) to mortality of coronary heart disease (CHD), cerebral stroke (CS), cardiovascular diseases (CVD), overall mortality (OM) in a random population of working males.
The results are available of a 21.5 year cohort study of mortality in a random population of 7,815 male citizens of Moscow and St-Petersburg aged 40-59 years.
The attributive risk of AC for mortality of CHD, CS, CVD and OM was 16.6, 14.8, 7.7 and 11.9%, respectively. The lowest relative risk to die of CHD, CVD and OM among the cohort studied was observed in males taking alcohol 168.0 ml per week maximum.
It is necessary to approach differentially to assessment of AC effects on development of many diseases and further investigations are needed to reveal fine mechanisms of action of different alcohol drinks on human organism.
PubMed ID
14959460 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption in the country and hospitalizations for acute alcohol pancreatitis and liver cirrhosis during a 20-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153152
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2009 May-Jun;44(3):321-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Juhani Sand
Anu Välikoski
Isto Nordback
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Division of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. Juhani.Sand@pshp.fi
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2009 May-Jun;44(3):321-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - therapy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis, Alcoholic - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
Between 1970 and 1989 the incidence of pancreatitis increased in Finland in association with increased alcohol consumption. During the1990s there was a temporary decrease in alcohol consumption. We examined the trends in the amount of alcohol consumed in Finland and the incidence of hospital admissions for acute alcoholic pancreatitis and liver cirrhosis.
The data on hospital admissions and annual alcohol consumption between 1987 and 2007 were obtained from the Finnish National Agency for Welfare and Health.
Alcohol consumption increased from 8.2 litres of ethanol per inhabitant per year in 1987 to 10.5 litres in 2007, but during the economic recession in the country there was a temporary decrease in alcohol consumption between 1992 and 1994, with the lowest consumption of 8.0 litres in 1994. The incidence of hospitalizations for acute alcoholic pancreatitis in the whole population increased significantly during the study period among both men (from 57 to 69/100,000/year) and women (from 7 to 12/100,000/year). However, there was a significant decrease in hospitalizations in 1996 and 1997 correlating with alcohol consumption three years earlier. The incidence of hospitalizations due to liver cirrhosis increased in the age groups over 45 years in both genders throughout the study period. A temporary decrease was observed in 1994, when alcohol consumption was at its lowest. Interestingly, there was a trend from pancreatitis to cirrhosis during the last six years, when the hospitalizations for acute pancreatitis decreased, although the hospitalizations for liver cirrhosis increased following increased alcohol consumption. During the study period the female-to-male ratio for liver cirrhosis was twice as high as for acute alcoholic pancreatitis, but the relative portion of females increased by 50% in both diagnoses.
In contrast to liver cirrhosis, the hospital admissions for which followed the national alcohol consumption, admissions for acute alcoholic pancreatitis ceased to show a connection with the national alcohol consumption during the past several years.
PubMed ID
19144980 View in PubMed
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Alcohol dependence and depression among heavy drinkers in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174975
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Oct;61(8):1658-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Jennifer Lukassen
Marie P Beaudet
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ont., Canada K1A 0T6.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Oct;61(8):1658-67
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Depression - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
This article describes the prevalence of heavy drinking among the Canadian population and the prevalence of alcohol dependence among heavy drinkers aged 18 or older. It also examines the association of depression to alcohol dependence among the latter group and the correlates of depression and alcohol dependence comorbidity. The data are from a national representative sample of the Canadian population in 2000/01. One in five current drinkers aged 18 or older was classified as a regular heavy drinker. This constituted a significant increase of approximately 2% in the prevalence of heavy drinking from 1996/97 to 2000/01 in Canada (p
PubMed ID
15869834 View in PubMed
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109 records – page 1 of 11.