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543 records – page 1 of 55.

[31 women with drug problems got children--what happened after that?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9974
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2001
Author
A. Sundfaer
Author Affiliation
Barne- og ungdomspsykiatrisk poliklinikk Ullevål sykehus 0407 Oslo. bupull@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):73-5
Date
Jan-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Child
Child Behavior
Child Development
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - psychology
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The intention of this study was to increase the knowledge concerning the rehabilitation of women with drug problems after the birth of a child and to find out how the children developed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A follow-up study of 31 women, former drug and alcohol abusers and their children, 19 girls and 12 boys born in 1982-1983. The first survey took place when the children were 2-3 years of age, then when they were 7-9 and at last when they were 15-17. The biological mothers, foster or adoptive mothers, the children and their teachers were interviewed. RESULTS: The women got more support and control during the pregnancy than afterwards. Most of the mothers became single. Women with the shortest drug history, a good social network and a stable partner without drug problems kept the care of their children. By the first survey (1985), seven children had been placed in foster homes, in the second (1992) two further children had been taken away from their mothers, and in the third (1999) only one third of the children were living with their biological mothers. Most of the children did well at school and in their families, had friends and leisure activities despite still living by their mothers or in foster/adoption homes. None of the youngsters had been in conflict with the law or were drug abusers, but every second teenage girl needed psychological support. Children who had been stable by their drug-free biological mothers functioned best. INTERPRETATION: Mothers with drug problems do not get sufficient attention after the delivery and when the children grow up. A supporting family should be brought in contact with mother and child after the delivery. Under special circumstances pregnancy can be a positive turning point for women with drug problems.
PubMed ID
12013619 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 1993 General Social Survey II: alcohol problems in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213880
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Nov-Dec;86(6):402-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
E W Single
J M Brewster
P. MacNeil
J. Hatcher
C. Trainor
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Nov-Dec;86(6):402-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Automobile Driving
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Quality of Life
Abstract
Rates and correlates of problems associated with the use of alcohol are reported from the 1993 General Social Survey in Canada. Approximately 1 in 11 drinkers (9.2%) reported that drinking has had an adverse effect on his or her social life, physical health, happiness, home life or marriage, work, or finances in the past year. The most commonly reported problems concerned physical health (5.1%), and financial position (4.7%). Approximately one in eight drinkers (12.9%) had driven a car within an hour after consuming two or more drinks in the previous year. Furthermore, more than two of every five respondents reported that they had experienced some problem due to other people's drinking. In a multivariate analysis, age, marital status, gender, religious attendance and employment status were the strongest predictors of problem drinking. The number of heavy drinking occasions is a stronger predictor of drinking problems than is overall level of consumption.
PubMed ID
8932480 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absence of the A1252G mutation in alpha 1-antichymotrypsin in a North American population suffering from dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209447
Source
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 1997 Feb;17(2):233-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
B M Gilfix
L. Briones
Author Affiliation
Division of Medical Genetics, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 1997 Feb;17(2):233-5
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - complications
Alleles
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - chemically induced - classification - epidemiology - genetics
Dementia, Vascular - epidemiology - genetics
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Male
Point Mutation
Polymorphism, Genetic
Quebec - epidemiology
alpha 1-Antichymotrypsin - deficiency - genetics
Abstract
Associations have been reported between polymorphisms in the gene for alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) and both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease. An A-to-G substitution at nucleotide position 1,252 of ACT that produces a methionine to valine substitution at codon 389 has been found previously in four of 32 individuals with cerebrovascular disease from a Japanese population. We genotyped 194 individuals [59 controls, 35 with non-AD-type dementia (primarily vascular) and 100 with Alzheimer's-type dementia] for this polymorphism and found none that carry this polymorphism. Therefore, the allelic association of the A1252G mutation of ACT with cerebrovascular disease may be confined to the Japanese population and is not generalizable to other populations.
PubMed ID
9040504 View in PubMed
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Abuse of alcohol in sudden out-of-hospital deaths in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218488
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Apr;18(2):255-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
M. Perola
E. Vuori
A. Penttilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Apr;18(2):255-60
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - mortality
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Death, Sudden - epidemiology - etiology
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Ethanol - pharmacokinetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Liver Diseases, Alcoholic - complications - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Alcoholism is known to be greatly underdiagnosed in death certificates, a fact that biases in estimates of alcohol-related mortality. An autopsy series of 1658 cases (920 with natural cause of death and 738 nonnatural) was reviewed to evaluate the extent of this bias, and also to see how well different sources of information served as indicators of alcoholism when alcohol-related disease diagnosed at autopsy was considered as a gold standard. A stepwise logistic regression model adjusted by age and sex showed police reports of individual's alcohol usage and blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of > 2.9/1000 at autopsy to be the two most significant predictors of chronic alcohol abuse (p 2.9/1000), due to its high specificity, as particularly suggestive of chronic heavy drinking. However, it is wise to use these parameters only as an aid in decision-making, not as sole indicators of alcoholism. Deaths associated with chronic heavy drinking were frequent, 50.5% of the total series (male 56.4%, female 37.1%). For all but one age-group (male 45-64 years), however, death certificates mentioned alcohol-related diseases in less than half of these cases. Especially evident underdiagnosis was found for female and males 65 years and older. These results indicate that alcoholism is frequent in such a highly selected population as a series of forensic autopsies and suggest that estimates of prevalence of alcoholism based only on review of death certificates are to be considered with great caution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8048723 View in PubMed
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Abuse of barbiturates in an alcoholic population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109029
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1971 Feb 6;104(3):219-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-6-1971

Abusers of alcohol immediately prior to pension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12864
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1983 Jul;68(1):44-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
M. Elton
J O Hörnquist
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1983 Jul;68(1):44-54
Date
Jul-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Brain Damage, Chronic - chemically induced
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Liver Function Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
In the granting of a disability pension to an alcohol abuser society is taking a somewhat controversial step. In order to elucidate the overall situation of these abusers, the quality of life of 61 abusing applicants was examined. The sample represents all 78 first-time applicants during an 18-month period in a geographically defined region in the county of Ostergötland in Sweden. As expected, apart from their extensive abuse, the applicants were in bad psychiatric-psychological condition and demonstrated severe neuro-psychological and biochemical disturbances. In addition, their social network was somewhat restricted and also otherwise rather problematic. These deviations were evident in relation to a matched group of newly pensioned non-abusers. In comparison with another more closely matched group of abusers undergoing rehabilitation, the differences appeared mainly within the psychiatric-psychological sphere. This is a report in a series from the research project "Abuse of alcohol - Disability pension - Quality of life".
PubMed ID
6613619 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accelerated senescence of armed conflicts participants suffering from the consequences of war cranial-cerebral trauma and alcoholism].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160567
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2007;20(1):112-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
V S Miakotnykh
V V Iampol'skaia
V N Samoilova
A A Bal'bert
T A Borovkova
V N Meshchaninov
O N Matveeva
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2007;20(1):112-7
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging, Premature - diagnosis - etiology
Alcoholism - complications
Antioxidants - analysis - metabolism
Brain Injuries - complications
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Lipid Peroxidation
Male
Middle Aged
Russia
War
Abstract
The matter under studies was the way accelerated senescence of armed conflicts participants with brain injuries depends on alcohol addiction developed after the injuries and on dysfunction of neurohumoral regulation of heart activity. It has been established that the posttraumatic alcohol addiction considerably activates the processes of accelerated senescence and lipid peroxidation connected with it, depresses the system of antioxidant protection and enhances the progress of dysfunctions in neurohumoral regulation of heart activity.
PubMed ID
17969594 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental deaths from asphyxia. A 10-year retrospective study from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36336
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1993 Mar;14(1):74-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
P. Flobecker
J. Ottosson
L. Johansson
M A Hietala
C. Gezelius
A. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1993 Mar;14(1):74-9
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Accidents, Occupational
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - complications
Asphyxia - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Paraphilias - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Accidental mechanical asphyxia is an unusual cause of death. In reviewing 73 cases occurring during a 10-year-period in Sweden, young boys and elderly women seemed to be most prone to this type of fatality. A striking number of victims had deliberately put a noose-like structure around the neck, and yet another group became entangled in some part of their clothing. Thoracic immobilization was seen in a number of cases, also involving work-related accidents. Hospitalized patients, asphyxiophilics and inebriated victims represent other risk groups. A case involving the use of a helmet is reported in view of the growing frequency with which Swedish children use bicycle helmets. The material contains only a few cases where the victim was not alone at the time of the accident, and it seems plausible that supervision could have prevented many of the reported fatalities. Public knowledge of accident mechanisms may increase the awareness of hazardous situations and activities. Spreading of the medical examiner's knowledge may thus form a basis for accident prevention.
PubMed ID
8493976 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of hospital discharge data: five alcohol-related diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241386
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 1983 Dec;12(4):315-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Author
K. Poikolainen
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 1983 Dec;12(4):315-22
Date
Dec-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholic Intoxication - diagnosis
Alcoholism - complications - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Hospital records
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - diagnosis
Male
Medical Records
Pancreatitis - etiology
Patient Discharge
Psychoses, Alcoholic - diagnosis
Records as Topic
Abstract
Accuracy of hospital discharge register data was studied by comparing 954 randomly selected abstracts to the respective medical records. The average percentages of agreement were: date of birth 98, date of admission 96, date of discharge 94, area of residence 93, principal diagnosis 91, disposition on discharge 89, marital status 84, third diagnosis 83, second diagnosis 76, social group 74, occupation 60, and source of admission 49. Accuracy of items was not related to alcohol etiology. An analysis of variance indicated that the number of items in agreement varied by both diagnosis and type of hospital.
PubMed ID
6671415 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A cross-sectional study at a somatic hospital in Gothenburg: Every 4th hospitalized man is an alcoholic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237129
Source
Lakartidningen. 1986 Apr 30;83(18):1670-1, 1674
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1986

543 records – page 1 of 55.