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2,3-Butanediol in plasma from an alcoholic mistakenly identified as ethylene glycol by gas-chromatographic analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12006
Source
Clin Chem. 1991 Aug;37(8):1453-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
A W Jones
L. Nilsson
S A Gladh
K. Karlsson
J. Beck-Friis
Author Affiliation
Department of Alcohol Toxicology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Clin Chem. 1991 Aug;37(8):1453-5
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - blood
Butylene Glycols - blood - pharmacokinetics
Chromatography, Gas
Diagnostic Errors
Ethylene Glycol
Ethylene Glycols - blood - poisoning
Flame Ionization
Humans
Male
Abstract
2,3-Butanediol was mistakenly identified as ethylene glycol in plasma specimens from two alcoholic patients. The cyclic phenylboronate ester derivatives of 2,3-butanediol and ethylene glycol had the same retention time when OV-17 was used as the stationary phase for gas chromatography. This led to incorrect diagnosis of ethylene glycol poisoning and unnecessary invasive therapy. Plasma from two chronic alcoholics contained 2,3-butanediol at 3.5 and 3.4 mmol/L. The elimination half-life of 2,3-butanediol was 3.9 days when ethanol was administered during therapy for suspected ethylene glycol poisoning. Low concentrations of 2,3-butanediol might be present in blood of chronic alcoholics as a result of a novel pathway of intermediary metabolism associated with some forms of alcoholism. However, a more likely explanation for fairly high concentrations of 2,3-butanediol is enzymatic production from 2-butanone. This ketone occurs in denatured alcohol preparations often consumed by alcoholics in Sweden.
PubMed ID
1868611 View in PubMed
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Alaskan and Siberian studies on alcoholic behavior and genetic predisposition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12112
Source
Pages 474-477 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
  1 document  
Author
B. Segal
L K Duffy
S A Kurilovitch
A V Avksentyuk
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Source
Pages 474-477 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - blood - genetics
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Siberia
PubMed ID
1365197 View in PubMed
Documents
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Alcohol and driving factors in collision risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141395
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2010 Nov;42(6):1538-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Robert E Mann
Gina Stoduto
Evelyn Vingilis
Mark Asbridge
Christine M Wickens
Anca Ialomiteanu
Justin Sharpley
Reginald G Smart
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Social and Epidemiological Research, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2S1, Canada. robert mann@camh.net
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2010 Nov;42(6):1538-44
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication - blood - epidemiology
Alcoholism - blood - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Ontario
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
In this study we examine the effect of several alcohol-related measures on self-reported collision involvement within the previous 12 months while controlling for demographic and driving exposure factors based on a large representative sample of adults in Ontario. Data are based on the 2002-2006 Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Monitor, an ongoing cross-sectional telephone survey of Ontario adults aged 18 and older (n=8542). Three logistic regressions of self-reported collision involvement in the past 12 months were implemented, each consisting of 3 steps: (1) demographic factors and driving exposure entered, (2) driving after drinking within the last 12 months entered, and (3) one of three alcohol-related measures (AUDIT subscales of alcohol consumption, dependence and problems) entered. In each step, measures from the preceding step were included in order to control for those variables. In Step 1, age (OR=0.989), region overall, Central East region (OR=0.71), West region (OR=0.67), and North region (OR=0.67), income overall and those who did not state income (OR=0.64), marital status overall and those married or living common law (OR=0.60), and number of kilometers driven in a typical week (OR=1.00) were found to be significant predictors of collision involvement. The analyses revealed that driving after drinking was a significant predictor of collision involvement in Step 2 (OR=1.51) and each of the Step 3 models (ORs=1.52, 1.37, 1.34). The AUDIT Consumption subscale was not a significant factor in collision risk. Both the AUDIT Dependence and AUDIT Problems subscales were significantly related to collision risk (ORs=1.13 and 1.10, respectively). These findings suggest that alcohol, in addition to its effects on collision risk through its acute impairment of driving skills, may also affect collision risk through processes involved when individuals develop alcohol problems or alcohol dependence.
PubMed ID
20728600 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and stroke: pathophysiologic mechanisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10808
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1998;17(6):281-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
M. Hillbom
H. Numminen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Oulu, Finland. matti.hillbom@oulu.fi
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1998;17(6):281-7
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - physiopathology
Alcoholism - blood - complications - physiopathology
Animals
Cerebrovascular Disorders - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Ethanol - pharmacology
Humans
Abstract
Epidemiological evidence indicates that recent heavy alcohol consumption increases the risk for all major types of stroke, whereas light-to-moderate alcohol intake is associated with a decreased risk of ischemic stroke. Although heavy drinking elevates blood pressure, there is no firm evidence to indicate that alcohol consumption causes the formation of aneurysms, microaneurysms or other lesions in human arteries. Alcohol has been reported to precipitate vasoconstriction and rupture of small cerebral arteries in experimental animals. Alcohol-induced neck trauma has been shown to precipitate traumatic strokes, and alcohol-induced cardiac arrhythmias have been observed in patients with embolic brain infarction. The effects of alcohol on hemostasis, fibrinolysis and blood clotting are variable and could either prevent or promote the occurrence of strokes. The antiatherogenic effects of regular light-to-moderate alcohol consumption could be mediated by inhibition of low-density lipoprotein oxidation, and by elevated estrogen levels.
PubMed ID
9778594 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and unnatural deaths in Sweden: a medico-legal autopsy study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10406
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2000 Jul;61(4):507-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
H. Sjögren
A. Eriksson
K. Ahlm
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2000 Jul;61(4):507-14
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - blood - mortality
Alcoholism - blood - mortality
Analysis of Variance
Automobile Driving - statistics & numerical data
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Death, Sudden - epidemiology
Female
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate alcohol involvement in all types of unnatural deaths in Sweden. METHOD: All cases of unnatural death that underwent medico-legal autopsies (1992-1996) in Sweden were analyzed (N = 15,630; i.e., 68% of all unnatural deaths). Alcohol was regarded as contributing to the death if: (1) there was any indication that the deceased was a "known alcoholic"; (2) the underlying or contributing causes of death were alcohol-related; (3) the deceased had alcohol-related inpatient diagnosis during a period of 3 years prior to death; or (4) the case tested positive for blood alcohol. RESULTS: Thirty-nine percent of the blood-tested cases (n = 13,099) were positive for alcohol. Almost 40% of the unnatural deaths were associated with alcohol. Alcohol involvement was most common in the intoxication group (84%), followed by the "undetermined" (65%), homicide (55%), fall (48%), fire (44%), asphyxia (41%), suicide (35%) and traffic (22%) groups. More than half (52%) of the deaths in the age group 30-60 years, 35% of those aged 0-29 years and 25% of those aged 60 and over were associated with alcohol. CONCLUSIONS: In Sweden, two of five unnatural deaths are associated with alcohol; this is a conservative estimate. Alcohol-associated mortality varies considerably between different groups of external causes of death, between men and women, and with age.
PubMed ID
10928720 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol consumption among convicted drivers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11822
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Oct 20;112(25):3216-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1992
Author
J. Ruud
H. Gjerde
Author Affiliation
Stange Helsesenter.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Oct 20;112(25):3216-20
Date
Oct-20-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - blood - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholism - blood - prevention & control - psychology
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
English Abstract
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prisoners - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
150 males imprisoned for drunken driving were assessed by means of a questionnaire and medical examination. The objectives were to study alcohol consumption and frequency of alcohol-related problems. Half of the assessed persons were less than 30 years of age. 62% had a blood alcohol concentration > 1.50%. 36% had previously been convicted for drunken driving. Average alcohol consumption was 58 gram per day. 40% of the convicted persons reported a consumption of more than 40 gram alcohol per day. Corrected for under-reporting the consumption was even higher. The CAGE questionnaire was positive in 54%, indicating an alcohol-related problem. GGT (gamma-glutamyltransferase) was elevated in 23% and CDT (carbohydrate deficient transferrin) in 35%. This study indicates that 50-60% of convicted drunken drivers were excessive drinkers or/and had alcohol-related problems. Imprisonment and fines seem to have a limited impact on occurrence of drunken driving. Other strategies are discussed.
PubMed ID
1462298 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption profile by time in middle-aged men: a longitudinal study based on three different diagnostic instruments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202904
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1999 Jan-Feb;34(1):65-70
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Seppä
T. Pitkäjärvi
P. Sillanaukee
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Medical School, and Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1999 Jan-Feb;34(1):65-70
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - blood - diagnosis
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Abstract
This longitudinal study aimed at comparing aggregate measures of heavy or problem drinking and their variations across time among the same subjects. We examined middle-aged men participating in a health survey over a 5-year interval. Of the 133 consecutive men in the whole age group interviewed as 40-year-olds in 1989, 114 were reached and re-interviewed in 1994. Alcohol consumption was measured by self-report, Malmo-modified Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (Mm-MAST), and serum carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT). Self-reported alcohol consumption decreased with years (142 vs 105 g/week, P = 0.01), as did CDT (16.9 vs 14.4 U/l, P = 0.02), but there was no change in the Mm-MAST results. There was no significant difference in the number of heavy drinkers (either Mm-MAST score > or = 3, or by self-reported alcohol consumption > or = 280 g/week, or by CDT > or = 20 U/l) at 40 and 45 years of age (37 and 47% respectively). At the individual level, alcohol consumption both increased and decreased with age. At 45 years of age 5/114 (4%) of the men reported that they had increased their alcohol consumption by more than 80 g/week and 25/114 (22%) said that they had reduced their drinking by the same amount. The remaining 84 (74%) reported drinking the same amount as 5 years earlier (+/- 80 g/week). This indicates that alcohol drinking habits are not stable in middle age. Most heavy drinkers in both age groups were detected by Mm-MAST and this proportion increased with age while the proportion of positive self-reports and CDTs decreased. Thus, the social consequences, measured here by the Mm-MAST, may be more readily experienced with years even at smaller consumption levels.
PubMed ID
10075404 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;223(2):119-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
N. Milman
N. Graudal
P. Strøm
M B Franzmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine B, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;223(2):119-24
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis, Alcoholic - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Liver - pathology
Liver Function Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In the period 1970-1984 alcoholic hepatitis was diagnosed by liver biopsy in 52 females. Thirty-six patients with cirrhosis were generally in a worse clinical and biochemical state than those without cirrhosis. Biochemical tests for liver function showed significant improvement from admission to the time of liver biopsy. At follow-up liver function tests were generally better in patients who had stopped drinking alcohol compared to those who continued to do so. The 5-year survival rate was 82% for females without cirrhosis, and 45% for those with cirrhosis (p less than 0.03). Considering the sex-related differences in alcohol abuse in the general population we found no evidence of increased susceptibility to the hepatotoxic effect of alcohol in females.
PubMed ID
3348109 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and risk for endometrial cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10205
Source
Int J Cancer. 2001 Jul 15;93(2):299-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2001
Author
E. Weiderpass
W. Ye
L A Mucci
O. Nyrén
D. Trichopoulos
H. Vainio
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2001 Jul 15;93(2):299-301
Date
Jul-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - blood
Alcoholism - blood - complications
Cohort Studies
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Estrogens - blood
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Endogenous estrogens increase the risk of endometrial cancer and are also elevated among women with high alcoholic intake. It is incompletely known, however, whether alcohol intake in general and alcohol abuse in particular increases risk for endometrial cancer. We thus analyzed prospectively the risk for endometrial cancer among 36,856 women hospitalized with alcoholism between 1965 and 1994 through linkages between several national Swedish registers. Compared with the general population, women who were alcoholics had an overall 24% lower risk of developing endometrial cancer, a finding challenging our a priori hypothesis. However, among women below the age of 50 years at follow-up, the mean age of menopause among Swedish women, the risk was 70% higher, whereas the risk among women aged 50 years or more at follow-up was 40% lower compared with the general population. Hence, the effect of alcoholism on endometrial cancer appears to be age dependent.
PubMed ID
11410881 View in PubMed
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83 records – page 1 of 9.