Skip header and navigation

Refine By

32 records – page 1 of 4.

[Alcohol and road traffic in Canada--legal control and methods of determining alcohol].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232244
Source
Blutalkohol. 1988 Nov;25(6):380-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988

Alcohol email assessment and feedback study dismantling effectiveness for university students (AMADEUS-1): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124868
Source
Trials. 2012;13(1):49
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jim McCambridge
Preben Bendtsen
Marcus Bendtsen
Per Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Public Health & Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 15-17 Tavistock Place, London, WC1H 9SH, UK. Jim.McCambridge@lshtm.ac.uk
Source
Trials. 2012;13(1):49
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - prevention & control - psychology
Deception
Electronic Mail
Feedback, Psychological
Humans
Patient Selection
Preventive Health Services
Questionnaires
Research Design
Risk Reduction Behavior
Risk-Taking
Student Health Services
Students - psychology
Sweden
Therapy, Computer-Assisted
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Alcohol causes huge problems for population health and for society, which require interventions with individuals as well as populations to prevent and reduce harms. Brief interventions can be effective and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk groups such as students. The research literature on the effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly and is confronted by methodological challenges common to other areas of e-health including attrition and assessment reactivity and in the design of control conditions.
The study aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, employing a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design that takes account of baseline assessment reactivity, and other possible effects of the research process. Outcomes will be evaluated after 3 months both among student populations as a whole including for a randomized no contact control group and among those who are risky drinkers randomized to brief assessment and feedback (routine practice) or to brief assessment only. A three-arm parallel groups trial will also allow exploration of the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The trial will be undertaken simultaneously in 2 universities randomizing approximately 15,300 students who will all be blinded to trial participation. All participants will be offered routine practice intervention at the end of the study.
This trial informs the development of routine service delivery in Swedish universities and more broadly contributes a new approach to the study of the effectiveness of online interventions in student populations, with relevance to behaviors other than alcohol consumption. The use of blinding and deception in this study raise ethical issues that warrant further attention.
ISRCTN28328154.
Notes
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2000 Jan;61(1):55-6310627097
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(4):e9622100793
Cites: J Dent Educ. 2002 Oct;66(10):1129-3512449206
Cites: Addiction. 2004 Nov;99(11):1410-715500594
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1979 May 31;300(22):1242-5431682
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Mar;88(3):315-358461850
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Jun;88(6):791-8048329970
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Feb 5-11;365(9458):519-3015705462
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 May 9;165(9):986-9515883236
Cites: Prev Med. 2005 Sep-Oct;41(3-4):761-616120456
Cites: Addict Behav. 2006 May;31(5):777-8715996827
Cites: Contemp Clin Trials. 2006 Aug;27(4):305-1916455306
Cites: J Am Coll Health. 2006 Sep-Oct;55(2):83-917017304
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2007 Jan-Feb;42(1):28-3617130139
Cites: Addiction. 2007 Jan;102(1):62-7017207124
Cites: Prev Sci. 2007 Mar;8(1):83-817136461
Cites: Addict Behav. 2007 Nov;32(11):2495-50817658695
Cites: Addiction. 2008 Feb;103(2):241-818199302
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007;7:30617963483
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2008 Mar 10;168(5):530-618332300
Cites: Health Psychol. 2008 Mar;27(2):179-8418377136
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:6918377650
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2008 Jul 1;96(1-2):121-718406079
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2008 Nov-Dec;43(6):669-7418693217
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2009 Feb 1;100(1-2):107-1419041196
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 Jan;28(1):18-2419320671
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2009;11(2):e919403465
Cites: Br J Soc Psychol. 2009 Jun;48(Pt 2):221-3618793492
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 May 28;360(22):2373-4; author reply 2374-519484822
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 May;28(3):301-2319489992
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jun 27;373(9682):2223-3319560604
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(3):CD00674819588402
Cites: Addiction. 2009 Aug;104(8):1311-219624324
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009;9:22919594906
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2009 Sep 14;169(16):1508-1419752409
Cites: Addiction. 2009 Nov;104(11):1807-1919744139
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2010 May-Jun;45(3):258-6220150170
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2010 May-Jun;45(3):263-7020236990
Cites: Addiction. 2010 Aug;105(8):1381-9020528806
Cites: Addiction. 2010 Jun;105(6):954-920121717
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2010 Sep;29(5):498-50720887573
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2010 Nov;29(6):617-2220973846
Cites: Addiction. 2011 Feb;106(2):267-8221083832
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010;10:78121176233
Cites: BMJ. 2011;342:d4021300711
Cites: Trials. 2011;12(1):4221320316
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(1):e2621371988
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(3):e1474021408060
Cites: Addict Behav. 2011 Jun;36(6):654-921316157
Cites: Addiction. 2011 Oct;106(10):1748-5621518068
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e2374821998626
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e2522322039407
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2000 Nov;61(6):787-9311188483
PubMed ID
22540638 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol prevention at sporting events: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285143
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Jun 06;16:471
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-06-2016
Author
Natalie Durbeej
Tobias H Elgán
Camilla Jalling
Johanna Gripenberg
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Jun 06;16:471
Date
Jun-06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control
Alcoholic Intoxication - prevention & control
Commerce - legislation & jurisprudence
Control Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Licensure
Male
Middle Aged
Sports
Sweden
Violence - prevention & control
Abstract
Alcohol intoxication and overserving of alcohol at sporting events are of great concern, given the relationships between alcohol consumption, public disturbances, and violence. During recent years this matter has been on the agenda for Swedish policymakers, authorities and key stakeholders, with demands that actions be taken. There is promising potential for utilizing an environmental approach to alcohol prevention as a strategy to reduce the level of alcohol intoxication among spectators at sporting events. Examples of prevention strategies may be community mobilization, Responsible Beverage Service training, policy work, and improved controls and sanctions. This paper describes the design of a quasi-experimental control group study to examine the effects of a multi-component community-based alcohol intervention at matches in the Swedish Premier Football League.
A baseline assessment was conducted during 2015 and at least two follow-up assessments will be conducted in 2016 and 2017. The two largest cities in Sweden are included in the study, with Stockholm as the intervention area and Gothenburg as the control area. The setting is Licensed Premises (LP) inside and outside Swedish football arenas, in addition to arena entrances. Spectators are randomly selected and invited to participate in the study by providing a breath alcohol sample as a proxy for Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC). Actors are hired and trained by an expert panel to act out a standardized scene of severe pseudo-intoxication. Four types of cross-sectional data are generated: (i) BAC levels among?=?4 200 spectators, frequency of alcohol service to pseudo-intoxicated patrons attempting to purchase alcohol at LP (ii) outside the arenas (=200 attempts) and (iii) inside the arenas (= 200 attempts), and (iv) frequency of security staff interventions towards pseudo-intoxicated patrons attempting to enter the arenas (= 200 attempts).
There is an urgent need nationally and internationally to reduce alcohol-related problems at sporting events, and it is essential to test prevention strategies to reduce intoxication levels among spectators. This project makes an important contribution not only to the research community, but also to enabling public health officials, decision-makers, authorities, the general public, and the sports community, to implement appropriate evidence-based strategies.
Notes
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013 Apr 1;129(1-2):110-523102731
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1999 Jul-Aug;114(4):337-4210501134
Cites: Addiction. 2008 Mar;103(3):405-13; discussion 414-518190669
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Jun 4;377(9781):1962-7521561649
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2015 Jul;34(4):447-5725735650
Cites: Addict Behav. 2000 Nov-Dec;25(6):843-5911125775
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2015 Jun;39(3):210-525376732
Cites: J Am Coll Health. 2001 Sep;50(2):81-811590987
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2013 Nov;32(6):561-523992424
Cites: BMJ Open. 2012 Apr 06;2(2):e00064522492431
Cites: Forensic Sci Int. 2013 Oct 10;232(1-3):125-3024053873
Cites: Eval Rev. 1997 Apr;21(2):246-6710183277
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1987 Aug;77(8):952-43605473
Cites: Health Place. 2011 Mar;17(2):508-1821257334
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2006 Nov;25(6):537-5117132572
Cites: Addiction. 2002 Jul;97(7):901-712133129
Cites: Eval Rev. 2006 Feb;30(1):44-6516394186
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Sep;88(9):1195-2038241919
Cites: Addiction. 2013 Apr;108(4):701-923134431
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2008 Nov;32(11):1859-6418715280
Cites: Addiction. 1997 Jun;92 Suppl 2:S237-499231447
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2012 Feb;36(1):55-6022313707
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 1996 Jun;20(3):290-58768420
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2011 Apr;35(4):689-9421223305
Cites: Addiction. 2010 Jun;105(6):1032-4020219058
Cites: Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2012 Feb 09;7:722321198
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2007 Dec;17(6):618-2317387105
Cites: Prev Sci. 2004 Dec;5(4):221-915566048
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2005 Nov;66(6):806-1416459942
Cites: Addiction. 2013 Jan;108(1):89-9622775309
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2003 Mar;27(3):477-8412658114
Cites: Syst Rev. 2016 Jan 21;5:1226791417
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 1998 May;31(5):629-329581147
Cites: Addiction. 2011 Nov;106(11):1997-200421749523
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 2007;42(12-13):1883-9818075915
Cites: Behav Res Methods. 2007 May;39(2):175-9117695343
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2006 Jul;30(7):1194-916792567
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Mar;64(2):270-712713202
PubMed ID
27267058 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol use and its control in Finnish and Soviet marriages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229314
Source
Br J Addict. 1990 Apr;85(4):509-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
M. Holmila
H. Mustonen
E. Rannik
Author Affiliation
Social Research Institute of Alcohol Studies, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br J Addict. 1990 Apr;85(4):509-20
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - prevention & control
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Estonia
Female
Finland
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Male
Marriage
Abstract
The paper reports the results of a comparative study conducted in Finland and in Estonia. A representative sample of young couples were interviewed in both countries. Husbands in both countries usually drink more often than their wives and are less dependent on their spouses' drinking company. Wives are more likely to attempt to control their spouses' drinking. Drinking and its control are associated with the emotional relationship between the spouses, and the attempts to control are logically associated with the controlled person's frequency of drinking. The wife's attempts to control the husband's drinking are more a blue collar than a white collar phenomenon. Finnish women and men drink more often than their Estonian counterparts. Maybe as a result of the greater frequency of drinking, drinking in Finland is more family-oriented than in Estonia. The Estonian culture seems more prone to informal control of the family members' drinking. These differences may be at least partly caused by differing alcohol policy climate in the two countries.
PubMed ID
2346790 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes and learning through practice are key to delivering brief interventions for heavy drinking in primary health care: Analyses from the ODHIN Five Country Cluster Randomized Factorial Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283531
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Jan 26;14(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-2017
Author
Peter Anderson
Eileen Kaner
Myrna Keurhorst
Preben Bendtsen
Ben van Steenkiste
Jillian Reynolds
Lidia Segura
Marcin Wojnar
Karolina Kloda
Kathryn Parkinson
Colin Drummond
Katarzyna Okulicz-Kozaryn
Artur Mierzecki
Miranda Laurant
Dorothy Newbury-Birch
Antoni Gual
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Jan 26;14(2)
Date
Jan-26-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control
Alcoholic Intoxication - prevention & control
Alcoholism - rehabilitation
Attitude of Health Personnel
England
Female
Health Personnel - education - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Poland
Primary Health Care - methods
Referral and Consultation
Spain
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
In this paper, we test path models that study the interrelations between primary health care provider attitudes towards working with drinkers, their screening and brief advice activity, and their receipt of training and support and financial reimbursement. Study participants were 756 primary health care providers from 120 primary health care units (PHCUs) in different locations throughout Catalonia, England, The Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Our interventions were training and support and financial reimbursement to providers. Our design was a randomized factorial trial with baseline measurement period, 12-week implementation period, and 9-month follow-up measurement period. Our outcome measures were: attitudes of individual providers in working with drinkers as measured by the Short Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire; and the proportion of consulting adult patients (age 18+ years) who screened positive and were given advice to reduce their alcohol consumption (intervention activity). We found that more positive attitudes were associated with higher intervention activity, and higher intervention activity was then associated with more positive attitudes. Training and support was associated with both positive changes in attitudes and higher intervention activity. Financial reimbursement was associated with more positive attitudes through its impact on higher intervention activity. We conclude that improving primary health care providers' screening and brief advice activity for heavy drinking requires a combination of training and support and on-the-job experience of actually delivering screening and brief advice activity.
Notes
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2014 Jan-Feb;49(1):66-7824232177
Cites: BMJ. 2013 Jan 09;346:e850123303891
Cites: BMJ Open. 2016 Aug 11;6(8):e01147327515753
Cites: Implement Sci. 2013 Jan 24;8:1123347874
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2004 Jul-Aug;39(4):351-615208170
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2003 Nov-Dec;38(6):597-60114633648
Cites: Br J Addict. 1986 Jun;81(3):405-183461849
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007 Apr 18;(2):CD00414817443541
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 Jul;50(4):430-725787012
Cites: Addict Sci Clin Pract. 2014 Aug 27;9:1425168288
Cites: Br J Addict. 1987 Jul;82(7):753-93478065
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2004 Aug;57(8):785-9415485730
Cites: Implement Sci. 2016 Jul 16;11:9627422283
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2014 Sep-Oct;49(5):531-925031247
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2006 Nov;63(9):2418-2816814441
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 1999 Sep;49(446):699-70310756610
Cites: Addiction. 2016 Nov;111(11):1935-194527237081
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1985 Jun 22;290(6485):1873-53924294
PubMed ID
28134783 View in PubMed
Less detail

Banning happy hours: the impact on drinking and impaired-driving charges in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237053
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1986 May;47(3):256-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Author
R G Smart
E M Adlaf
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1986 May;47(3):256-8
Date
May-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control
Alcoholic Intoxication - prevention & control
Humans
Ontario
Social Control, Formal
Abstract
The effect of happy hour discounts on alcohol consumption has become an important policy concern. Few studies, however, have examined this relationship. To examine the impact of banning happy hours in Ontario, an observational study of patron alcohol consumption was conducted in five taverns before and after the ban. Aggregate alcohol sales and impaired-driving charges were also collected. The results indicated no significant preban-postban differences in alcohol consumption among all individuals nor within taverns. Aggregate alcohol sales data also indicated no significant trends over a similar period. Although a significant decline for impaired-driving charges was suggested, it could not be causally attributed to the independent effect of the happy hour ban. Substantial price reductions may be required before increased alcohol consumption is discernable. Future research could focus on this issue.
PubMed ID
3724165 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can I have a beer, please? A study of alcohol service to young adults on licensed premises in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9322
Source
Prev Sci. 2004 Dec;5(4):221-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Eva Wallin
Sven Andreásson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Crafoords väg 6, 113 24 Stockholm, Sweden. eva.wallin@stad.org
Source
Prev Sci. 2004 Dec;5(4):221-9
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Alcoholic Intoxication - prevention & control
Commerce - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Male
Primary Prevention - standards
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Restaurants - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Responsibility
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This study evaluated the effects of a community alcohol prevention program on the frequency of alcohol service to young adults at licensed premises in Stockholm, Sweden. We used a pretest (1996)-posttests (1998 and 2001) design with intervention and control areas. The multicomponent intervention combines training of serving staff in responsible beverage service, policy initiatives, and enforcement of existing alcohol regulations. Adolescents 18 years old (the legal drinking age on licensed premises in Sweden), but younger looking according to an expert panel, visited licensed premises in pairs, where each adolescent ordered a beer. At baseline in 1996, the adolescents made 600 attempts to order. At follow-up in 1998, the number of attempts to order was 252, and at the second follow-up in 2001, the adolescents made 238 attempts. We found no statistically significant differences between the intervention and control areas. Overall, the frequency of alcohol service to adolescents on licensed premises in these areas of Stockholm decreased significantly over time, from 45 to 41 and to 32%, in 1996, 1998, and 2001, respectively. The decrease in alcohol service in 2001 was statistically significant compared to the baseline in 1996. One explanation for this improvement could be more effective enforcement of existing alcohol laws in both the intervention and control areas. We also found that licensed premises that used doormen to screen potential customers were less likely to sell to minors.
PubMed ID
15566048 View in PubMed
Less detail

32 records – page 1 of 4.