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Alcohol and cancer of the colon and rectum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11664
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1993 Sep;2(5):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
A. Romelsjö
M. Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Psychiatry, St. Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1993 Sep;2(5):401-8
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - pathology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The association between alcohol intake and colorectal cancer was examined in a population-based case-control study performed in Stockholm in 1986-88. The study included 352 cases of colon cancer, 217 cases of rectal cancer, and 512 controls. Relative risks, with 95% confidence intervals, were calculated for total alcohol intake and for different alcoholic beverages. Total alcohol intake (> or = 30 g 100% ethanol per day) was not associated with colon cancer (relative risk = 0.9, confidence intervals = 0.4-1.8) or rectal cancer (1.0, 0.4-2.1). There was no evidence supporting beverage specificity (for colorectal cancer and > or = 10 g 100% ethanol per day: beer 1.1, 0.6-2.0, wine 1.0, 0.4-2.7, spirits 1.0, 0.6-1.6). The associations did not vary according to gender or site within the large bowel. These analyses were adjusted for year of birth and gender (when appropriate). Further adjustments for diet, body mass or physical activity had little or no influence on the results. The present study does not support the hypothesis that alcohol plays an important role in the aetiology of cancer of the colon and rectum in a population with a relatively low alcohol intake.
PubMed ID
8401175 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and Russian mortality: a continuing crisis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149112
Source
Addiction. 2009 Oct;104(10):1630-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
David A Leon
Vladimir M Shkolnikov
Martin McKee
Author Affiliation
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK and Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
Source
Addiction. 2009 Oct;104(10):1630-6
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - mortality
Alcohol-Related Disorders - mortality
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Bias (epidemiology)
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Child
Data Collection - methods
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Humans
Infant
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Public Health
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Russia remains in the grip of a mortality crisis in which alcohol plays a central role. In 2007, male life expectancy at birth was 61 years, while for females it was 74 years. Alcohol is implicated particularly in deaths among working-age men.
To review the current state of knowledge about the contribution of alcohol to the continuing very high mortality seen among Russian adults
Conservative estimates attribute 31-43% of deaths among working-age men to alcohol. This latter estimate would imply a minimum of 170 000 excess deaths due to hazardous alcohol consumption in Russia per year. Men drink appreciably more than women in Russia. Hazardous drinking is most prevalent among people with low levels of education and those who are economically disadvantaged, partly because some of the available sources of ethanol are very cheap and easy to obtain. The best estimates available suggest that per capita consumption among adults is 15-18 litres of pure ethanol per year. However, reliable estimation of the total volume of alcohol consumed per capita in Russia is very difficult because of the diversity of sources of ethanol that are available, for many of which data do not exist. These include both illegal spirits, as well as legal non-beverage alcohols (such as medicinal tinctures). In 2006 regulations were introduced aimed at reducing the production and sale of non-beverage alcohols that are commonly drunk. These appear to have been only partially successful.
There is convincing evidence that alcohol plays an important role in explaining high mortality in Russia, in particular among working age men. However, there remain important uncertainties about the precise scale of the problem and about the health effects of the distinctive pattern of alcohol consumption that is prevalent in Russia today. While there is a need for further research, enough is known to justify the development of a comprehensive inter-sectoral alcohol control strategy. The recent fall in life expectancy in Russia should give a renewed urgency to attempts to move the policy agenda forward.
PubMed ID
19681805 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and liver cirrhosis mortality after lifting ban on beer sales in country with state alcohol monopoly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272377
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2015 Aug;25(4):729-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Thorarinn Tyrfingsson
Sigurdur Olafsson
Einar Stefan Bjornsson
Vilhjalmur Rafnsson
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2015 Aug;25(4):729-31
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
End Stage Liver Disease - mortality
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
The objectives were to study alcohol consumption per capita and liver cirrhosis mortality in the population of Iceland.
The Statistic Iceland website supplied alcohol sales figures and death rates.
The alcohol consumption increased 30% during the study period 1982-2009, because of increase in beer and wine, and decrease in spirits consumption. Chronic liver cirrhosis mortality increased significantly for men when comparing the 1982-88 rates (before beer ban was lifted) with the rates for 2003-09.
The findings do not support the suggestion that spirits consumption rather than the total alcohol consumption affect the cirrhosis mortality.
PubMed ID
25085471 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and major depression in the Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205218
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1998 Jun;43(5):502-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
S B Patten
D A Charney
Author Affiliation
Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, Calgary. patten@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1998 Jun;43(5):502-6
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Research Design
Risk factors
Abstract
Various clinical studies have documented associations between alcohol consumption and depressive disorders. In some circumstances, alcohol ingestion may cause or worsen depression, whereas in other circumstances the direction of causal effect may be reversed. The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between alcohol consumption and major depression in the Canadian population.
Data from the Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS) were analyzed. This survey, conducted by Statistics Canada in 1994, used a probability sample of 17,626 subjects. The NPHS included measures of alcohol ingestion and a diagnostic screen for major depression (Composite International Diagnostic Interview [CIDI] Short Form).
Subjects reporting any drinking in the year preceding the interview were more likely to have experienced an episode of major depression during that time than subjects reporting no drinking. Subjects reporting maximal ingestions of 5 or more drinks (and especially 10 or more drinks) on at least 1 occasion during the preceding year were also at greater risk of major depression than nondrinking subjects or subjects reporting smaller maximal ingestions. Neither the average amount consumed daily nor the frequency of drinking was associated with major depression.
In the general population, there is no simple relationship between the quantity or frequency of alcohol consumption and the prevalence of major depression. Any drinking and maximal consumption on 1 occasion, however, are related to the prevalence of major depression. Further research is needed to delineate causal mechanisms so that clinical and public-health interventions can be formulated.
PubMed ID
9653535 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption level in Russia: a viewpoint on monitoring health conditions in the Russian Federation (RLMS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186525
Source
Addiction. 2003 Mar;98(3):369-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
A. Nemtsov
Source
Addiction. 2003 Mar;98(3):369-70
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Notes
Comment In: Addiction. 2004 Mar;99(3):386-714982552
PubMed ID
12603237 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related harm and alcohol consumption in Moscow before, during and after a major anti-alcohol campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203253
Source
Addiction. 1998 Oct;93(10):1501-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
A V Nemtsov
Author Affiliation
Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry, Russia. niip@glasnet.ru
Source
Addiction. 1998 Oct;93(10):1501-10
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Death, Sudden - epidemiology
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - epidemiology - etiology
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Moscow - epidemiology
Violence
Abstract
To examine the rates of alcohol-related harm in relation to levels of alcohol consumption before, during and after a major anti-alcohol campaign in Moscow.
Changes in State alcohol sale and alcohol consumption and certain forms of alcohol-related harm were observed as a function of time.
Following the 1985 anti-alcohol campaign, State alcohol sales decreased by 38.0% in 1.5 years in Moscow, and total consumption decreased by 28.6%. At the same time, admissions for alcohol-related mental and behavioural disorders, deaths from liver cirrhosis, alcohol poisoning and other blood alcohol positive violent deaths decreased by 63.3%, 33.0%, 50.8% and 50.9%, respectively. There was a linear correlation between medical variables and alcohol consumption during its decrease in 1985-86. An increase in blood alcohol positive violent deaths began in 1987, before the increases in other variables. Growth of total alcohol consumption began in 1987, and continued during all subsequent years, although it was especially high in 1992-93 at the time of the introduction of market reforms in Russia. Alcohol-related mental and behavioural disorders and liver cirrhosis mortality increased after a time-lag following the rise in alcohol consumption.
The findings provide stark evidence of the potential impact of policy measures applied to general alcohol consumption on alcohol-related harm.
PubMed ID
9926554 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol sales and mortality due to pulmonary tuberculosis: relationships at a populational level].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177551
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2004;(9):53-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004

Beverage-specific alcohol sales and violent mortality in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138655
Source
Adicciones. 2010;22(4):311-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Yury Evgeny Razvodovsky
Author Affiliation
Grodno State Medical University, Belarus. razvodovsky@tut.by
Source
Adicciones. 2010;22(4):311-5
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Commerce - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mortality - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
High violent mortality rate in Russia and its profound fluctuation over recent decades have attracted considerable interest. A mounting body of evidence points to the binge drinking pattern as a potentially important contributor to the violent mortality crisis in Russia. In line with this evidence, we assume that higher level of vodka consumption in conjunction with binge drinking pattern results in close aggregate-level association between vodka sales and violent mortality rates in Russia.
To test this hypothesis, trends in beverage-specific alcohol sales per capita and mortality rates from external causes in Russia between 1980 and 2005 were analyzed by means of ARIMA time-series analysis.
Results of the analysis indicate that violent mortality rates tend to be more responsive to change in vodka sales per capita than to change in total level of alcohol sales. The analysis suggests that a 1-litre increase in vodka sales per capita would result in a 5% increase in violent mortality rate, an 11.3% increase in accidents and injuries mortality rate, a 9.2% increase in suicide rate, a 12.5% increase in homicide rate, and a 21.9% increase in fatal alcohol poisoning rate.
The outcomes of this study provide support for the hypothesis that alcohol played a crucial role in the fluctuation in violent mortality rate in Russia in recent decades. Assuming that drinking vodka is usually associated with intoxication episodes, these findings provide additional evidence that the binge drinking pattern is an important determinant of the violent mortality crisis in Russia.
PubMed ID
21152849 View in PubMed
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Bias in estimates of alcohol use among older people: selection effects due to design, health, and cohort replacement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270977
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:769
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Susanne Kelfve
Kozma Ahacic
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:769
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
There is a growing awareness of the need to include the oldest age groups in the epidemiological monitoring of alcohol consumption. This poses a number of challenges and this study sets out to examine the possible selection effects due to survey design, health status, and cohort replacement on estimates of alcohol use among the oldest old.
Analyses were based on three repeated cross-sectional interview surveys from 1992, 2002 and 2011, with relatively high response rates (86 %). The samples were nationally representative of the Swedish population aged 77+ (total n?=?2022). Current alcohol use was assessed by the question "How often do you drink alcoholic beverages, such as wine, beer or spirits?" Alcohol use was examined in relation to survey design (response rate, use of proxy interviews and telephone interviews), health (institutional living, limitations with Activities of Daily Living and mobility problems) and birth cohort (in relation to age and period). Two outcomes were studied using binary and ordered logistic regression; use of alcohol and frequency of use among alcohol users.
Higher estimates of alcohol use, as well as more frequent use, were associated with lower response rates, not using proxy interviews and exclusion of institutionalized respondents. When adjusted for health, none of these factors related to the survey design were significant. Moreover, the increase in alcohol use during the period was fully explained by cohort replacement. This cohort effect was also at least partially confounded by survey design and health effects. Results were similar for both outcomes.
Survey non-participation in old age is likely to be associated with poor health and low alcohol consumption. Failure to include institutionalized respondents or those who are difficult to recruit is likely to lead to an overestimation of alcohol consumption, whereas basing prevalence on older data, at least in Sweden, is likely to underestimate the alcohol use of the oldest old. Trends in alcohol consumption in old age are highly sensitive for cohort effects. When analysing age-period-cohort effects, it is important to be aware of these health and design issues as they may lead to incorrect conclusions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26260667 View in PubMed
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Changes in suicide rates after reductions in alcohol consumption and problems in Ontario, 1975-1983.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229315
Source
Br J Addict. 1990 Apr;85(4):463-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
R G Smart
R E Mann
Author Affiliation
Addiction Research Foundation, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Br J Addict. 1990 Apr;85(4):463-8
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethanol - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In this paper the relationships among suicide rates in Ontario for males, females and the total population, alcohol consumption, and other alcohol-related problems are examined for the period 1963-1983. Suicide rates, like other alcohol-related problems, were strongly correlated with per capita consumption over the total period. However, during the recent period of stabilization in consumption (1975-83), the correlations were markedly reduced and substantial differences in trends for males and females were observed. The contribution to these diverging trends of such factors as increased treatment of alcohol abuse, rising unemployment, and reduced use of tranquilizing drugs is discussed.
PubMed ID
2346786 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.