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334 records – page 1 of 34.

The 16% solution and other mysteries concerning the accuracy of alcohol consumption estimates based on sales data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247149
Source
Br J Addict Alcohol Other Drugs. 1979 Jun;74(2):165-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1979
Author
E. Single
N. Giesbrecht
Source
Br J Addict Alcohol Other Drugs. 1979 Jun;74(2):165-73
Date
Jun-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Beverages
Commerce
Drug Utilization
Humans
Ontario
Records as Topic
Wine
PubMed ID
287509 View in PubMed
Less detail

60- and 72-month follow-up of children prenatally exposed to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol: cognitive and language assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222648
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
P A Fried
C M O'Connell
B. Watkinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Aptitude
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Synergism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence
Intelligence Tests
Language Development Disorders - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marijuana Smoking - adverse effects
Ontario
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Environment
Abstract
Cognitive and receptive language development were examined in 135 60-month-old and 137 72-month-old children for whom prenatal exposure to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol had been ascertained. Discriminant Function analysis revealed an association between prenatal cigarette exposure and lower cognitive and receptive language scores at 60 and 72 months. This paralleled and extended observations made with this sample at annual assessments at 12 to 48 months of age. Unlike observations made at 48 months, prenatal exposure to marijuana was not associated with the cognitive and verbal outcomes. Relatively low levels of maternal alcohol consumption did not have significant relationships with the outcome variables. The importance of assessing subtle components rather than global cognitive and language skills to detect potential behavioral teratogenic effects of the drugs being examined is discussed.
Notes
Comment In: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):425-81469111
PubMed ID
1469105 View in PubMed
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The 1978 strike at the Norwegian Wine and Spirits Monopoly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12888
Source
Br J Addict. 1983 Mar;78(1):51-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1983

The abolition of the Swedish alcohol rationing system: effects on consumption distribution and cirrhosis mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12586
Source
Br J Addict. 1987 Jun;82(6):633-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987

The actual and the registered frequency of drunkenness in Helsinki.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110099
Source
Br J Addict Alcohol Other Drugs. 1969 May;64(1):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1969
Author
K. Bruun
Source
Br J Addict Alcohol Other Drugs. 1969 May;64(1):3-8
Date
May-1969
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Beverages
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Finland
Humans
Male
Social Problems
PubMed ID
5253629 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute cholestatic liver injury caused by polyhexamethyleneguanidine hydrochloride admixed to ethyl alcohol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132938
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2011 Jul;49(6):471-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Y N Ostapenko
K M Brusin
Y V Zobnin
A Y Shchupak
M K Vishnevetskiy
V G Sentsov
O V Novikova
S A Alekseenko
O A Lebed'ko
Y B Puchkov
Author Affiliation
Research and Applied Toxicology Center of the Federal Medical-Biological Agency, Moscow, Russia. rtiac2003@yahoo.com
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2011 Jul;49(6):471-7
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcoholic Beverages - poisoning
Central Nervous System Depressants - poisoning
Cholestasis - pathology - ultrasonography
Clinical Laboratory Techniques
Disinfectants - poisoning
Drug-Induced Liver Injury - pathology - ultrasonography
Epidemics
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Guanidines - poisoning
Hepatic Encephalopathy - chemically induced - psychology
Humans
Liver - pathology
Liver Function Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Poisoning - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
Polyhexamethyleneguanidine hydrochloride (PHMG) is an antimicrobial biocide of the guanidine family. In the period from August 2006 to May 2007, more than 12500 patients were admitted to hospital with a history of drinking illegal cheap "vodka" in 44 different regions in Russia, of whom 9.4% died. In reality, the "vodka" was an antiseptic liquid composed of ethanol (˜93%), diethyl phthalate, and 0.1-0.14% PHMG (brand name "Extrasept-1").
We performed an analysis of the clinical features and outcome in four poisoning treatment centers in the cities of Perm, Ekaterinburg, Irkutsk, and Khabarovsk. A total of 579 patients (215 females and 364 males) with similar symptoms were included.
The main symptoms on admission included jaundice (99.7%), skin itch (78.4%), weakness (96%), anorexia (65.8%), dizziness (65.3%), nausea (54.8%), vomiting (22.6%), stomach ache (52.7%), diarrhea (32%), and fever (50%). Mild symptoms were found in 2.5% of cases, moderate in 63%, and severe in 34.5%. Laboratory results were (mean ± SD): total bilirubin 249 ± 158 µmol/L, direct bilirubin 166 ± 97 µmol/L, cholesterol 14 ± 8 mmol/L, alanine aminotransferase 207 ± 174 IU/L, aspartate aminotransferase 174 ± 230 IU/L, alkaline phosphatase 742 ± 751 IU/L, and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase 1199 ± 1095 IU/L. Patients generally recovered over a period of 1-5 months, although high levels of alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase were still found in all patients examined after 6 months. Sixty-one patients (10.5%) died between 23 and 150 days after poisoning. Local cholestasis, inflammatory infiltration, and fibrosis developing into cirrhosis were found by liver biopsy.
Acute liver injury caused by PHMG-hydrochloride or PHMG in combination with either ethanol or diethyl phthalate can be characterized as cholestatic hepatitis with a severe inflammatory component causing high mortality.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2011 Jul;49(6):441-221824054
Comment In: Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2012 Feb;50(2):154-5; author reply 15622216917
PubMed ID
21761961 View in PubMed
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Acute poisonings in Iceland: a prospective nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86765
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Feb;46(2):126-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Kristinsson Jakob
Palsson Runolfur
Gudjonsdottir Gudborg A
Blondal Margret
Gudmundsson Sigurdur
Snook Curtis P
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pharmacy, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Feb;46(2):126-32
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholic Beverages - poisoning
Child
Child, Preschool
Circadian Rhythm
Counseling - methods
Data Collection - methods - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hazardous Substances - classification - poisoning
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Poison Control Centers - utilization
Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Rural Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Poisoning is a common cause of emergency visits and hospital admission in Western countries. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and type of toxic exposures presenting to emergency medical facilities in Iceland. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was prospective and included all patients with confirmed or suspected poisoning presenting to hospitals and rural medical centers providing emergency services in Iceland during the twelve-month period from April 2001 until March 2002. RESULTS: A total of 1,121 toxic exposures were documented representing an incidence of 3.91 cases per 1,000 inhabitants per year. The female to male ratio was 1.23. The majority of exposures (56.7%) occurred in the patient's home, 60% were deliberate, 72% had drugs and/or alcohol as their main cause, and 11% involved illicit drugs. Exposures to chemicals other than drugs were usually unintentional. CONCLUSION: Toxic exposures requiring emergency medical care are common in Iceland. Self-poisonings by ingestion of prescription drugs and/or alcohol accounted for the majority of cases.
PubMed ID
18259960 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Oct;96(10):626-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Kristín Magnúsdóttir
Jakop Kristinsson
Borkell Jóhannesson
Author Affiliation
kristmag@hi.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Oct;96(10):626-8
Date
Oct-2010
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - analysis
Ethylene Glycol - analysis
Food Contamination - legislation & jurisprudence
Food Labeling
Food Preservatives - analysis
Fraud
Humans
Iceland
Methanol - analysis
Sweetening Agents - analysis
Abstract
Adulterated alcoholic beverages are legal alcoholic products that have been illicitly tampered with, for instance, by criminally diluting them with water, purposely putting them into new containers to conceal their true origin or adding toxic substances to manipulate the qualities of alcoholic beverages. The collection of cases at the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Iceland, which contains examples of each category of adulteration, is the basis of the present article. Especially noteworthy are cases involving the toxic substances methanol and/or ethylene glycol. Methanol has been added to legally produced wines to increase their "bite" and ethylene glycol to increase their sweetness. Adding these substances to wine has resulted in poisoning or death in other countries, but not in Iceland as far as is known.
PubMed ID
20959682 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advertising and alcohol sales: a legal impact study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225489
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1991 Nov;52(6):555-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
C R Makowsky
P C Whitehead
Author Affiliation
Health Services and Promotion Branch, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1991 Nov;52(6):555-67
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - supply & distribution
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Public Policy
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
According to the single distribution theory increases in the availability of alcoholic beverages in the general population are associated with increases in average consumption and increases in alcohol-related damage. If it can be demonstrated that advertising contributes to availability, perhaps in the form of what has been called social or subjective availability, then advertising could be considered an appropriate target of prevention. A 58-year ban on advertising of alcoholic beverages was lifted in Saskatchewan in 1983. Data on monthly sales of beer, wine and distilled spirits were examined for the years 1981 to 1987. Box-Jenkins time series techniques were used to estimate the statistical relationship between the policy change and volume of sales of alcoholic beverages. The results revealed that sales of beer increased and sales of spirits decreased following the change in legislation that permitted alcohol advertising in Saskatchewan. The main finding is that there was no impact on wine and total alcohol sales from the introduction of alcohol advertising. Alcohol advertising may have produced a substitution effect with respect to beer and spirits, but this was not predicted. This evaluation suggests that alcohol advertising is not a contributory force that influences the overall level of alcohol consumption. The place of advertising in the single distribution theory remains not proven, and the place of advertising as an instrument of public policy with respect to the prevention of alcohol-related damage remains in question.
PubMed ID
1758183 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age, period and cohort effects on time trends in alcohol consumption in the Swedish adult population 1979-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269107
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 May;50(3):319-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Ludwig Kraus
Mimmi Eriksson Tinghög
Annette Lindell
Alexander Pabst
Daniela Piontek
Robin Room
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 May;50(3):319-27
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Effect
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
In Sweden, alcohol abstention has increased over the last 20 years and consumption has recently decreased after a peak in 2004. To understand the dynamics of these trends the present study aims at estimating age, period and cohort (APC) effects on trends in alcohol use prevalence as well as overall and beverage-specific volume of drinking over the last three decades.
APC analysis of seven cross-sectional surveys from 1979 to 2011 was conducted using cross-classified random effects models (CCREMs) by gender. The nationally representative samples comprised 77,598 respondents aged 16-80 years. Outcome measures were 30-day prevalence of alcohol use and overall as well as beverage-specific alcohol volume.
Trends in prevalence, overall and beverage-specific volume were significantly affected by APC. The period effects of prevalence and overall volume show a small decline after an increase up to the year 2005. Mean beer and wine volume levelled off after a peak in 2005 and volume of spirits drinking decreased constantly. Predicted alcohol prevalence rates in male cohorts (1945-1985) remained generally at the same level, while they declined in post-World War II female generations. Results point to high overall and beverage-specific consumption among cohorts born in the 1940s, 1950s and 1980s.
High consuming cohorts of the 1940-1950s were key in rising consumption up to 2005. Progression through the life course of these cohorts, a decrease in prevalence and drinking volume in successive cohorts seem to have contributed to the recent downward trend in alcohol use in Sweden.
PubMed ID
25743087 View in PubMed
Less detail

334 records – page 1 of 34.