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[Alternative food fortification during Christmas time].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117566
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Dec 3;174(49):3089-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-3-2012
Author
Michael Patrick Achiam
Jakob Burcharth
Hans-Christian Pommergaard
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk Afdeling, Køge Sygehus, Lykkebækvej 1, 4600 Køge, Denmark. achiam@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Dec 3;174(49):3089-91
Date
Dec-3-2012
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - analysis
Denmark
Food, Fortified
Holidays
Humans
Meat products
Proton Pump Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Solanum tuberosum
Vitamin B Complex - administration & dosage
Abstract
Alcohol consumption is known to increase during Christmas time and excessive alcohol consumption has been proven to be associated with gastrointestinal bleeding and certain vitamin deficiencies. While food fortification is well known and practiced in most countries, food or beverages fortified with medicine has never been practiced on a wider scale, just as alcohol rarely is fortified. In this article it is speculated how alcohol fortified with proton pump inhibitor and vitamin B would effect alcohol-related morbidity.
PubMed ID
23286727 View in PubMed
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The basis for Canada's new low-risk drinking guidelines: a relative risk approach to estimating hazardous levels and patterns of alcohol use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130930
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2012 Mar;31(2):126-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Tim Stockwell
Peter Butt
Doug Beirness
Louis Gliksman
Catherine Paradis
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada. timstock@uvic.ca
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2012 Mar;31(2):126-34
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Canada
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Harm Reduction
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Risk
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
Low-risk drinking guidelines have been developed independently in a number of jurisdictions resulting in different sets of advice with different definitions of 'low risk'. This paper discusses some of the fundamental issues addressed by an expert advisory panel during the course of developing national guidelines for Canadians and summarises key sets of evidence that were influential.
The underlying reasoning and connection between the evidence and the guidelines is discussed in relation to: (i) how to minimise risk of long-term illnesses; (ii) how to minimise risk of short-term harms, for example injury; and (iii) alcohol use during pregnancy. Both absolute and relative risks were considered in the development of the guidelines.
Meta-analyses of all-cause mortality were used to identify upper limits for usual drinking levels where potential benefits and risks were balanced for the average person in comparison with lifetime abstainers (10 standard drinks per week for women, 15 for men). Emergency room studies and situational risk factors were considered for advice on reducing short-term: (i) when not to drink at all; (ii) how to reduce intoxication; and (iii) upper limits for occasional daily consumption by adults aged 25 to 64 years (3 standard drinks for women, 4 for men). Shortcomings in the research data were highlighted.
It was estimated that total compliance with these guidelines at a national level would result in substantially reduced per capita alcohol consumption and approximately 4600 fewer deaths per year.
Notes
Comment In: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2012 Mar;31(2):153-522220756
PubMed ID
21954872 View in PubMed
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Costs for screening, intervention and hospital treatment generated by the Malmö Preventive Project: a large-scale community screening programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10041
Source
J Intern Med. 2002 Jan;251(1):44-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
A. Norinder
U. Persson
P. Nilsson
J-A Nilsson
B. Hedblad
G. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Health Economics (IHE), Lund, Sweden. an@ihe.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2002 Jan;251(1):44-52
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Alcoholism - diagnosis
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis
Female
Health Care Costs
Hospital Costs
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - diagnosis
Hypertension - diagnosis
Male
Mass Screening - economics
Middle Aged
Preventive Health Services - economics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to estimate retrospectively the costs of health care resources used in the Malmö Preventive Project, Sweden and estimate the costs of in-patient care that were avoided because of early intervention. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: A large-scale community intervention programme was conducted from 1974 to 1992 in Malmö, Sweden with the aim of reducing morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), alcohol related illnesses, and breast cancer. Between 1974 and 1992, 33 336 male and female subjects were screened for hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, type-2 diabetes and alcohol abuse. Intervention programmes that included life-style modifications, follow-up visits with physicians and nurses and drug therapy were offered to about 25% of screened subjects. METHODS: Recruitment costs were generated through out the screening period. Intervention costs were estimated for 5 years after screening. Excess in-patient care costs were estimated by subtracting hospital consumption for an unscreened, matched cohort from that of the screened cohort over follow-up periods of 13-19 years. Intervention and excess in-patient care costs were estimated until 1996. RESULTS: The net expenditures for recruitment and intervention was SEK253 million and saved costs for in-patient care of SEK143 millions (1998 prices). Considering the opportunity cost of the resources used in the study, the net cost rises to about SEK200 millions. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that only part of the intervention costs were offset by reduction in future morbidity health care costs. This is in line with results from prospective analyses of other primary prevention programmes.
PubMed ID
11851864 View in PubMed
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Effects on Alcohol Consumption and Alcohol Related Harm of a Community-Based Prevention Intervention With National Support in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295914
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2018 02 23; 53(3):412-419
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-23-2018
Author
Tony Nilsson
Peter Allebeck
Håkan Leifman
Sven Andréasson
Thor Norström
Karin Guldbrandsson
Author Affiliation
a Division of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences , Karolinska Institutet , Sweden.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2018 02 23; 53(3):412-419
Date
02-23-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control
Alcohol-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Community Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Financial Support
Harm Reduction
Humans
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
In order to strengthen local alcohol prevention work in Sweden the Swedish government has for the past almost 15 years commissioned the Public Health Agency of Sweden to initiate a series of community-based alcohol prevention projects. The latest of these, labeled local development with ambitions (LUMA), included 25 municipalities in Sweden.
Aim of this study is to examine if LUMA municipalities that received financial support, with requirements, increased local alcohol prevention and if alcohol consumption and harm declined.
Twenty-five Swedish municipalities that received financial support aiming to strengthen local alcohol preventing activities (intervention group) were compared to municipalities that did not receive such support (control group, N = 224), before, during, and after the intervention period. Two composite measures of policy and activity were created and used. The composite activity measure includes seven activity indicators and the composite policy measure includes six policy indicators. Harm measures have been selected based on several recommended indicators for monitoring alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs in Sweden. A fixed effects model was used to analyze data.
The results reveal that prevention activities increased and several alcohol-related harm indicators were reduced in intervention municipalities (LUMA) compared with in control municipalities.
It seems as if financial support, combined with specific requirements and support from the regional and national level, can stimulate local alcohol prevention activities and have a significant effect on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm. Similar evaluations in other countries would be of great value for assessing the generalizability of findings.
PubMed ID
28816572 View in PubMed
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Harm minimization among teenage drinkers: findings from an ethnographic study on teenage alcohol use in a rural Danish community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78463
Source
Addiction. 2007 Apr;102(4):554-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Jørgensen Morten Hulvej
Curtis Tine
Christensen Pia Haudrup
Grønbaek Morten
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Øster Farimagsgade 5A,2, DK-1399 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Addiction. 2007 Apr;102(4):554-9
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control - psychology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Awareness
Denmark
Female
Harm Reduction
Health education
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Rural Health
Social Environment
Abstract
AIM: To examine strategies of harm minimization employed by teenage drinkers. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Two periods of ethnographic fieldwork were conducted in a rural Danish community of approximately 2000 inhabitants. The fieldwork included 50 days of participant observation among 13-16-year-olds (n = 93) as well as 26 semistructured interviews with small self-selected friendship groups of 15-16-year-olds (n = 32). FINDINGS: The teenagers participating in the present study were more concerned about social than health risks. The informants monitored their own level of intoxication, but in order to reduce alcohol consumption they depended upon support from their peers. The informants preferred drinking in the company of well-known and trusted peers, and during drinking episodes they supervised and intervened in each others' drinking to the extent that they deemed it necessary and possible. In regulating the social context of drinking they relied on their personal experiences more than on formalized knowledge about alcohol and harm, which they had learned from prevention campaigns and educational programmes. CONCLUSIONS: In this study we found that teenagers may help each other to minimize alcohol-related harm, and teenage peer groups should thus be considered a resource for health promotion.
Notes
Comment In: Addiction. 2007 Apr;102(4):512-317362285
PubMed ID
17362292 View in PubMed
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[Impact of a 10-year nation-wide campaign on knowledge of sensible drinking limits in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9831
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Dec 2;164(49):5782-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-2002
Author
Morten N Grønbaek
Ulla Strøger
Henrik Strunge
Lars Møller
Vibeke Graff
Lars Iversen
Author Affiliation
Center for Alkoholforskning, Statens Institut for Folkesundhed, Svanemollevej 25, DK-2100 København ø.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Dec 2;164(49):5782-6
Date
Dec-2-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - psychology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Public Health Practice
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: In Great Britain and in Denmark, strong efforts have been made to influence knowledge on the upper threshold of hazardous drinking. In Denmark, a campaign has been repeated every week 40 from 1990 to 2001 with information on the sensible drinking limits of 21 drinks per week for men and 14 drinks per week for women. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of this ongoing campaign on the level of knowledge of sensible drinking limits for men and women. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Every year from 1994 to 1999, random representative samples of 1,030 adult Danes were interviewed on the telephone. RESULTS: Our main finding was that the level of knowledge of sensible drinking limits for own sex increased in all subsets of the population throughout the period. However, at the end of the study period (1999), a total of 80% of highly educated young (18-25 years of age) men knew sensible drinking limits for own sex, while only 35% of uneducated older (more than 65 years old) men had knowledge on sensible drinking limits. The proportions were similar among women: Subjects admitting an intake higher than sensible for own sex, i.e. 21 and 14 drinks per week, respectively, had the highest knowledge of these drinking limits. DISCUSSION: We conclude that public health campaigns, such as the sensible drinking limit campaign, certainly has an impact on the level of awareness in the general population. Furthermore, those drinking more than 21 and 14 drinks per week, respectively, are reached by these campaigns.
PubMed ID
12523219 View in PubMed
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[Insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of brief alcohol interventions in health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288367
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Sep 08;176(37)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-08-2014
Author
Anders Blædel Gottlieb Hansen
Anette Søgaard Nielsen
Ulrik Becker
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Sep 08;176(37)
Date
Sep-08-2014
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Counseling
Denmark
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Psychotherapy, Brief
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Very brief alcohol interventions (approx. 5 min.) are recommended for implementation in Danish municipalities by the The Danish Health and Medicines Authority. We have investigated the evidence supporting this recommendation. A lack of clarity remains about the active components in brief interventions and the extent to which the existing evidence base can be interpreted as efficacy or effectiveness studies. This has important implications for the generalizability of the trials. There is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of very brief alcohol interventions and implementation is premature.
PubMed ID
25294036 View in PubMed
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Interventions by students in friends' alcohol, tobacco, and drug use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209892
Source
J Drug Educ. 1997;27(3):213-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
R G Smart
G. Stoduto
Author Affiliation
Addiction Research Foundation, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Drug Educ. 1997;27(3):213-22
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - psychology
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control - psychology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Child
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Ontario
Smoking - prevention & control - psychology
Street Drugs
Students - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
This article investigates self-reported interventions by students in the alcohol, tobacco, illicit drug use, and drinking-driving of their friends. The data came from a study of 1184 students in Ontario schools in grades 7, 9, 11, and 13. We found that about a third of students intervened in friends' illegal drug use and drinking-driving but about half intervened about smoking. Students who intervened were more likely to be older and spend fewer nights at home. They were less likely to use cannabis, but had more friends using cannabis and illegal drugs. Also, they had more exposure to drug education and were more disapproving of drug use. Drug education may give students the knowledge and confidence to intervene in friends' drug use.
PubMed ID
9366127 View in PubMed
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Preventing alcohol problems and improving drinking habits among employees: An evaluation of alcohol education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278357
Source
Work. 2015;53(2):421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Mimmi Eriksson Tinghög
Petter Tinghög
Source
Work. 2015;53(2):421-8
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Female
Habits
Health education
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In a municipality in Sweden there was a concern about the high alcohol consumption among its residents. An alcohol education program was provided to all those employed by the municipality.
To investigate whether a day-long alcohol education program provided to all employed by a Swedish municipality had an effect on alcohol consumption among employees and specifically among employees with low and higher levels of consumption respectively.
A quasi-experimental evaluation using pre-test and post-test questionnaires was performed. The municipality's employees were divided in one intervention group (n: 124) and one control group (n: 139). ANOVA with repeated measures was performed on AUDIT-score and on three separate AUDIT-items: frequency of drinking, frequency of binge drinking, and typical amount consumed per drinking occasion.
No significant effect on alcohol consumption was identified for the intervention group as a whole. Stratified analyses showed the intervention had a significant effect on reducing the frequency of binge drinking among those with the highest consumption.
Compared to many other studies on alcohol education, some results on behaviour were found when performing stratified analyses. The employees with the highest alcohol consumption, although not labelled high consumers, reduced the frequency of binge drinking. It is difficult to speculate whether these results can be generalized to other working populations. The results have to be compared with more direct methods of reaching risk consumers, such as screening and brief interventions. Knowledge about alcohol and the associated risks of alcohol consumption might facilitate the willingness to seek help sooner.
PubMed ID
26835859 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.