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15-year-old tobacco and alcohol abstainers in a drier generation: Characteristics and lifestyle factors in a Norwegian cross-sectional sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300210
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Jun; 47(4):439-445
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2019
Author
Ingeborg Lund
Janne Scheffels
Author Affiliation
Department of Alcohol, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Tobacco and Drugs, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Jun; 47(4):439-445
Date
Jun-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tobacco Use - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Norwegian adolescents currently drink and smoke less on average than previous cohorts. Based on cross-sectional survey data, the individual and familial characteristics of 15-year-old non-users and users of alcohol and tobacco were compared to identify correlates to abstinence.
The survey was approved by the Norwegian Social Science Service. The sample consisted of 3107 adolescents from a 2011 school-based survey, of which 848 (27.3%) did not drink alcohol nor use tobacco. Associations with leisure time activities, risk perceptions, parenting style and social factors were analysed by logistic regression.
Most of the non-drinkers were also non-users of tobacco. Abstainers (neither alcohol nor tobacco use) tended to have less unorganized and more hobby-related leisure time activities, higher risk perceptions for smoking, and monitoring or emotionally supportive parents. They more rarely reported close relationships with their best friend and were more likely to report lower occurrences of drinking and smoking among friends or siblings.
Differences in perceived parenting styles and a lower degree of unorganized leisure in the abstainer group points to monitoring and closer emotional ties between parents and children as important factors in adolescent abstinence. An implication of these results is that promoting hobby-based activities might be a useful strategy for preventing alcohol and tobacco use in young people.
PubMed ID
29671371 View in PubMed
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A 24-year follow-up of body mass index and cerebral atrophy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9325
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2004
Author
D. Gustafson
L. Lissner
C. Bengtsson
C. Björkelund
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA. deb.gustafson@neuro.gu.se
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Date
Nov-23-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Atrophy
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cerebral Cortex - pathology - radiography
Comorbidity
Dementia - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the longitudinal relationship between body mass index (BMI), a major vascular risk factor, and cerebral atrophy, a marker of neurodegeneration, in a population-based sample of middle-aged women. METHODS: A representative sample of 290 women born in 1908, 1914, 1918, and 1922 was examined in 1968 to 1969, 1974 to 1975, 1980 to 1981, and 1992 to 1993 as part of the Population Study of Women in Göteborg, Sweden. At each examination, women completed a survey on a variety of health and lifestyle factors and underwent anthropometric, clinical, and neuropsychiatric assessments and blood collection. Atrophy of the temporal, frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes was measured on CT in 1992 when participants were age 70 to 84. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between BMI and brain measures. RESULTS: Women with atrophy of the temporal lobe were, on average, 1.1 to 1.5 kg/m2 higher in BMI at all examinations than women without temporal atrophy (p
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2005 Jun 14;64(11):1990-1; author reply 1990-115955971
SummaryForPatientsIn: Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):E19-2015557485
PubMed ID
15557505 View in PubMed
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A 26-year follow-up study of heavy drinking trajectories from adolescence to mid-adulthood and adult disadvantage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115198
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2013 Jul-Aug;48(4):452-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Noora Berg
Olli Kiviruusu
Sakari Karvonen
Laura Kestilä
Tomi Lintonen
Ossi Rahkonen
Taina Huurre
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland. noora.berg@thl.fi
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2013 Jul-Aug;48(4):452-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Sex Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Unemployment
Abstract
The aim of the study was to identify heavy drinking trajectories from age 16 to 42 years and to examine their associations with health, social, employment and economic disadvantage in mid-adulthood.
Finnish cohort study's participants who were 16 years old in 1983 were followed up at age 22, 32 and 42 (n = 1334). Heavy drinking was assessed at every study phase and based on these measurements trajectories of heavy drinking were identified. The trajectory groups were then examined as predictors of disadvantage at age 42.
Five distinct heavy drinking trajectories were identified: moderate (35%), steady low (22%), decreasing (9%), increasing (11%) and steady high (23%). Frequencies of the trajectory groups differed by gender. Using the moderate trajectory as a reference category, women in the steady high trajectory had an increased risk of experiencing almost all disadvantages at age 42. In men, increasing and steady high groups had an increased risk for experiencing health and economic disadvantage.
Steady high female drinkers and steady high and increasing male drinkers had the highest risk for disadvantage in mid-adulthood. By identifying heavy drinking trajectories from adolescence to mid-adulthood we can better predict long-term consequences of heavy alcohol use and plan prevention and intervention programmes.
PubMed ID
23531717 View in PubMed
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The 1993 General Social Survey I: alcohol use in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213881
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Nov-Dec;86(6):397-401
Publication Type
Article
Author
E W Single
J M Brewster
P. MacNeil
J. Hatcher
C. Trainor
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Nov-Dec;86(6):397-401
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Religion
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Rates and correlates of alcohol use are reported from the 1993 General Social Survey, a household telephone survey of 10,385 Canadians carried out by Statistics Canada. Continuing a recent trend, alcohol use has declined. The portrait of the Canadian who is most likely to drink and drink heavily is that of a young adult male who is not married, relatively well-off, and rarely or never attends religious services. In a multivariate analysis of the combined impact of sociodemographic factors on drinking and drinking levels, it was found that the frequency of religious attendance and age were the strongest predictors of current drinking. Gender was the strongest predictor of volume of alcohol consumption, while religious attendance, age, marital status and employment status were also significant predictors.
PubMed ID
8932479 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Jan 8;133(1):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-8-2013
Author
Willy Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Institutt for sosiologi og samfunnsgeografi Universitetet i Oslo, Norway. willy.pedersen@sosgeo.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Jan 8;133(1):33-6
Date
Jan-8-2013
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety - epidemiology
Coitus
Depression - epidemiology
Humans
Loneliness
Norway
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Social Support
Temperance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Abstinence from alcohol has been associated with higher mortality than a moderate consumption of alcohol. However, there is evidence to indicate that the abstainers constitute a select group which is exposed to various psychosocial risk factors.
A population-based sample (N=1978) from the study Young in Norway - longitudinal was followed with repeated surveys from their teens until approaching the age of 30. This data set was linked to various registries. The collection of data included their use of alcohol, social integration and symptoms of anxiety and depression, as well as sexual behaviour. Data on receipt of social benefits were collected from registries.
At age 21, altogether 211 individuals (10.7%) had remained abstinent from alcohol throughout their entire lives. At age 28, their number had fallen to 93 individuals (4.7%). At age 21, abstinence was associated with weak networks of friends, loneliness and a higher likelihood of not yet having had a sexual debut. At age 28, the abstainers also reported a higher prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression. They were also more frequent recipients of social benefits.
Abstinence from alcohol in adulthood is associated with psychosocial problems and weak integration. These may introduce confounding factors in studies of the health effects of alcohol consumption.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Mar 5;133(5):50123463056
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Mar 5;133(5):50123463055
PubMed ID
23306990 View in PubMed
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Abstention, alcohol use and risk of myocardial infarction in men and women taking account of social support and working conditions: the SHEEP case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9623
Source
Addiction. 2003 Oct;98(10):1453-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Anders Romelsjö
Maria Branting
Johan Hallqvist
Lars Alfredsson
Niklas Hammar
Anders Leifman
Anders Ahlbom
Author Affiliation
Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs, Stockholm, Sweden. anders.romelsjo@sorad.su.se
Source
Addiction. 2003 Oct;98(10):1453-62
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS: Very few studies indicating that low-moderate alcohol consumption protects from myocardial infarction (MI) controlled for social support and working conditions, which could confound the findings. Therefore, a first aim was to study the risk of non-fatal and total MI in relation to volume of alcohol consumption and measures of social support and working conditions. A second aim was to analyse the impact of the volume of earlier alcohol use in abstainers. DESIGN: Data came from a case-control study, the Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program (SHEEP), including first MI among Swedish citizens 45-70 years old. SETTING: Stockholm County 1992-94. PARTICIPANTS: There were 1095 cases of MI in men and 471 in women (928 and 372 were non-fatal), and 2339 living controls from the general population. MEASUREMENT: Information about alcohol use at different periods in life and job strain, social anchorage and life control besides pre-existing health problems, smoking, physical activity, socio-economic status and marital status was obtained by a questionnaire from the cases and the controls. FINDINGS: In multivariate logistic regression analyses, the relative risk for MI (especially non-fatal) was reduced among alcohol consumers. RR for non-fatal MI was 0.52 (95% confidence intervals 0.32, 0.85) in men with a consumption of 50-69.9 g 100% ethanol/day and 0.21 (95% confidence interval 0.06, 0.77) in women with a consumption of 30 g or more per day (reference category 0.1-5 g 100% ethanol/day). Men who were abstainers during the previous 1-10 years and with an earlier average consumption of 5-30 g 100% ethanol/day had a significantly lower relative risk compared to such abstainers with an earlier higher consumption. Earlier consumption among abstainers may also have an impact on gender differences in MI. Analyses showed positive interaction between abstention and low life-control in women, but only 4% of the female cases were due to this interaction. There were no other interactions between measures of alcohol use and social anchorage, life control and working situations. CONCLUSION: Alcohol use had a protective impact on MI, with little impact of job strain, social anchorage and life control, giving increased support for a protective impact of low-moderate alcohol use. The level of previous alcohol consumption among male 1-10-year-long abstainers influenced the risk of MI.
PubMed ID
14519183 View in PubMed
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Abstinence and current or former alcohol use as predictors of disability retirement in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265157
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):373-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Leena Kaila-Kangas
Teija Kivekäs
Jaana Laitinen
Aki Koskinen
Tommi Härkänen
Leena Hirvonen
Päivi Leino-Arjas
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):373-80
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pensions
Prospective Studies
Records as Topic
Retirement
Risk factors
Abstract
According to previous studies, abstinence from alcohol increases the risk of disability retirement (DR). We studied whether former alcohol users' poor mental or physical health might have contributed to this result.
Prospective population-based study of 3621 occupationally active Finns aged 30-55 years at baseline. Disability pension data for 2000-2011 was retrieved from national pension records. We examined medically certified disability retirement due to all causes and due to mental disorders among lifelong abstainers, former drinkers, those with an alcohol use disorder irrespective of consumption and current users, further classified according to weekly intake of alcohol. Chronic somatic diseases were evaluated in a clinical examination and common mental and alcohol use disorders using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Cox regression was used.
Neither lifelong abstinence nor alcohol consumption, even at hazardous levels, without alcohol use disorder was associated with disability retirement. Compared with light drinkers, former drinkers' hazard ratio for DR due to mental disorders was 2.67 (95% CI 1.39-5.13), allowing for somatic and mental morbidity, physical and psychosocial workload, health behaviour and socio-demographic factors. The respective hazard ratio of DR due to all causes for those with alcohol use disorder was 2.17 (1.49-3.16) and of DR due to mental disorders 4.04 (2.02 to 8.06).
Lifelong abstinence did not predict disability retirement. Former drinkers and people with alcohol use disorders were at a multi-fold risk of work disability due to mental disorders compared with light drinkers, thus it is important to support their work ability.
PubMed ID
25743875 View in PubMed
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Academic stream and tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis use among Ontario high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223837
Source
Int J Addict. 1992 May;27(5):561-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
K R Allison
Author Affiliation
North York Community Health Promotion Research Unit, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Addict. 1992 May;27(5):561-70
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Competency-Based Education
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Environment
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Smoking - epidemiology
Probability
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Social Conditions
Students
Abstract
This paper examines the relationship between academic stream and cigarette, alcohol, and cannabis use among 2,543 high school students as part of the Ontario Student Drug Survey (1987). Students in basic and general academic streams were found to have significantly higher levels of cigarette, alcohol, and cannabis use compared to advanced level students. The effects of academic stream remain significant (except for alcohol use) when gender, grade average, drug education lessons, and pressure to use these substances are included in multiple regression analysis. The findings indicate that the process of academic streaming needs to be further examined as a possible precipitating factor in drug use.
PubMed ID
1601538 View in PubMed
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Accentuation of suicides but not homicides with rising latitudes of Greenland in the sunny months.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89091
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2009;9:20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Björkstén Karin S
Kripke Daniel F
Bjerregaard Peter
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, SLSO, Psykiatri Södra Stockholm, Sköntorpsvägen 29, 2 tr., SE-120 38 Arsta, Sweden. Karin.Sparring.Bjorksten@ki.se
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2009;9:20
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - trends
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Cause of Death - trends
Child
Crime Victims - statistics & numerical data
Female
Forensic Medicine
Greenland - epidemiology
Homicide - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Photoperiod
Population Surveillance
Seasons
Suicide - statistics & numerical data - trends
Wounds, Gunshot - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Seasonal variation in suicides has been shown in many countries. We assessed the seasonality and the variation with latitude in suicides and homicides, and the impact of alcohol on the seasonality in suicides. METHODS: Official computerized registers on causes of death in all Greenland during 1968-2002 were used. Sales data on beer from one of the major food store chains for July 2005-June 2006 were examined. Seasonal variation was assessed by Rayleigh's test for circular distributions. RESULTS: There were a total of 1351 suicides and 308 homicides. The suicides rate varied from 4.2/100 000 person-years in 1971 to 128.4/100 000 person-years in 1987. The homicide rate varied from 2.1/100000 person-years in 1969-1970 to 34.8/100 000 person-years in 1988. Out of the 1351 suicides, 80.5% were committed by men and 19.5% by women. Median age was 25 years (n = 1351; Range 11-84 years). Violent methods of suicide were used in 95% of all cases (n = 1286). Out of the 308 homicide victims, 61% were men and 39% were women, and 13% were killed in multiple homicide events.There was a significant seasonal variation with peaks in June and troughs in the winter in all suicide cases (n = 1351, r = 0.07; Z = 7.58, p
PubMed ID
19422728 View in PubMed
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Activities of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Global Road Safety Programme (formerly RS10) in Russia: promising results from a sub-national project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105462
Source
Injury. 2013 Dec;44 Suppl 4:S64-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Ekaterina S Slyunkina
Vladimir E Kliavin
Elena A Gritsenko
Alexandr B Petruhin
Francesco Zambon
Huan He
Adnan A Hyder
Author Affiliation
Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Electronic address: ekaterina.slyunkina@yahoo.co.uk.
Source
Injury. 2013 Dec;44 Suppl 4:S64-9
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Child Restraint Systems - utilization
Female
Government Programs
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Program Evaluation
Risk factors
Russia
Seat Belts - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
In Russia, the high Road Traffic Injuries (RTIs) rate has been attributed to two well-known risk factors - the low rates of seatbelt and child restraints use and speeding. Despite the importance of understanding both speeding and seatbelt use patterns for the purpose of direct interventions or monitoring road safety situation, no study has assessed the current status of speeding among all vehicles and seatbelt wearing rates among all vehicle occupants in Russia. We are aware that alcohol is a known risk factor for RTI in the country however the work focused on seat belts and speed. This research was conducted as part of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Global Road Safety Programme and focuses on observed speeding and seatbelt use in two Russian regions: Lipetskaya and Ivanovskaya Oblast.
Data was collected through observational surveys on selected roads in the two interventions sites (Lipetskaya and Ivanovskaya Oblast) between October 2010 and March 2013. The percentage of seatbelt use by drivers and passengers and the percentage of speeding vehicles by speed limit and road types were calculated.
Observational studies on speeding show signs that drivers are speeding less from the first survey held in July 2011 in Lipetskaya Oblast and March 2012 in Ivanovksya Oblast. Overall the observational studies showed a consistent reduction in the proportion of vehicles exceeding the speed limit: from 54.7% (2012) to 40.1% (2013) in Ivanovskaya Oblast and from 47.0% (2011) to 26.1% (2013) in Lipetskaya Oblast. Observational studies on seatbelt use demonstrate an increase in seatbelt wearing rates from the first survey held in October 2010 in Lipetskaya Oblast and April 2011 in Ivanovskaya Oblast. The overall prevalence of seatbelt use increased from 52.4% (2010) to 73.5% (2013) amongst all occupants in Lipetskaya Oblast and from 47.5% (2011) to 88.8% (2013) in Ivanovskaya Oblast.
Preliminary results show some promising signs that speeding and seatbelt use are moving in the right direction in both intervention sites subsequent to the various countermeasures being implemented under the Global Road Safety Programme. The study demonstrates the need for further targeted interventions to increase drivers' compliance with the speed limit and seatbelt use. However, it is too early to draw any definite conclusions or to fully attribute the effect to the interventions.
PubMed ID
24377782 View in PubMed
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1160 records – page 1 of 116.