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Alcohol and sexual risk reduction interventions among people living in Russia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263496
Source
AIDS Behav. 2014 Oct;18(10):1835-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Chiao-Wen Lan
Lori A J Scott-Sheldon
Kate B Carey
Blair T Johnson
Michael P Carey
Source
AIDS Behav. 2014 Oct;18(10):1835-46
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Condoms - utilization
European Continental Ancestry Group
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Prostitution - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk Reduction Behavior
Risk-Taking
Russia - epidemiology
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Russia has one of the highest rates of alcohol consumption and is experiencing one of the fastest-growing HIV epidemics in the world. Given these co-occurring health problems, we systematically reviewed combined alcohol and sexual risk interventions to reduce HIV among Russians. We completed comprehensive electronic searches to locate studies that (a) sampled people living in Russia, (b) used a behavioral intervention, and (c) assessed both alcohol and sexual risk behavior. These searches yielded 584 studies, of these, two were included. Compared with controls, intervention participants reported increasing their condom use (ds ranged from 0.12 to 0.85). Within-group improvements in sexual behaviors were found for both groups (ds ranged from 0.19 to 1.94); participants reported fewer sexual partners, more condom use, and reduced alcohol or drug use before sex. These findings support the need and potential benefits for alcohol and HIV interventions among Russians, and suggest directions for public policy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24104461 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol drinking among medical students is alarming. Available preventive programs should be used]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10643
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Jul 14;96(28-29):3228-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-14-1999
Author
M. Berglund
K. Johnsson
Author Affiliation
Alkohol- och narkotikakliniken, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Jul 14;96(28-29):3228-9
Date
Jul-14-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Humans
Students, Medical - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
10434501 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related discussions in health care--a population view.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138145
Source
Addiction. 2011 Jul;106(7):1239-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Pia Mäkelä
Marjaliisa Havio
Kaija Seppä
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Welfare and Health, Department of Alcohol, Drugs and Addiction, Helsinki, Finland. pia.makela@thl.fi
Source
Addiction. 2011 Jul;106(7):1239-48
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Attitude to Health
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mass Screening - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Professional-Patient Relations
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study aimed to evaluate the frequency and the target group of alcohol screening and brief interventions in health-care settings and how well this level of activity reflects public opinion.
A general population survey.
A random sample of Finns aged 15-69 years with a 74% response rate (n = 2725).
Frequency counts were used to evaluate the level of activity. Logistic regression models were used to examine which groups were asked and advised about alcohol use and which groups considered it useful.
More than 90% had positive attitudes towards being asked about their alcohol use. Of those who had been in contact with health care (n = 2062) in the 12 months before the survey, 33.3% had been asked about their alcohol use, being most often men, young, heavy drinkers and those of high socio-economic status. Thirty-seven per cent of those who had been asked were given advice, being most often heavy drinkers and those with a normal body mass index. However, 50% of heavy drinkers who had been asked about their alcohol use had not been advised about it. Of those who had been advised, 71.9% considered it useful, especially older subjects, and also including heavy episodic drinkers, although less than others.
In Finland, the frequency of health-care professionals asking and giving advice on alcohol is relatively low. However, public opinion towards these discussions is positive. Our results encourage the support and uptake of systematic screenings and brief interventions in health-care settings.
Notes
Comment In: Addiction. 2011 Jul;106(7):1249-5021635596
PubMed ID
21205059 View in PubMed
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Drinking control attempts and encouragement of alcohol use in couple relationship--a qualitative approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176241
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2005;40(1):13-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Juhani Suonpaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. juhani.suonpaa@helsinki.fi
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2005;40(1):13-35
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Incidence
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Sexual Partners - psychology
Social Control, Informal
Social Environment
Social Facilitation
Spouses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present study addresses previously neglected research areas among couples with normal drinking habits, namely control attempts and encouragement of drinking. In this study, semistructured interviews were conducted in 2001 with 27 individuals living in steady couple relationships in Helsinki. Forms of active social control of drinking were classified into four categories and were investigated on the dimensions of indirect-direct and mild-strong. Further analysis suggests that the form of control reflects the degree of individualization in relationships, at least when drinking is concerned. Later, the exploration of encouragement of drinking shows that the culturally crucial feature of the qualified drinker is the preservation of one's own will. Then, it is concluded that in a couple relationship, social control and encouragement of drinking are, above all, complementary. Finally, the significance of drinking's social control is not restricted to alcohol use only, and it is surprisingly great in couple relationships, especially in preventing deviant drinking behavior. Several factors are presented that contribute to the increase of social control's importance.
PubMed ID
15702647 View in PubMed
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The extent of the 'prevention paradox' in alcohol problems as a function of population drinking patterns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82957
Source
Addiction. 2006 Jan;101(1):84-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Rossow Ingeborg
Romelsjö Anders
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway. ir@sirus.no
Source
Addiction. 2006 Jan;101(1):84-90
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Risk Assessment - methods
Social Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: To assess to what extent use of various criteria for high-risk groups and analyses from subpopulations with different drinking patterns may affect the extent of the prevention paradox (that most alcohol-related harm in populations arises within the drinkers at low risk). Data sets Two national surveys of Norwegian adult samples (n = 4321 current drinkers) and one register linkage of Swedish armed forces conscripts (n = 45 839 current drinkers) with in-patient hospital data. MEASURES: High-risk groups were categorized as the upper 10% of drinkers by annual alcohol intake or by intoxication frequency. Acute alcohol-related harms comprised number of quarrels and fights in the Norwegian surveys and number of hospital admissions for attempted suicide and violent injuries over a follow-up period (3 and 25 years) in the Swedish conscript study. RESULTS: The majority of acute alcohol problems were found among the majority of drinkers with low or moderate risk (the lower 90%) by drinking volume, suggesting empirical support for the prevention paradox. By applying frequency of intoxication rather than annual volume of consumption to determine the high-risk group, a somewhat larger proportion of acute alcohol-related harms was found within the high-risk group, and the number of alcohol-related harms tended to be distributed more evenly between high-risk drinkers and other drinkers. The proportion of alcohol-related harms within the risk groups was significantly lower in the younger age group, where the majority drinks to intoxication compared with other drinkers. CONCLUSION: The extent of the prevention paradox with respect to acute alcohol problems may be more prominent in drinking in subpopulations where intoxication is a common part of the drinking pattern compared with those where intoxication occurs less frequently and among a smaller fraction of the drinkers.
Notes
Comment In: Addiction. 2006 Feb;101(2):294-5; author reply 296-716445561
Comment In: Addiction. 2006 Feb;101(2):295-6; author reply 296-716445562
PubMed ID
16393194 View in PubMed
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Gender and age differences in the drinking behaviors of university students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217690
Source
Psychol Rep. 1994 Aug;75(1 Pt 2):395-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
L W Svenson
G K Jarvis
R L Campbell
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Psychol Rep. 1994 Aug;75(1 Pt 2):395-402
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alberta - epidemiology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A sample of 457 university students were queried concerning their use of alcohol. The majority (90%) of students reported drinking at least once over the past year, with men drinking more often. Age differences were noted, with older students (Mdn = 32.0 yr. vs 19.0 yr.) more likely to report drinking 4 to 6 times per week. Women generally had healthier attitudes concerning alcohol consumption, e.g., more likely to try to prevent a friend from driving after drinking, pay for use of a taxi, or have a designated driver. Men were more likely to indicate that it is socially acceptable to be intoxicated occasionally and also that most drinkers do not suffer health problems as a result of their drinking. The present study indicates a need to educate university students about the effects of alcohol with a particular emphasis needed for male students.
PubMed ID
7809314 View in PubMed
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Gender differences in health habits and in motivation for a healthy lifestyle among Swedish university students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9231
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2005 Jun;7(2):107-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Margareta I K von Bothmer
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. Margareta.von_Bothmer@hos.hh.se
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2005 Jun;7(2):107-18
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Habits
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Men - education - psychology
Motivation
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Universities
Women - education - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate gender differences in students' health habits and motivation for a healthy lifestyle. The sample of students comprised a probability systematic stratified sample from each department at a small university in the south-west of Sweden (n = 479). A questionnaire created for this study was used for data collection. Self-rated health was measured by number of health complaints, where good health was defined as having less than three health complaints during the last month. A healthy lifestyle index was computed on habits related to smoking, alcohol consumption, food habits, physical activity and stress. Female students had healthier habits related to alcohol consumption and nutrition but were more stressed. Male students showed a high level of overweight and obesity and were less interested in nutrition advice and health enhancing activities. The gender differences are discussed in relation to the impact of stress on female students' health, and the risk for male students in having unhealthy nutritional habits in combination with being physically inactive and drinking too much alcohol.
PubMed ID
15877687 View in PubMed
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Hazardous drinking among restaurant workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120997
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(7):591-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Thor Norström
Erica Sundin
Daniel Müller
Håkan Leifman
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. totto@sofi.su.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(7):591-5
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Restaurants
Risk-Taking
Sweden - epidemiology
Workplace
Young Adult
Abstract
We address three research questions pertaining to Swedish restaurant workers: (i) What is the prevalence of hazardous drinking? (ii) How is the consumption of alcohol distributed? (iii) Does the prevention paradox apply?
Data were collected by administering the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) among restaurant workers who attended a 2-day Responsible Beverage Service training in Stockholm during the period from October 2008 to December 2009. The control group comprised a sample representative of the general Swedish population. We restricted the analyses to the age span 18-59 years, which yielded a sample size of 579 for restaurant workers and 434 for the general population.
The prevalence of hazardous drinking as measured by AUDIT (8+ for men and 6+ for women) was markedly higher among restaurant workers than in the general population. The difference was especially pronounced among females below 30 years of age. We found no difference between restaurant workers and the general population in the distribution of alcohol consumption. About 76% of the drinking problems were found in the lower part of the consumption distribution (bottom 88%), which supports the prevention paradox.
Restaurant workers comprise a high-risk group with respect to drinking.
PubMed ID
22949388 View in PubMed
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How does young people's alcohol consumption change during the transition to early adulthood? A longitudinal study of changes at aggregate and individual level.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11183
Source
Addiction. 1996 Sep;91(9):1345-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
H. Pape
T. Hammer
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Youth Research Centre, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Addiction. 1996 Sep;91(9):1345-57
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health education
Humans
Incidence
Individuality
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Personality Development
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
We have analysed data from a longitudinal representative study to explore aggregate and individual level changes in alcohol use from late adolescence to early adulthood. The sample, which consisted of 2000 Norwegians, was assessed at ages 19-22, 21-24 and 25-28 years. Only a bare majority of the respondents reduced their alcohol intake during the course of the study, whereas a substantial proportion showed an increase. The initial drinking level in individuals whose consumption declined was quite high, and the opposite was true for those who increased their consumption. The findings seemed to reflect true changes, implying that they only could be attributed to measurement errors to a limited extent. The stability in absolute alcohol intake was rather low, especially at the very high consumption levels. However, the respondents clearly tended to maintain their relative drinking position over time. Furthermore, the very high consumers were actually somewhat more apt than others to hold their position relative to the group. In contrast to previous research, these results thus suggest that there is a substantial stability in alcohol use over time. This in turn underscores the importance of implementing preventive programmes targeted towards factors that promote heavy drinking in adolescents.
PubMed ID
8854370 View in PubMed
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How much can data on days with heavy drinking decrease the underestimation of true alcohol consumption?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11505
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1994 Nov;55(6):695-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
M. Göransson
B S Hanson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Lund University, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1994 Nov;55(6):695-700
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Alcoholism - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Bias (epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
An adjusted quantity-frequency method, with questions on occasions with heavy drinking, was used to estimate the consumption of alcohol during the last 30 days. The purpose was to analyze if it was possible to decrease the underestimation of true alcohol consumption. The questionnaire was mailed to a randomized sample of 1,500 individuals, 20-75 years of age, living in the city of Malmö, Sweden; 930 persons (64.3%) participated. Data on alcohol consumption were validated by comparison to sales of alcohol for the city of Malmö. The estimated per capita consumption of alcohol in the population was equivalent to 77.0% of the registered sale of alcohol in Malmö. By adding days with heavy drinking, the estimated weekly per capita consumption of alcohol among the alcohol consumers increased from 74.5 grams to 77.1 grams (+3.5%; p
PubMed ID
7861798 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.