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Addiction Research Centres and the Nurturing of Creativity. Substance abuse research in a modern health care centre: the case of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143386
Source
Addiction. 2011 Apr;106(4):689-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Jürgen Rehm
Norman Giesbrecht
Louis Gliksman
Kathryn Graham
Anh D Le
Robert E Mann
Robin Room
Brian Rush
Rachel F Tyndale
Samantha Wells
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. jtrehm@aol.com
Source
Addiction. 2011 Apr;106(4):689-97
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - organization & administration
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Behavior, Addictive - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Foundations - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Public Policy
Research - organization & administration
Research Support as Topic
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - organization & administration
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health is one of the premier centres for research related to substance use and addiction. This research began more than 50 years ago with the Addiction Research Foundation (ARF), an organization that contributed significantly to knowledge about the aetiology, treatment and prevention of substance use, addiction and related harm. After the merger of the ARF with three other institutions in 1998, research on substance use continued, with an additional focus on comorbid substance use and other mental health disorders. In the present paper, we describe the structure of funding and organization and selected current foci of research. We argue for the continuation of this successful model of integrating basic, epidemiological, clinical, health service and prevention research under the roof of a health centre.
PubMed ID
20491727 View in PubMed
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Can I have a beer, please? A study of alcohol service to young adults on licensed premises in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9322
Source
Prev Sci. 2004 Dec;5(4):221-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Eva Wallin
Sven Andreásson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Crafoords väg 6, 113 24 Stockholm, Sweden. eva.wallin@stad.org
Source
Prev Sci. 2004 Dec;5(4):221-9
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Alcoholic Intoxication - prevention & control
Commerce - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Male
Primary Prevention - standards
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Restaurants - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Responsibility
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This study evaluated the effects of a community alcohol prevention program on the frequency of alcohol service to young adults at licensed premises in Stockholm, Sweden. We used a pretest (1996)-posttests (1998 and 2001) design with intervention and control areas. The multicomponent intervention combines training of serving staff in responsible beverage service, policy initiatives, and enforcement of existing alcohol regulations. Adolescents 18 years old (the legal drinking age on licensed premises in Sweden), but younger looking according to an expert panel, visited licensed premises in pairs, where each adolescent ordered a beer. At baseline in 1996, the adolescents made 600 attempts to order. At follow-up in 1998, the number of attempts to order was 252, and at the second follow-up in 2001, the adolescents made 238 attempts. We found no statistically significant differences between the intervention and control areas. Overall, the frequency of alcohol service to adolescents on licensed premises in these areas of Stockholm decreased significantly over time, from 45 to 41 and to 32%, in 1996, 1998, and 2001, respectively. The decrease in alcohol service in 2001 was statistically significant compared to the baseline in 1996. One explanation for this improvement could be more effective enforcement of existing alcohol laws in both the intervention and control areas. We also found that licensed premises that used doormen to screen potential customers were less likely to sell to minors.
PubMed ID
15566048 View in PubMed
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The Finnish press's political position on alcohol between 1993 and 2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186526
Source
Addiction. 2003 Mar;98(3):281-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Jukka Törrönen
Author Affiliation
The Finnish Foundation for Alcohol Studies, Helsinki, Finland. jukka.torronen@stakes.fi
Source
Addiction. 2003 Mar;98(3):281-90
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Attitude to Health
Finland
Health Policy
Humans
Newspapers
Public Opinion
Public Policy
Abstract
To examine Finnish commentary on changes in alcohol policy between 1993 and 2000. Data. A corpus of newspaper editorials on alcohol issues from six daily newspapers published between 1993 and 2000.
The editorials were analysed as 'pending narratives' by examining how they used 'morally loaded binary discourse', 'utopian discourse' and 'truth discourse'.
Almost half the editorials discussed alcohol policy in terms of freedom from the restrictive alcohol policy of the state. Encouraging liberalization of alcohol policy peaked in 1996 and 1997. However, as problems of public order became more prominent in the media at the end of the 1990s, claims for the liberalization of alcohol policy died away and between 1998 and 2000 issues of public order dominated those of freedom. In addition, concern about the intoxication-orientated drinking habits of the young and of children became prominent.
The results suggest that, after advocating more liberalized alcohol policy and then seeing that there were some groups who responded irresponsibly to this, the middle-class concern about freedom turned into concern about the security of public places and this was reflected in the media. This analysis highlights the dynamic nature of public opinion and media advocacy in response to changes in policy.
PubMed ID
12603228 View in PubMed
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Too drunk for a beer? A study of overserving in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9930
Source
Addiction. 2002 Jul;97(7):901-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Eva Wallin
Johanna Gripenberg
Sven Andréasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Karoliniska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Eva.wallin@stad.org
Source
Addiction. 2002 Jul;97(7):901-7
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Alcoholic Intoxication - prevention & control
Commerce - education - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Public Policy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Role Playing
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS: To evaluate the effects of a community alcohol prevention programme on the frequency of alcohol service to intoxicated patrons at licensed premises. DESIGN: Pretest (1996)-post-test (1999) design. SETTING: Licensed premises in Stockholm, Sweden. INTERVENTION: The community alcohol prevention programme, including server training in responsible beverage service (RBS) and policy initiatives in the community, has been conducted since 1996. PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS: Actors were hired to enter licensed premises, enact a scene of severe intoxication and attempt to order a beer. At the baseline in 1996, actors visited 92 licensed premises, 47 from the central part of Stockholm and 45 from the southern part of Stockholm. At the follow-up in 1999, 103 licensed premises were visited, 61 from the central part of Stockholm and 42 from the southern part of Stockholm. Observers monitored each visit. FINDINGS: At follow-up the actors were denied service of alcohol at 47% of the licensed premises, a statistically significant improvement compared to 5% in the baseline study. CONCLUSIONS: Licensed premises refused service of alcohol to intoxicated patrons to a much greater extent than in the baseline study. The improved results can probably be explained by a combination of policy initiatives in the community, changes in the overall enforcement environment and RBS training.
PubMed ID
12133129 View in PubMed
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