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[40 percent of high school pupils abuse alcohol. Strong connection with exposure to physical or sexual violence].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129824
Source
Lakartidningen. 2011 Aug 24-30;108(34):1556-9
Publication Type
Article

Abstinence, occasional drinking and binge drinking in middle-aged women. The Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92823
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Rundberg Jenny
Lidfeldt Jonas
Nerbrand Christina
Samsioe Göran
Romelsjö Anders
Ojehagen Agneta
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund-Psychiatry, USIL, Lund UniversityHospital, Kioskgatan 19, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. jenny.rundberg@med.lu.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Middle Aged
Motivation
Social Environment
Social Security - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Temperance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although drinking patterns in women have received increased attention, few studies have focused on middle-aged women. Drinking patterns were investigated in a population sample of 513 Swedish women aged 50-59, and analysed in relation to social situation, and mental and physical health. The chi-square test was used to analyse differences in proportions. Variables showing significant differences were entered into a multivariate or multinomial logistic regression model. Abstainers and occasional drinkers had lower levels of education and more often regular medical control compared with weekly drinkers. Furthermore, abstainers more often had disability pension. Among women drinking alcohol, 56.6% affirmed binge drinking within the last year and 39.4% within the last month. Binge drinkers did not differ in terms of social situation, mental or physical health, compared with other drinkers. Drinking to relieve tension was affirmed by 7.2%. These women had more mental symptoms and less contact with friends compared with other drinkers; furthermore, they were more often binge drinkers. Binge drinking was common and health and social consequences of this drinking pattern in middle-aged women need to be further explored. Women drinking to relieve tension may need intervention for both drinking habits and mental health.
PubMed ID
18609026 View in PubMed
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[Acute flank pain syndrome: a common presentation of acute renal failure in young men in Iceland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135735
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Apr;97(4):215-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Helga Margret Skuladottir
Margret Birna Andresdottir
Sverrir Hardarson
Margret Arnadottir
Author Affiliation
Lyflækningadeild, Karolinska háskólasjúkrahúsinu, Stokkhólmi, (áður lyflækningasviði Landspítala).
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Apr;97(4):215-21
Date
Apr-2011
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Acute Kidney Injury - epidemiology
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects
Flank Pain - epidemiology
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Syndrome
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to calculate the incidence of the acute flank pain syndrome in Iceland and to describe the case series.
The hospital records of those who fulfilled the following criteria were studied: age 18-41 years, acute renal failure, and a visit to Landspitali University Hospital in 1998-2007. The acute flank pain syndrome was defined as severe flank pain in combination with acute renal failure, unexplained except for the possible consumption of NSAIDs, ethanol or both. Information was collected about the sales of NSAIDs.
One hundred and six patients had acute renal failure. Of those, 21 had the acute flank pain syndrome (20%). The annual incidence of the acute flank pain syndrome increased threefold during the study period. The average incidence was 3.2/100.000/year (relative to the population of the Reykjavik area) and 2.0/100.000/year (relative to the population of Iceland). 18 patients were male and the median age was 26 (19-35) years. The symptoms regressed spontaneously during a few days or weeks. There was history of NSAID intake in 15, ethanol consumption in 15, either in 20, and both in nine patients. The sales figures of NSAIDs were high and they increased during the study period, especially those of the over-the-counter sales of ibuprofen.
The incidence of the acute flank pain syndrome was high. The paper describes the largest case series that has been published since the withdrawal of suprofen in 1987. Young people should be warned about consuming NSAIDs during or directly after binge drinking.
PubMed ID
21451200 View in PubMed
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Acute pancreatitis: a prospective study on incidence, etiology, and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108807
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013 Sep;25(9):1068-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Hanna Vidarsdottir
Pall H Möller
Halla Vidarsdottir
Hildur Thorarinsdottir
Einar S Björnsson
Author Affiliation
aDepartment of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care bDepartment of Surgery cDepartment of Gastroenterology, The National University Hospital of Iceland dFaculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland eDepartment of Surgery, Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013 Sep;25(9):1068-75
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatic Pseudocyst - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Pancreatitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Pancreatitis, Alcoholic - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Renal Insufficiency - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Prospective and population-based studies on the incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) are lacking. Alcohol consumption has increased considerably in Iceland during the last decade. We aimed to determine the incidence, etiology, severity, and complications of AP and compare the results with a previous study on AP in Iceland.
A prospective population-based study of patients diagnosed with AP at the National University Hospital of Iceland during 1 year (2010-2011). Information on symptoms, etiology, and complications was registered.
During the study period, 134 patients were diagnosed with AP, 78 men (58%), median age 57 years (interquartile range 42-71). Overall, 89/104 (86%) patients had their first attack of pancreatitis, yielding a crude incidence of 40/100 000 inhabitants/year. The major etiological groups were as follows: gallstones, 52 cases (42%); alcohol 29, (23%); postendoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography in 12 (9.5%); medications in eight (6.3%); and idiopathic in 15 (12%). Alcohol was more often the cause in men (25 vs. 4, P
PubMed ID
23839162 View in PubMed
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Adenocarcinoma of the Oesophagus and Oesophagogastric Junction: Analysis of Incidence and Risk Factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279760
Source
Anticancer Res. 2016 May;36(5):2323-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Tuomo Rantanen
Niku Oksala
Juhani Sand
Source
Anticancer Res. 2016 May;36(5):2323-9
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Barrett Esophagus - epidemiology
Cholecystectomy - statistics & numerical data
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Esophagogastric Junction - pathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fundoplication - statistics & numerical data
Gastroesophageal Reflux - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Neoplasm Staging
Neoplasms, Second Primary - epidemiology
Precancerous Conditions - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Conflicting data exist on the changes in the incidence of oesophageal (EAC) and oesophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma (EGJAC). In addition, risk factors of the disease are only partly known. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of EAC and EGJAC in Finland as well as risk factors of these cancers.
The complete number of new EAC and EGJAC cases between January 1980 and December 2007 in Finland was provided by the Finnish Cancer Registry. All treated EAC and EGJAC patients in the Pirkanmaa Hospital District between January 1980 and December 2007 were included in the study.
The incidence of EAC increased significantly in Finland. Barrett's oesophagus (BE) was associated with the risk of EAC and cholecystectomy with the risk of EGJAC.
A significant increase in EAC was found in Finland over the course of nearly 30 years, indicating that the increase in EAC in Finland is existent in the long term. BE was associated with the risk of EAC and cholecystectomy with the risk of EGJAC.
PubMed ID
27127139 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' health and health behaviour as predictors of injury death. A prospective cohort follow-up of 652,530 person-years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158113
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Ville M Mattila
Jari Parkkari
Leena Koivusilta
Tapio Nummi
Pekka Kannus
Arja Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Tampere, 33014 Tampere, Finland. ville.mattila@uta.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:90
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Injuries represent an important cause of mortality among young adults. Longitudinal studies on risk factors are scarce. We studied associations between adolescents' perceived health and health behaviour and injury death.
A prospective cohort of 57,407 Finns aged 14 to 18 years was followed for an average of 11.4 years. The end-point of study was injury death or termination of follow-up in 2001. The relationships of eight health and health behaviour characteristics with injury death were studied with adjusted Cox's proportional hazard model.
We identified 298 (0.5%) injury deaths, 232 (0.9%) in men and 66 (0.2%) in women. The mean age at death was 23.8 years. In the models adjusted for age, sex and socioeconomic background, the strongest risk factors for injury death were recurring drunkenness (HR 2.1; 95% CI: 1.4-3.1) and daily smoking (HR 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3-2.2). Poor health did not predict injury death. Unintentional and intentional injury deaths had similar health and health behavioural risk factors.
Health compromising behaviour adopted at adolescence has a clear impact on the risk of injury death in adulthood independent from socioeconomic background. On the other hand, poor health as such is not a significant predictor of injury death. Promotion of healthy lifestyle among adolescents as part of public health programmes would seem an appropriate way to contribute to adolescent injury prevention.
Notes
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Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2004 Sep;35(3):238-4415313507
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PubMed ID
18366651 View in PubMed
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[A drink can harm the baby in the womb].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129549
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2011 Nov 14;173(46):2939
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-14-2011

Alcohol and breast cancer risk: the alcoholism paradox.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10389
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Oct;83(7):949-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
H. Kuper
W. Ye
E. Weiderpass
A. Ekbom
D. Trichopoulos
O. Nyrén
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention, Harvard University, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Oct;83(7):949-51
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A population-based cohort study of 36 856 women diagnosed with alcoholism in Sweden between 1965 and 1995 found that alcoholic women had only a small 15% increase in breast-cancer incidence compared to the general female population. It is therefore apparent, contrary to expectation, that alcoholism does not increase breast-cancer risk in proportion to presumed ethanol intake.
PubMed ID
10970699 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and coronary heart disease risk--is there an unknown confounder?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173661
Source
Addiction. 2005 Aug;100(8):1150-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Kari Poikolainen
Jussi Vahtera
Marianna Virtanen
Anne Linna
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Foundation for Alcohol Studies, Helsinki, Finland. kari.poikolainen@stakes.fi
Source
Addiction. 2005 Aug;100(8):1150-7
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
To evaluate whether confounding by several known or suspected coronary heart disease risk factors are likely to explain the lower coronary heart disease risk among light alcohol drinkers compared with never-drinkers.
A population-based cross-sectional study.
Hypertension, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, depression, sleep disturbances, smoking, physical activity, life satisfaction, psychological distress, trait anxiety, independent and dependent life events, length of working hours, job control, job strain and effort-reward imbalance were compared between never-drinkers and light drinkers (
PubMed ID
16042645 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol and drug use among medical students 1995: more than every tenth male student had hazardous alcohol drinking habits]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10642
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Jul 14;96(28-29):3253-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-14-1999
Author
B. Borschos
E. Kühlhorn
U. Rydberg
Author Affiliation
Sociologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet. borschos@sociology.su.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Jul 14;96(28-29):3253-8
Date
Jul-14-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Male
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Students, Medical - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
During the spring of 1995, 734 medical students at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm were randomly selected for inclusion in a postal questionnaire study of alcohol and drug habits. The response rate was over 80 per cent. Although both the level of alcohol consumption and the prevalence of hazardous consumption were lower than the corresponding figures for students at Stockholm and Uppsala Universities, 12 per cent of the male and four per cent of the female medical students were considered to be at risk of alcohol problems. About seven per cent of the medical students reported having used illegal drugs such as hashish, marijuana and cocaine during the past 12-month period, and about nine per cent to have used sedative and/or hypnotic drugs.
PubMed ID
10434509 View in PubMed
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253 records – page 1 of 26.